Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church” as Want to Read:
The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church

by
4.35  ·  Rating details ·  600 ratings  ·  23 reviews
This is the standard Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church together with The Psalter or Psalms of David according to use in the Episcopal Church in the United States as authorized in 1979. (1,001 pp)
Hardcover, 1001 pages
Published January 1st 2001 by Church Publishing (first published 1549)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

Be the first to ask a question about The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
4.35  · 
Rating details
 ·  600 ratings  ·  23 reviews


Filter
 | 
Sort order
David Goetz
I mean, Cranmer's prayers are both summit and source of the English liturgical tradition and its descendants. There is a reverence and and a sober-minded joy in the worship it enjoins and directs that has instructed my own heart and that will undoubtedly edify anyone who uses these prayers.
Erin
Jan 10, 2008 is currently reading it
Can't give this a rating, man. Just doesn't seem right. Can't do it.

AJ and I joined St. Phillips Episcopal here in downtown Durham two years ago, and I've been steadily learning more about the theology and history of Anglicanism and Episcopalianism since then. We have sort of an ongoing debate about how structured liturgy can "free you up" or not during worship to pray, meditate, connect, etc... and of course this book is at the center of that debate. I admire its resilience and adaptibility. An
...more
Jacob Aitken
Mar 16, 2014 rated it it was amazing
I think my edition is actually from 1928. The prayers themselves are beautiful and probably represent the ultimate high point of the English language in terms of power and expression. Studying the language in these prayers will keep you from "Jesus Weejus" prayers, which usually begin "Oh Jesus, we just..."
Melinda
Feb 09, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An analogue for my childhood - a book of comfort, familiarity, and peace.
Judith
This small volume is discreet enough to carry with you in your purse or bag. I can have it out on my desk at work at noonday and I don't feel like I'm announcing HEY, look at me, I'm religious.
Diane
Jan 13, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Love it ..
Lukerik
Jul 01, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry, religion
These little books have a translation of the Psalms which is based ultimately on Coverdale's translation rather than the Authorised Version. Don't tell anyone, but I think it's better than the AV. When I first came across it I thought it was wrong, wrong and should be stopped. In place of “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want” you have “The Lord is my shepherd : therefore can I lack nothing”. I just didn't sound right. But take 110:3. This version has “the dew of thy birth is the womb of th ...more
Elizabeth
Nov 15, 2014 rated it liked it
The Book of Common Prayer does what it sets out to do in presenting appropriate texts in a range of options to liturgists, but it is more of a technical manual than a book to read from directly--which would be fine, except many churches use the book itself as their readers for congregants. I know there must be some kind of consistent logic behind the formatting choices but I have never been able to find it, and this can make it incredibly hard to navigate in the moment. Sometimes italics mean on ...more
Erik Graff
Nov 03, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Episcopalians
Recommended to Erik by: Alvin Hart
Shelves: religion
An internship was required for the psychology degree at Union Theological Seminary in New York. Having worked previously in health care, I chose to enter the Clinical Pastoral Education Program at St. Luke's Hospital Center in my Morningside Heights neighborhood in Manhattan. Doing so, I was to discover, required that I play the role of an Episcopal chaplain, the denomination affiliation of the hospital and of its chaplaincy staff. Thus, I donned the collar and picked up a copy, this copy, of th ...more
Patrick\
Apr 23, 2008 rated it it was amazing
A living book. What do I mean by this simple statement? This book is a living entity that speaks to me. When the Great Thanksgiving of the Mass begins, regardless of the disbelief or corruption of the presiding priest, from the spoken word emerges the very presence of spiritual beings, they crowd the altar; the consecration words bring into the bread and wine the spiritual body and blood of the Christ, the cup moves to each communicant with purpose. No partaker is ever abandoned, loving spiritua ...more
Геллее Салахов Авбакар
What a nice attempt to spread our spirit to people who don't know their truth, in fact when I read this nice entity of art, The Book of common prayer is a sort of Prayers held in the English church, but what inspires me the most are the psalms that praise Jesus Christ. Personally I really love having this book whenever I lived in this life.
J. Alfred
Jan 23, 2014 rated it really liked it
The introduction in my copy says that this, which owes most of its language to Archbishop Cranmer, is on par with Shakespeare and the Bible for the most readily recognizable of English phrases. It is sedate and beautiful and very much worth a look, especially, I think, for the less moderate protestants who disdain all written prayers.
"Lighten our darkness."
Cynthia
The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church: Together With the Psalter or Psalms of David According to the Use of the Episcopal Church by Episcopal Church. Holy Eucharist (1979)
Stephen Brindza
Mar 24, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The 1979 prayer book, or what to open when the missalettes run out. Full of beautifully worded prayers, especially the Rite I texts.

Ever wonder where at weddings the "Dearly Beloved, we are gathered here..." comes from? This is the place. Hope your journey is a good one.
Billy
Feb 18, 2009 rated it really liked it
Episcopalians don't have a "founder" or a "confession" or anything like that. What binds us is our liturgy, our worship, and our sacramental life. This prayer book is at the center of these.
Kendall
It's no 1928, et al.
Ryan
Aug 06, 2008 rated it it was amazing
It belongs in every household, on every nightstand. Not that I am biased.
Brian Reagan
It is a decent book, but lacks something when compared to the 1928 BCP.
Jennifer Krieger
Aug 15, 2010 rated it really liked it
The old version.
Melissa
I read this book every day.
David Mills
Jun 12, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Thanks Dad & Mom for the copy you night me at York Minster in 1993. I reference it daily.
Doug Browne
Jun 30, 2014 rated it really liked it
beautiful liturgy...
Debra Case
rated it it was amazing
Mar 09, 2013
Jim Helton
rated it it was amazing
Oct 21, 2013
Joy Shannon
rated it it was amazing
Jul 07, 2014
Alex
rated it it was amazing
May 07, 2009
William West
rated it really liked it
May 05, 2010
Jacob
rated it it was amazing
Mar 19, 2014
Jim Reindollar
rated it really liked it
Jun 01, 2011
Tracey
rated it it was amazing
Jan 10, 2013
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • The Christian Tradition 5: Christian Doctrine & Modern Culture since 1700
  • The Big Book of Christian Mysticism: The Essential Guide to Contemplative Spirituality
  • Thomas Cranmer
  • Tokens of Trust
  • The Beauty of Christ through Brokenness
  • The Women's Bible Commentary with Apocrypha
  • Evangelicalism Divided: A Record of Crucial Change in the Years 1950 to 2000
  • Welcome to the Episcopal Church: An Introduction to Its History, Faith, and Worship
  • The Holy Bible: New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha
  • Meditations with Meister Eckhart
  • The Gospel According to John
  • The Lord and His Prayer
  • Collected Poems: 1945-1990 R.S.Thomas: Collected Poems : R S Thomas
  • John Wesley's Sermons: An Anthology
  • Prayer and Temperament
  • Introduction to Christian Worship
  • Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels, NRSV
  • Extreme Devotion
The roots of the Church of England go back to the time of the Roman Empire when Christianity entered the Roman province of Britain. Through the influences of St Alban, St Illtud, St Ninian, St Patrick and, later, St Augustine, St Aidan and St Cuthbert, the Church of England developed, acknowledging the authority of the Pope until the Reformation in the 16th century.

The religious settlement that ev
...more
“The Collect Lord Jesus, stay with us, for evening is at hand and the day is past; be our companion in the way, kindle our hearts, and awaken hope, that we may know you as you are revealed in Scripture and the breaking of bread. Grant this for the sake of your love. Amen.” 0 likes
More quotes…