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The Nature of Gothic. a Chapter from the Stones of Venice. Preface by William Morris

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3.96  ·  Rating details ·  46 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Ruskin's famous essay The Nature of Gothic first appeared as a chapter in his 1853 The Stones of Venice. It proved highly popular and took on a life of its own. Ruskin inspired Morris. This essay added fuel to another phase of the Gothic Revival in Britain. This facsimile reproduces Ruskin's essay together with a preface by Arts and Crafts designer William Morris, added to ...more
Paperback, 92 pages
Published July 1st 2008 by Euston Grove Press (first published January 1st 1905)
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Steve
Jun 14, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A very fine selection. Ruskin sees architecture like no modern would . This bears re-reading.
Steve
Feb 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Packed with insights. More to follow.
Melissa
Oct 15, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2016, school
If you want to know more about what makes architecture gothic, this outlines the spirit and characteristics of the style perfectly. I was reading it more with a view to what he was saying about society and work. I appreciated Ruskin's ideas about the need for workers to have some creative expression in what we do. That repetitive, mindless work is a form of slavery. But I disagree that the class hierarchy needs to be maintained and that we all have our station.
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John Ruskin was born on 8 February 1819 at 54 Hunter Street, London, the only child of Margaret and John James Ruskin. His father, a prosperous, self-made man who was a founding partner of Pedro Domecq sherries, collected art and encouraged his son's literary activities, while his mother, a devout evangelical Protestant, early dedicated her son to the service of God and devoutly wished him to beco ...more
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“Let us then understand at once that change or variety is as much a necessity to the human heart and brain in buildings as in books; that there is no merit, though there is some occasional use, in monotony; and that we must no more expect to derive either pleasure or profit from an architecture whose ornaments are of one pattern, and whose pillars are of one proportion, than we should of a universe in which the clouds were all of one shape, and the trees all of one shape.” 3 likes
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