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Again the Far Morning: New and Selected Poems

4.36  ·  Rating details ·  11 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Although highly regarded as a writer of fiction, nonfiction, and drama, N. Scott Momaday considers himself primarily a poet. This first book of his poems to be published in over a decade, Again the Far Morning comprises a varied selection of new work along with the best from his four earlier books of poems: Angle of Geese (1974), The Gourd Dancer (1976), In the Presence of ...more
Hardcover, 150 pages
Published April 15th 2011 by University of New Mexico Press
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Laura Jane
Complex poetry. Momaday plays with rhyme and length of lines/syllables a lot. Most of the poems seem to be metaphors for death.
Mary McCray
Mar 25, 2013 rated it liked it
Lots of adept work in forms.
Laura
Mar 10, 2016 added it
Complex poetry. Momaday plays with rhyme and length of lines/syllables a lot. Most of the poems seem to be metaphors for death.
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N. Scott Momaday's baritone voice booms from any stage. The listener, whether at the United Nations in New York City or next to the radio at home, is transported through time, known as 'kairos"and space to Oklahoma near Carnegie, to the "sacred, red earth" of Momaday's tribe.

Born Feb. 27, 1934, Momaday's most famous book remains 1969's House Made of Dawn, the story of a Pueblo boy torn between th
...more
More about N. Scott Momaday