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El fin del mundo y un despiadado país de las maravillas
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El fin del mundo y un despiadado país de las maravillas

4.15  ·  Rating details ·  81,493 Ratings  ·  4,649 Reviews
Dos historias paralelas se desarrollan en escenarios de nombre evocador: una transcurre en el llamado «fin del mundo», una misteriosa ciudad amurallada; la otra, en un Tokio de un futuro quizá no muy lejano, un frío y despiadado país de las maravillas.

En la primera, el narrador y protagonista, anónimo, se ve privado de su sombra, poco a poco también de sus recuerdos, e im
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Hardcover, 624 pages
Published November 15th 2010 by MAXI Tusquets (first published 1985)
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Junta I recently read a collection of his essays, 'Novelist as Profession', published in Japan in 2015 (it might be a while before it's translated into…moreI recently read a collection of his essays, 'Novelist as Profession', published in Japan in 2015 (it might be a while before it's translated into English) - the 9th chapter is on characters.

Although the answers submitted to this question are all valid, there is another simple reason mentioned in that chapter (my translation):
"I was okay with nicknames like 'The Rat' or 'J', but I just couldn't set proper names for the characters. Why not? I'm not sure myself, and can only say that I was embarrassed about naming people. I'm not sure how to put it, but it seemed somewhat artificial for someone like me to be freely designating names onto people (even if they were fictional characters I created).
The first time I was able to properly name characters was in 'Norwegian Wood' (1987). So, in the first eight years before that, I was using nameless characters and writing in the first person view. Thinking about it, it seems I was limiting myself with a tedious rule, but I didn't give it a second thought then."

tl;dr this novel was published in 1985, before Norwegian Wood when he started naming characters.(less)
Rion
This answer contains spoilers… (view spoiler)
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Andrew
Apr 30, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Fans of Murakami or fans of duality/dichotomy
This is your brain (an egg). This is your brain on Murakami (an egg sprouting arms and legs and attempting to hump other eggs while doing the Electric Slide and attempting to save the world to a killer soundtrack).

If you like Murakami, you'll like it, although it doesn't blend the two twisted sides of Murakami's writing as well as a book like "Norwegian Wood" or "Kafka on the Shore." In each of those novels, the reader gets transitions within chapters, and his talents for myth-telling in both t
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Jenn(ifer)

Maybe you’ve heard it said before: in every joke there is a grain of truth. Well, as many of you may remember, I’ve been known to pick on Jay Rubin now and again for what I perceive to be his clunky translations of Murakami’s flawless prose. Because it couldn’t possibly be that Haruki is a clunky writer. Get that thought out of your head right now!! So I like to kid poor Jay and make him the scapegoat, but the more I think about it, the more validity I find in my little quips. You see, dear read
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Florencia
Feb 02, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: japanese
And I couldn't be any other self but my self. Could I?

There is always a possibility.

In the summer of 1962, a poet wrote a song that would later become the last hymn to be heard as the end of the world approached. That is the song I chose to be my companion while writing another non-review; a song that is being followed closely by the mellifluous gusts of wind that break the silence of this monochromatic night.
Being my first Murakami, quite frankly, I didn't know what to expect. This is, witho
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Ben
Whew, blew me away. The influences from Orwell and Kafka are clearly here. Existential meditations, amazingly imaginative, the multitude of interesting and important thoughts that can sprout from the reader's mind. The whole thing is pure genius.

"That's the way it is with the mind. Nothing is ever equal. Like a river, as it flows, the course changes with the terrain."

Typically, Murakami works his way through your subconscious, toying with recognitions of the past and future, in that magical stat
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Kristin Myrtle
This is a complex novel, one that required two reads for me. It tells two stories in alternating chapters. In the first we meet a mild-mannered data processor, only all his "processing" is done inside his head. See... he can do this thing, or he had this thing done to him that allows him to access both hemispheres of his brain simultaneously yet separately. He gets recruited for some top-secret government project led by some mad scientist type, who lives holed up in a cave (under a waterfall) wi ...more
Matthias
May 30, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, my-reviews
In the unlikely event that Haruki Murakami's name on the cover is not in some way a quality label to you, guaranteeing profoundly outlandish scenarios and magic, he threw in the term "wonderland" to make sure everyone knew what to expect. Does the story deliver on all the promises this wonderful title embodies?

Yes.

I decided to re-visit this book after having read it around 3 years ago (before my reviewing habit kicked in) because I remembered it being an instant favorite but didn't remember why
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Stephen M
Right Brain

Upon the fields, yet of no snow,
frolic an acquiescence we yet to sow,
brilliant beasts, their golden fleece ready to unfurl,
trod this place, the end of the world.

Upon this fantasy, comes one of two
unnamed narrators who works in lieu
of status, volition; vagueness washes his mind,
all Kafkaesque, he becomes a dream-reading blind.

On a lost elevator in the counterpart plane
all events are concurrent and faintly the same;
the dyadic complement of the twin conscious
is a tech-savvy tokyoite obs
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RandomAnthony
Feb 18, 2009 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: murakami
The Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World gets my vote the most unique and frustrating book in the Murakami catalog. I got the feeling that there’s a little bit of the fan in Murakami in this text; his love of PK Dick, Vonnegut, etc. seems present, and I imagine passages of the book were great fun to write as a tribute, if you will, to his influences. However, the cold, metallic neurophysiology, whether accurate or not (I don’t know much about brain chemistry, so I can’t say one way or ...more
Jr Bacdayan
May 30, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
You’re taking a shower. Two streams fall onto you at the same time. One stream is cold and revitalizing while the other is hot and soothing. One’s heat fills the room with a foggy mist while the other clears your head driving it awake with its coldness. Each one supplements the other and the effect creates an experience more complete than had the two not been together. An icy torrent showing how crystal clear things are, and a scorching torrent enveloping things with a blanket of moisture, both ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
Sekai no owari to hādoboirudo wandārando=Hard-boiled wonderland and the end of the world, Haruki Murakami
تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیست و یکم جولای سال 2012 میلادی
عنوان: سرزمین عجایب بیرحم و ته دنیا؛ نویسنده: هاروکی موراکامی؛ مترجم: مهدی غبرایی؛ مشهد، نیکونشر، 1390، در 512 ص؛ شابک: 9789647253536؛ یادداشت: این نسخه از متن انگلیسی برگردان شده؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان ژاپنی قرن 20 م؛
فصلهای فرد کتاب در: « سرزمین عجایب بیرحم »؛ میگذرند، راوی این سرزمین عجایب بیرحم، جوانی ست که از ضمیر ناخودآگاه خویش بر
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  • The Collected Poems
  • Palm-of-the-Hand Stories
  • The Ark Sakura
  • Haruki Murakami and the Music of Words
  • The Changeling
  • Naomi
  • Dear Diary
  • 69
  • My Misspent Youth: Essays
  • Runaway Horses
  • Alien vs. Predator
  • Quicksand and Passing
  • The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories
  • Out
  • Sanshirō
  • Kappa
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Murakami Haruki (Japanese: 村上 春樹) is a popular contemporary Japanese writer and translator. His work has been described as 'easily accessible, yet profoundly complex'. He can be located on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/harukimuraka...

Since childhood, Murakami has been heavily influenced by Western culture, particularly Western music and literature. He grew up reading a range of works by Am
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More about Haruki Murakami...
“two people can sleep in the same bed and still be alone when they close their eyes” 919 likes
“Everyone may be ordinary, but they're not normal.” 422 likes
More quotes…