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Zeno's Paradox: Unraveling the Ancient Mystery Behind the Science of Space and Time
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Zeno's Paradox: Unraveling the Ancient Mystery Behind the Science of Space and Time

3.76  ·  Rating details ·  74 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
The fascinating story of an ancient riddle-and what it reveals about the nature of time and space Three millennia ago, the Greek philosopher Zeno constructed a series of logical paradoxes to prove that motion is impossible. Today, these paradoxes remain on the cutting edge of our investigations into the fabric of space and time. Zeno's Paradox uses the motion paradox as a ...more
ebook, 272 pages
Published March 25th 2008 by Plume Books
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Anand Gopal
Sep 23, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mathematics
A well-written history of the idea of motion, starting from Zeno's famous paradoxes (e.g., if before each step I take I first must take half that step, and so on, how is any motion possible?). Mazur, a mathematician by trade, develops the useful idea that calculus and other such tools don't really resolve the motion paradox, they just give us tools to deal with motion. His background into the development of calculus is an enjoyable read. He then ventures into relativity, quantum mechanics and st ...more
Dwight1125
This book starts out 2500 years ago and marches us thru mathematical history to arrive at the door step of modern physics. It is fairly easy to follow is you have read other books on math and physics. I wpuod reccommend it to anyone who is not scared my mathematic formulas or physics.
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“After the death of Archimedes in 212 BCE, the topic of motion was effectively abandoned; it did not resurface for another 1,400 years, when Gerard of Brussels revived the mathematical works of Euclid and Archimedes and came very close to defining speed as a ratio of distance to time.” 1 likes
“It is through Galileo that the connection between math and the physical world became solidified.” 0 likes
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