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Player Piano

3.85  ·  Rating details ·  38,115 Ratings  ·  1,472 Reviews
Kurt Vonnegut’s first novel spins the chilling tale of engineer Paul Proteus, who must find a way to live in a world dominated by a supercomputer and run completely by machines. Paul’s rebellion is vintage Vonnegut—wildly funny, deadly serious, and terrifyingly close to reality.
Mass Market Paperback, 320 pages
Published 1974 by Dell (first published 1952)
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Lisa
Man created machines in his own image...

And man and machine alike were told to worship one deity: the CORPORATE PERSONALITY!

The 10 Commandments according to the Church Of Corporate Thinking:

1. Thou shalt believe in one corporation
2. Thou shalt have no other corporations beside the one you serve
3. Thou shalt honour all traditions and communal behaviours of your corporation
4. Thou shalt accept whatever the corporation tells you as truth
5. Thou shalt have no other truths except for corporate truth
6
...more
Adina
Jan 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I just remembered that I did not review Player Piano. I did not have the time to do it when I finished the novel one month ago and then I forgot.

I am not going to write a full review because I lost the momentum, but I have a few comments.

First of all, If you never read Kurt Vonnegut I would not start with this one. It is very good but I believe it would be better savored by readers that already enjoyed other works by the author. This is his first novel and his fragmented writing style and sati
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Manny
In his first novel, published in 1952, Vonnegut envisages a dystopian future where nearly all jobs have been rationalised away by increasing automation. But, just when things seem most hopeless, a saviour appears in the form of a brash, uncouth but lovable billionaire, who, despite having no previous political experience, rides a populist wave to become President. He immediately expels all illegal immigrants and starts a war against an alliance of Middle Eastern and Asian countries. Within month ...more
Lyn
Aug 31, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut was his first novel, first published in 1952. Early fiction from Vonnegut is told in a more straightforward fashion than Vonnegut readers will be accustomed to from his later works, but his imagination and wit are still unmistakable.

This is a dystopian work describing a United States after a third war where machines have taken the place of 90% of industrial workers. Government work available to displaced workers comes from either the Army, emasculated and bureaucra
...more
BlackOxford
Jan 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: american-fiction
The Cybernetic Script

One of the most important but least discussed consequences of WWII is an ideology. It is an ideology that unites the political left and right, and even transcends the ideologies of Capitalism and Marxism with their apparent conflicts about the nature of human beings and their politics. It is an ideology that became and remains the dominant intellectual force in the world in my lifetime. This ideology goes by a name that is only occasionally used today and is probably recogni
...more
J.L.   Sutton
Jan 15, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
When Kurt Vonnegut does dystopia (as he does in his first novel, Player Piano), you know it's not an empty shell for him to rail against, but a way for him (and us) to work out the implications of a new reality, in this case, our desire to improve the world with technology. In this early dystopian vision (set in the near future after WWIII), the world is nearly completely automated (like the player piano). Society's needs are apparently met. Far from bringing about happiness, automation only ser ...more
Petergiaquinta
It’s been almost thirty years since I read Player Piano, and all I had retained from that first read was the name of the main character, a faint recollection of the novel’s focus on a future world heavily reliant on automation, and a vague sense of not liking the book all that much despite Vonnegut being one of my favorite authors. I had hoped to like the book better as a seasoned adult, but instead I found re-reading Player Piano to be a tedious chore which surprised me, as this year I have ret ...more
Joshum Harpy
May 18, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I was working as a janitor the day that Kurt Vonnegut died. Sweeping the floors, I listened as the news came over talk radio and I remember distinctly standing up stiff and staring hard at the speakers while the news sank in. I had recently heard in interviews and read Vonnegut sharing his feelings about his own death. That he had reconciled himself to it and felt that he had done much with his life, that he was ready to go (I'm paraphrasing, of course his words were funnier and more acidic). St ...more
Sebastien
Disappointed in this one, it was underwhelming. I hadn't read Vonnegut in a long time and was excited to read this. Unfortunately I found the characters rather unlikable, obnoxious, one-dimensional caricatures, while the narrative operated like a chess game in which I could guess most every move before it was made. I also found the messaging heavy-handed. Yeah, I agree or at least am concerned with most of the themes brought up, but it was done with a lack of subtlety that grated on me.

In terms
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Matt  Dorsey
Oct 12, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Is it acceptable to call a soft sci-fi dystopian novel badass? Does that reveal the total nerd at the core of my character?

The only reason I can see for this book not to be mentioned as one of Vonnegut's greats is that it's edged out by the half-dozen or so outright masterpieces in his canon. But for a first novel, this is ace. It's Vonnegut's most conventionally structured novel, and possibly even his least original. The plot is more or less a tweaking of Huxley's 'Brave New World' (Vonnegut h
...more
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Kurt Vonnegut, Junior was an American novelist, satirist, and most recently, graphic artist. He was recognized as New York State Author for 2001-2003.

He was born in Indianapolis, later the setting for many of his novels. He attended Cornell University from 1941 to 1943, where he wrote a column for the student newspaper, the Cornell Daily Sun. Vonnegut trained as a chemist and worked as a journali
...more
More about Kurt Vonnegut...
“I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can't see from the center.” 7212 likes
“And a step backward, after making a wrong turn, is a step in the right direction.” 234 likes
More quotes…