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Thug Life: Race, Gender, and the Meaning of Hip-Hop
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Thug Life: Race, Gender, and the Meaning of Hip-Hop

3.89  ·  Rating details ·  35 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews

Hip-hop has come a long way from its origins in the Bronx in the 1970s, when rapping and DJing were just part of a lively, decidedly local scene that also venerated b-boying and graffiti. Now hip-hop is a global phenomenon and, in the United States, a massively successful corporate enterprise predominantly controlled and consumed by whites while the most prominent performe

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Paperback, 280 pages
Published January 30th 2011 by University Of Chicago Press (first published January 15th 2011)
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Jesse
Jan 17, 2011 rated it really liked it
A really interesting and smart ethnography of black and white male thug/gangsta rap listeners. (Jeffries does the guilty bit about how his research doesn't cover everyone near the end, calling for similar productions concerning female, non-American, GLTBQ and younger listeners, to which, sure.) He finds some really interesting things out, including that these listeners divide along racial lines in thinking about who created rap (black listeners see it as related to and speaking about their colle ...more
Emma
Sep 13, 2016 rated it really liked it
This is an interesting book, I had the author as a professor in school. It does include a history of hip hop and it's origins, but the book is mainly a sociological study. Jeffries interviewed a number of men from the Boston area asking questions about hip hop music and culture. There are some really interesting conclusions regarding hip hop masculinity.

One star off because it is a relatively academic text. This shouldn't be discouraging, it is really quite well written and readable.
Theon Hill
Jun 17, 2016 rated it really liked it
Jeffries offers a compelling and well-researched account of the the intersections of masculinity and hip-hop. In particular, his book interrogates the political, aesthetic, and cultural significance of rap music to the construction of masculinity within majority and minority cultures. This book complements other crucial texts on hip hop like Tricia Rose's "Black Noise" very well.
Debbie
Sep 17, 2014 rated it liked it
Too much of an academic style read for me, but overall the content concerning hip-hop was good.
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