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Just Fine the Way They Are: From Dirt Roads to Rail Roads to Interstates
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Just Fine the Way They Are: From Dirt Roads to Rail Roads to Interstates

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3.60  ·  Rating details ·  30 ratings  ·  17 reviews
Change. Who needs it? We do! Mr. John Slack, the keeper of a tavern beside a rutted dirt road in the early 1800s, thought things were just fine the way they were. So did Lucius Stockton, who ran the National Road Stage Company in the mid 1800s. So too, did the owners of the railroads when the first model T appeared in 1908. Yet with each new innovation, Americans were able ...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published March 1st 2011 by Calkins Creek
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Joan
Oct 13, 2013 rated it it was ok
Recommends it for: student reports
This is a very brief history of how dirt tracks became paved highways.The theme seems to be things are just fine the way they are so why change? and change is inevitable. As to the facts on roadways, I rather doubt I'll remember much of it at all. It was nicely illustrated. We do need more J books on transportation history but this isn't going to do it for a report. Well, it is a beginning.
Renee Hand
Nov 09, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Mr. John Slack, a tavern keeper in 1805, was not happy when two senators from Ohio and Connecticut had decided to tell the U.S. Congress that the United States needed a National Road so the folks who lived in the East could get to the Ohio RIver. Wagon drivers would stay the night at his tavern while their wagons got stuck in the mud going up a nearby hill. It brought him business, a National Road would cost him money. In his mind, things were just fine the way they were.

But Congress went and bu
...more
Sue Morris
Nov 21, 2011 rated it it was amazing
“Mr. John Slack, the keeper of the tavern beside a rutted dirt road in the early 1800s, thought things were just fine the way they were. So did Lucious Stockyon, who ran the National Road Stage Company in the mid-1800s. So too, the owners of the railroads when the first Model-T appeared in 1908. Yet with each new innovation, Americans were able to move around the country more quickly, efficiently, and comfortably. Connie Wooldridge offers an innovative, yet light-hearted look at how the dirt roa ...more
Reader's Paradise
Sep 26, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: review
The book opens in 1805 with an old man not being happy about a new road that the politicians felt was needed to get folks from point A to point B. Old man Slack wasn’t happy about it at all you see his tavern was right on this proposed dirt road and much of his business was his because of that road. When wagon drivers got stuck they stayed at John Slack’s tavern until morning and then would start digging their wagons out; the bonus they would stay another night at the tavern after so much diggin ...more
Cassie McCown
Sep 06, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Just Fine the Way They Are
By: Connie Nordhielm Wooldridge
Illustrated By: Richard Walz
ISBN: 9781590787106
Format: Hardcover

My Rating: ★★★★★

Goodreads’ Synopsis: Change. Who needs it? We do! Mr. John Slack, the keeper of a tavern beside a rutted dirt road in the early 1800s, thought things were just fine the way they were. So did Lucius Stockton who ran the National Road Stage Company in the mid 1800s. So too, did the owners of the railroads when the first model T appeared in 1908. Yet with each new
...more
Carrie
Mar 21, 2015 rated it did not like it
My old review:


I was really interested in reading a children's book that explains how the transportation systems evolved in the US. A book for children 8 and up, I thought it would be full of facts and tidbits of information for young minds. But this book ended up being something that the author uses to try to indoctrinate children into thinking a certain way.

The first page is about Mr. John Slack, which is described above. The author made this tavern man of 1805 sound ignorant and greedy for wan
...more
ILoveBooks
Sep 18, 2011 rated it it was amazing
http://livetoread-krystal.blogspot.co...


This fun and educational picture book teaches children the history of transportation in America. Beginning with dirt roads and the introduction of the National Road… then ending with a look to the future, Just Fine the Way They Are is an enjoyable way to educate children about how the transportation system connected America. The book takes the reader through the building of the National Road, the creation of railroads, the introduction of automobiles, high
...more
Heidi
Sep 03, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: review-request
Sometimes change is hard. Sometimes people believe that things don’t need to change because things are just fine the way they are!
Just Fine the Way They Are tells the story of how the dirt roads in the 1800’s became the U.S. highway system of today with beautiful illustrations by Richard Walz. Wooldridge includes a timeline in the back of the book that highlights relevant points such as the construction of the National Road in 1811 and Henry Ford’s first Model T in 1908. Also included is a list
...more
April
Sep 17, 2011 rated it really liked it
JUST FINE THE WAY THEY ARE:FROM DIRT ROADS TO RAIL ROADS TO INTERSTATES by Connie Nordhielm Wooldridge,illustrated by Richard Walz is a wonderfully written young adult read with two hundred years of American highway system history and wonderful illustrations. Young and old alike will enjoy this story of read.A great way to help anyone understand our highway system better.A must read for parents,grandparentss,children,teachers,as well as a great learning tool. From 1800's until 2004,sometimes thi ...more
Mundie Moms & Mundie Kids
This book is a good for kids to learn about the history of transportation and the worries about change that come with them. The book spans the early 1800's through now and discusses the history of change and how roads, the railroad and such were created and why. The illustrations are great, the history of transportation is fascinating, but the wording was a bit much for kids. There's a lot mentioned on each page that didn't hold my kid's attention long enough for them to want to sit and listen t ...more
Abbie Riddle
Sep 22, 2011 rated it really liked it
Although this is a non-fiction book it is extremely entertaining for elementary students. This book is all about embracing change and being ready for it when it comes. It seems there is a prevalent attitude that emerges among each generation that things are fine the way they are and that because it's always been this way (for as long they can remember) it doesn't need to change. This book explores that change can be beneficial and good if embraced and accepted. I found it very interesting to rea ...more
Monica H at the Readathon
I was so sad! This book started out great. I loved it. The illustrations are amazing. And then I got to the second to last page where Ms. Wooldridge decides to slip in her political agenda. Boo. Political agendas DO NOT belong in children's literature. You may read my full review at www.the-readathon.blogspot.com
Tobinsfavorite
Aug 15, 2011 rated it really liked it
I really liked this book. My 5-year-old son picked it out by himself at the library. I liked the recurring theme of resisting change and how it was applied to us today, indicating that we probably will move away from fossil-fueled automobiles without being pushy about it. I liked the history lesson brought into friendly neighborly form.
Edward Sullivan
Apr 11, 2011 rated it it was ok
Shelves: picture-books
Interesting idea that doesn't quite gel.
wildct2003
Nov 17, 2014 rated it really liked it
Story of transportation "progress" along the National Road route. Good historical perspective.
Michael
Mar 16, 2011 rated it it was ok
Text would be good as an easy reader, but it is hard to see this appealing to the picture book crowd. Just the wrong format for the book.
Nevada Libert
May 02, 2014 rated it really liked it
this is a great book about change.
April
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Cathy
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Stephanie
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Jun 01, 2011
Skyler Huckabee
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Dec 06, 2012
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Jen
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Connie Nordhielm Wooldridge received a master's degree in education and library science from the University of Chicago. She has written picture books and non-fiction for children. She lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.