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The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman
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The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman

3.63  ·  Rating details ·  32 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition.
ebook, 529 pages
Published December 3rd 2010 by Pubone.Info (first published 1914)
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Perry Whitford
Turn of the (20th) century social satire in which a middle-aged widower becomes infatuated with the beautiful wife of a possessive magnate after she comes to inspect his house, which is up for sale.

Lady Ellen Harmon is the rather uncertain heroine, married at an early age and slowly awakened to a sense of autonomy by some new friends against a background of the burgeoning Suffragette movement:

'life had happened to this woman before she was ready for it, that her mind some years after her body wa
...more
Mel
After loving the Passionate Friends so much I found this one to be a bit disappointing. The characters were just too posh, stupid and unlikeable. While there were some very funny and insightful moments on the whole it was a little dull. The central theme of this book was the control that husbands had over wives and how this was a bad thing. But even the romantic writer found himself wanting to own and possess the beautiful woman and I just found him a totally unsympathetic character. The wife wa ...more
Lauren
May 16, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another really fantastic Wells that I can't believe is not better known.There is so mich that is interesting about this novel, starting with the title - Ellen Harmon fights so long and hard for her own identity, what is Wells saying by always identifying her as somebody's wife? Lots of familiar subjects here - feminism, jealousy, the corporation vs. the little guy. A very very satisfying novel with a wonderfully ambiguous ending.
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880695
In 1866, (Herbert George) H.G. Wells was born to a working class family in Kent, England. Young Wells received a spotty education, interrupted by several illnesses and family difficulties, and became a draper's apprentice as a teenager. The headmaster of Midhurst Grammar School, where he had spent a year, arranged for him to return as an "usher," or student teacher. Wells earned a government schol ...more
More about H.G. Wells...
“Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.” 1480 likes
“The thing they wanted they called the Vote, but that demand so hollow, so eyeless, had all the terrifying effect of a mask. Behind that mask was a formless invincible discontent with the lot of womanhood. It wanted, — it was not clear what it wanted, but whatever it wanted, all the domestic instincts of mankind were against admitting there was anything it could want.” 2 likes
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