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7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley on July 25, 2017

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got seven! Bulk up your Want to Read shelf with these brand-new standalone titles.


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Fierce Kingdom
by Gin Phillips

You should read this book if you like: Thrillers, zoos, tough mothers, the animal instinct to survive, high stakes hide-and-go-seek games



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The Punch Escrow
by Tal M. Klein

You should read this book if you like: Science fiction, nanotechnology, outsmarting shadowy organizations, teleportation, unlikely heroes



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Lucky in Love
by Kasie West

You should read this book if you like: YA contemporary fiction, winning the lottery, sweet love stories, yachts, cute coworkers

Check out our interview with West here.



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Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler
by Bruce Henderson

You should read this book if you like: History, WWII heroes, taking down Adolf Hitler, epic stories of courage, personal interviews


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Strange Practice
by Vivian Shaw

You should read this book if you like: Fantasy, the undead, fast-talking doctors, gothic horror, London, murderous monks



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What She Ate
by Laura Shapiro

You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, culinary history, famous women and the things they ate, the power of food



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The Life She Was Given
by Ellen Marie Wiseman

You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, Depression-era traveling circuses, mysteries that span decades, horse farms


BONUS: The wait is over—check out three of the buzziest sequels coming out today!

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Age of Swords
by Michael J. Sullivan

The second book in The Legends of the First Empire fantasy series
(Start off the series with Age of Myth)



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All or Nothing at All
by Jennifer Probst

The third book in the Billionaire Builders romance series
(Start off the series with Everywhere and Every Way)



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Vanguard
by Ann Aguirre

The fourth book in Razorland YA series
(Start off the series with Enclave)





What are you reading this week? Let's talk books in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
20 New Reader-Approved Paperbacks
Recommended 'Shark Week' Reading
Words of Wisdom from Real-Life Book Families

20 New Reader-Approved Paperbacks
Posted by Cybil on July 24, 2017

Does the new paperbacks table at your bookstore call to you as you browse for your next book? You're not alone. Not only are paperbacks the perfect thing to throw in your bag when you're headed out the door, they've also had time to earn readers' praises. Taking advantage of reader reviews, we've rounded up 20 highly rated new paperback releases to add to your Want to Read shelf.

Which of these books would you recommend? Tell us in the comments.


Behold the Dreamers
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The Hour of Land
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The Bear and the Nightingale
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American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant
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Hag-Seed
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The German War
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Around the Way Girl: A Memoir
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The Fate of the Tearling
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The Dollhouse
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My Not So Perfect Life
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The Chemist
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The Whistler
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The Wangs vs. the World
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A Great Reckoning: A Novel
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All Is Not Forgotten
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Behind Closed Doors
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Whistlestop: My Favorite Stories from Presidential Campaign History
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Miss Jane
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How to Be a Person in the World
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Sister Sister
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Check out more recent blogs:
Recommended 'Shark Week' Reading
The Best Romance Books of July
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves This Week

Recommended 'Shark Week' Reading
Posted by Cybil on July 21, 2017



What danger lies beneath the ocean waves? Luckily for us readers, this question has consumed both novelists and nonfiction writers alike for ages. So, just in time for the annual Shark Week (the Discovery Channel's eight days of all things shark-related), we've rounded up some great books on the creatures of the sea.

Which of these books will you add to your Want to Read shelf? Tell us in the comments.


Nonfiction Peeks at Creatures of the Deep
Kon-Tiki: Across the Pacific in a Raft
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The Devil's Teeth
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In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex
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Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916
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Shark
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Adrift: Seventy-Six Days Lost at Sea
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Fictional Fears That Keep You On Shore
Jaws
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The Old Man and the Sea
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Moby-Dick
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Some Chum for the Kids
Neighborhood Sharks
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Sharkabet
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The Shark Caller
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Check out more recent blogs:
The Best Romance Books of July
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves This Week
Riley Sager: Forget 'Write What You Know,' Try 'Write What You Feel'

As Diverse Kids' Books Increase, A Chance for More Muslim Stories
Posted by Cybil on August 07, 2017



Back-to-School Reading is sponsored by XFINITY.

Hena Khan is the author of Amina’s Voice, Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors, and Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story, among other children's books. She's a native of Rockville, Maryland, where she lives with her husband and their two sons.

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As both a reader and author of "diverse" books, it's encouraging to see a heightened awareness of and interest in books that include long underrepresented voices. It seems obvious today that the body of children's literature should have always reflected the entirety of the colorful world we share. But we all know that it hasn't.

And after many years of growing awareness of the need for diverse books, we are finally seeing characters of all backgrounds, races, abilities, genders, religions, and cultures being embraced and celebrated, and have a growing selection of books to choose from, including those featuring Muslims.

I'm grateful to have had support for my stories for a number of years and am encouraged by a recent push to add new Muslim voices. At the same time, I can't help but worry that there will be an over reliance on certain understandable but nonetheless limiting and even dangerous narratives. I also worry that publishers and others will check off the "Muslim story" box once they have one or two books on their list, and decide that is enough to represent 1.6 billion people in the world.

In the US, American Muslims hail from more than 70 countries, and include many immigrants and children of immigrants. But we also descend from African slaves, Arabs who immigrated at the start of the 1900s, and converts of all types. Muslims vary in our traditions, cultures, languages, attitudes, dress, and habits in every way possible. We are as different from each other as any other group of people—Christians, Warriors fans, politicians, and circus performers. And we are so much more than the terrorist narrative, refugee story, or immigrant struggle.

Muslim writers of all backgrounds, and writers who are connected to or familiar with our traditions, are rising to the occasion and offering beautiful, relatable, and memorable stories that speak to the human experience. Writers of color and those who belong to marginalized communities often have to defend their characters, selling them as multi-dimensional people "who just happen to be [insert group]."

What we need more of are a lot more books on a whole lot of subjects by every kind of person that are simply good reads. Maybe then we get to the point where books just happen to be "diverse."

Khan's recommended picture books:
The Best Eid Ever
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Deep in the Sahara
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Malala Yousafzai: Warrior with Words
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The Conference of the Birds
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Khan's recommended middle-grade reading:
A Long Pitch Home
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A Long Walk to Water
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Shooting Kabul
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The Garden of My Imaan
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Khan's young adult recommendations:
That Thing We Call a Heart
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Saints and Misfits
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Does My Head Look Big In This?
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The Authentics
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You can find all of Hena Khan's books here. Like her children's book recommendations? Be sure to add some of Khan's picks to your Want to Read shelf.

Check out more of our back-to-school coverage:
Rick Riordan's Books to Hook Middle School Readers
How to Encourage Kids to Read (Plus Some Modern Children's Classics)
Great Children's Books for Young History Buffs

Back-to-School Reading



Great Children's Books for Young History Buffs
Posted by Cybil on August 07, 2017



Back-to-School Reading is sponsored by XFINITY.

Laurel Snyder is the author of six novels for children including Bigger than a Bread Box, Penny Dreadful, and Orphan Island. She's also written many picture books, including Charlie and Mouse and Swan, the Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Snyder is also an occasional commentator for NPR's All Things Considered.

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When I was a kid, I didn't like history. History was boring. History meant textbooks. So I was surprised when my kids first began reading on their own, and immediately gravitated to history.

That was when I discovered how much "history" has changed. Historical books today are written with kids in mind, incorporating innovative forms, dramatic content, humor, and a much more kid-friendly tone. A reader obsessed with, say, Legos, can learn about their creation. Likewise superheroes, chocolate, or ballerinas.

Maybe the best illustration of this is the current craze for the founding fathers, spurred by the hit smash musical Hamilton. Kids determined not to throw away their shots are reaching for library books about the American revolution, and Martha Brockenbrough's Alexander Hamilton, Revolutionary is about to be their new favorite.

At my own house, where WWI is a regular dinner conversation topic (I'm still not sure exactly how that happened), Nathan Hale's graphic novel Treaties, Trenches, Mud and Blood was a huge discovery, and it opened the door to other chapters in American history, as my kids worked their way through Hale's Alamo All Stars and Donner Dinner Party, among others. And of course, because we happen to live in Atlanta, (we're proud to be residents of John Lewis' congressional district), all of the incredible March books are worn from countless rereadings.

I volunteer at our school library, and can't help but notice that kids also seem to adore books that view history through a quirky or surprising lens. Great examples of this are Sarah Albee's Poop Happened!: A History of the World from the Bottom Up, Bugged: How Insects Changed History, and Why'd They Wear That?

Even for fiction lovers, history is front and center. Kate Messner's popular Ranger in Time series follows a time-traveling golden retriever back to a vast array of historical moments, from ancient Rome to the Oregon Trail.

And for younger readers, picture books now approach a crazy array of topics kids can't help but love, from Chris Barton and Don Tate's Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson's Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions to The Secret Subway by Shana Corey and Red Nose Studio, or The Hole Story of the Doughnut by Pat Miller and Vincent X. Kirsch.

Of course, kids will always love the imaginary world—full of wizarding schools and demigods. But it's been wonderful for me to see how kids today can relate to historical books, which is—it seems—no less surprising or dramatic or funny than fiction.

Alexander Hamilton, Revolutionary
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Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales: Treaties, Trenches, Mud, and Blood
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Bugged: How Insects Changed History
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March: Book One
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Rescue on the Oregon Trail
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Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales: Alamo All-Stars
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Why'd They Wear That?
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Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson's Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions
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You can find all of Laurel Snyder's books here. Have a young history buff in your life? Be sure to add some of Snyder's recommendations to your Want to Read shelf.

Check out more of our back-to-school coverage:
Rick Riordan's Books to Hook Middle School Readers
How to Encourage Kids to Read (Plus Some Modern Children's Classics)
As Diverse Kids' Books Increase, A Chance for More Muslim Stories

Back to School

How to Encourage Kids to Read (Plus Some Modern Children's Classics)
Posted by Cybil on August 07, 2017



Back-to-School Reading is sponsored by XFINITY.

Martha Brockenbrough is the author of The Game of Love and Death, Devine Intervention, and Alexander Hamilton, Revolutionary, among other books for young readers. She's the founder of National Grammar Day and SPOGG, the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar.


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As a kid, I loved nothing more than lying on the grass in the summer reading books. Nancy Drew. Judy Blume. Lloyd Alexander. I used to rip through a novel a day, and when I ran out of new things to read, I'd start over with the old ones.

Not every kid has that same love of reading. One of my kids has dyslexia and it's hard for her. The other, well, let's just say she can do things on Minecraft that probably require government security clearance.

Even so, it's important for kids to keep those reading skills up. The trick for parents is supporting this without turning reading into an assignment, or worse, something that feels like a punishment.

This is where putting kids in charge of their reading makes a big difference. All reading counts: graphic novels, magazine articles, instructions for games. It's important for parents and caregivers to respect and value all reading.

A trip to the library can be a great idea for a lot of reasons: It's free. It's air conditioned. And kids will have many books to choose from. What's more, librarians love matching books to readers.

This is infinitely better than asking your friends and relatives on Facebook for suggestions. Let's face it. Aunt Marge hasn't read a kids' book since 1951. And, well, a lot has been published since Catcher in the Rye. I don't know why grownups expect kids to get really excited about classic books. It's not like they're fainting over Elvis these days. And while kids might appreciate Elvis and his songs, it's as ridiculous to be hung up on classic books as it is to reject any music written after the stuff of our own generations.

Besides, there's such a thing as a modern classic. Here are a few:

For picture books, consider Over and Under the Pond by Kate Messner and Chris Silas O'Neal. This is a gorgeously illustrated nonfiction book that will enhance any summer trip to a pond. (And there are others by the same author-illustrator team).

Likewise, Neighborhood Sharks by Katherine Roy is a really cool close-up look at the spectacular great white sharks that live near San Francisco. While it is an illustrated picture book, it's sophisticated enough for older readers too—the perfect thing for an older sibling to read aloud to a younger.

For middle grade novels, Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder is a riveting, realistic-feeling fantasy about children growing up without adults in an environment that cares for them until the day arrives and it's time for them to leave. It's a beautiful metaphor for childhood, and the sort of book that leaves lots of room for the imagination.

The Shadow Cipher: York #1 by Laura Ruby is a big, fat mystery that eager readers will love—and because it's the first in a series, will clamor for more. Set in an alternative steampunk New York, it follows kids as they solve ciphers and hunt for a long-hidden treasure. As soon as time machines are invented, I'm sending myself a copy to the summer of 1977.

Brockenbrough's recommendations:
Over and Under the Pond
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Neighborhood Sharks
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Orphan Island
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The Shadow Cipher
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You can find all of Martha Brockenbrough's books here. Like her children's book recommendations? Be sure to add some of Brockenbrough's picks to your Want to Read shelf.

Check out more of our back-to-school coverage:
Rick Riordan's Books to Hook Middle School Readers
Great Children's Books for Young History Buffs
As Diverse Kids' Books Increase, A Chance for More Muslim Stories

Back to School

Rick Riordan's Books to Hook Middle School Readers
Posted by Cybil on August 07, 2017



Back-to-School Reading is sponsored by XFINITY.



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Acclaimed author Rick Riordan became a household name with his first young adult series Percy Jackson & the Olympians.

The first book in that now famous series, The Lightning Thief, has an average reader rating of 4.22 stars and more than 1.3 million reviews on Goodreads. It was also adapted into a movie in 2010, which made more than $200 million at the box office.

In addition to Percy Jackson & the Olympians, Riordan's written four other New York Times best-selling series: The Heroes of Olympus, The Trials of Apollo, based on Greek and Roman mythology; the Kane Chronicles, based on ancient Egyptian mythology; and Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, based on Norse mythology. It's little wonder that the author has dominated the Goodreads Choice Awards, winning in the Middle Grade & Children's category for the last six years straight.

So, we thought there's no one more qualified to recommend books to hook middle schoolers on reading.

"I'm always looking for great middle grade reads!" says Riordan. "Here are five of my favorites, guaranteed to hook young readers from page one!"


Shadow Magic by Joshua Khan
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"Shadow Magic is about Thorn, the wayward son of an outlaw, and Lillith Shadow, the heir of one of six ancient magical kingdoms. There should be no reason for these two to ever cross paths, but they do, and the combination is explosive. It's got all the elements of a great fantasy, rendered in a fresh, alluring, well-crafted world, with sympathetic characters and tons of mystery!"


Shadows of Sherwood by Kekla Magoon
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"12-year-old Robyn Loxley is an accomplished gymnast and an amateur tinkerer. One night, while she sneaks out to raid the local salvage yard, Governor Ignomus Crown stages a brutal coup, rounding up and 'disappearing' all members of Parliament and their families. Robyn alone escapes the purge. Hunted by the military police, unsure of her parents' fate, she is forced to flee to the nearby district of Sherwood. So begins her transformation into Robyn Hoodlum. A fantastic middle grade adventure that breathes new life into the myth of Robin Hood. If you're looking for a page-turner for young readers, check it out!"


Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins
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"Collins is best known for The Hunger Games, but do yourself a favor and check out her Underland Chronicles, starting with this book. One day, Gregor falls through a grate in his laundry room and discovers an underground world populated with entire societies of rats, spiders, and cockroaches who live side by side with humans. Gregor's arrival coincides with a prophecy, and may explain the long-ago disappearance of Gregor's father. One of my son's all-time favorite middle grade books, and one of my favorites too!"


The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud
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"In an alternate modern England, 'the Problem' has inexplicably caused ghosts to run rampant and disrupt the lives of mortals. Private agencies have arisen to combat the supernatural, and they rely on children as their operatives, since only their senses are keen enough to detect and combat ghosts. After a horrible accident in her home village, Lucy Carlyle flees to London where she joins a small struggling agency, Lockwood & Co. Soon they are embroiled in a mystery that may cost them their agency and even their lives. Ancient evil, unsolved murders, powerful ghosts, and nefarious mortals—this story will keep you reading late into the night, but you'll want to leave the lights on!"


The Shadow Hero by Gene Luen Yang
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"I love a good superhero story, and this is a hero I bet you've never heard of! Way back in the Golden Age of Comics, the Green Turtle was the first Asian American superhero. Now, Gene Luen Yang has resurrected his story in a funny, fast-paced graphic novel. Check it out for a fresh new action hero!"


Check out more of our back-to-school coverage:
How to Encourage Kids to Read (Plus Some Modern Children's Classics)
Great Children's Books for Young History Buffs
As Diverse Kids' Books Increase, A Chance for More Muslim Stories

Back-to-School Reading



The Best Romance Books of July
Posted by Hayley on July 19, 2017



Do you know who you'll be falling in love with this month? Because we've got some suggestions…

Every month, our team takes a look at what romance books are being published—and how early readers are responding to them. We use this information to curate a list of soon-to-be-beloved favorites, from sizzling contemporary love stories to spicy paranormal romances.

For July, we've got happily ever afters for a devilish rogue, a fiery police detective, a brooding dragon shifter, and more! Add the books that catch your eye to your Want to Read shelf and let us know what you're reading and recommending in the comments.


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The Red
by Tiffany Reisz

Mona swears she'll do anything to save her mother's failing art gallery. Then a mysterious, wealthy man makes her a scandalous offer: He'll help her keep the gallery—if she agrees to be his for one year.



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Locked in Temptation
by Brenda Jackson

The job comes first for police detective Joy. At least that's what she tells herself as she struggles to fight her feelings for hot ex-con Stonewall while uncovering a nefarious underground crime ring.



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Secrets of the Tulip Sisters
by Susan Mallery

Growing up in the small town of New Holland, sisters Kelly and Olivia fell hard for brothers Griffith and Ryan. Ten years later the brothers return, reigniting old feelings and sparking new romance.



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The Ruin of a Rake
by Cat Sebastian

Lord Courtenay didn't care about his reputation until his exploits prevented him from seeing his young nephew. To improve his image, he turns to the very proper (and very irresistible) Julian for lessons in propriety.



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Wicked Grind
by J. Kenner

Being a good girl was fun for a while. Now model Kelsey wants some spice. When her photographer ex offers her a gig at his controversial new show, she jumps at the opportunity, despite his wild, unpredictable nature.



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Fury of Surrender
by Coreene Callahan

Sentenced to die for a crime he did not commit, dragon shifter Forge agrees to undergo painful hypnotherapy treatments to prove his innocence. His one silver lining? His hypnotherapist is young, beautiful, and into dragons.





Plus we've got a fan Q&A with Wired author Julie Garwood and recommendations from Vi Keeland, author of Beautiful Mistake.

What romance book would you recommend? Share it with us in the comments!

Did you know we have a monthly romance newsletter? Click here to sign up!


Check out more recent blogs:
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Riley Sager: Forget 'Write What You Know,' Try 'Write What You Feel'
What Would Jon Snow Read? Book Recs for Your Favorite Game of Thrones Characters

7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley on July 18, 2017

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got seven! Bulk up your Want to Read shelf with these brand-new standalone titles.


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The Last Magician
by Lisa Maxwell

You should read this book if you like: YA fantasy, secret magic, New York City, time travel, thieves, ancient societies, saving the future



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The Breakdown
by B.A. Paris

You should read this book if you like: Psychological thrillers, murder mysteries, Behind Closed Doors, the feeling that you're being watched

Read our interview with B.A. Paris here.


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Cesar's Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us
by Sam Kean

You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, environmental science, quirky history, breathing, humorous and entertaining fun facts



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Arrowood
by Mick Finlay

You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, Sherlock Holmes and London, criminal underworlds, catching serial killers


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Less
by Andrew Sean Greer

You should read this book if you like: Fiction, confused novelists, scintillating satire, LGBT love stories, Americans abroad, turning 50



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Arbitrary Stupid Goal
by Tamara Shopsin

You should read this book if you like: Illustrated memoirs, unconventional upbringings, lovable corner stores, the 1970s, oddballs



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AFTERLIFE
by Marcus Sakey

You should read this book if you like: Fantasy, invincible FBI agents, the narrow line between life and death, epic wars, mind-bending thrillers


BONUS: The wait is over—check out three of the buzziest sequels coming out today!

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Look Behind You
by Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen

The fifth book in the Kendra Michaels mystery series
(Start off the series with Close Your Eyes)



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Firefly
by Molly McAdams

The second book in the Redemption romance series
(Start off the series with Blackbird)



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The Ends of the World
by Maggie Hall

The third book in The Conspiracy of Us YA series
(Start off the series with The Conspiracy of Us)





What are you reading this week? Let's talk books in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
Riley Sager: Forget 'Write What You Know,' Try 'Write What You Feel'
What Would Jon Snow Read? Book Recs for Your Favorite Game of Thrones Characters
The Best Young Adult Books of July

Riley Sager: Forget 'Write What You Know,' Try 'Write What You Feel'
Posted by Cybil on July 17, 2017



Riley Sager is the pseudonym for the author of the essay featured below, whose identity remains secret. We know that the author has been previously published and that he's a man. What else do we know? Well, Sager's Final Girls has become one of the most anticipated thrillers of the summer, a scary mystery with the heart of a slasher movie (the author was inspired to write the book after watching the horror classic Halloween) that Stephen King called "the first great thriller of 2017." Sager wrote this book in a moment of personal turmoil and learned along the way that sometimes you need to write what you feel:


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“Write what you know.”

That advice has been doled out for centuries to anyone attempting to put pen to paper. But what does it even mean? It seems especially unclear for those of us who write fiction. Our job is to make stuff up. If we only wrote what we knew, the majority of novels would be about self-doubt, waiting for royalty checks and ways to get cookie crumbs out of your keyboard. This is especially true of crime fiction. Unless you’re a killer, a cop, a detective, or a girl on a train, it’s often difficult to add your real-life experiences to a fictional world.

As for emotions, well, that’s an entirely different story.

To understand, we need to go back a few years to December 2014. It was the end of a very long, very rough year. In the span of twelve months, I had experienced a series of losses, both personally and professionally. They kept coming, month after month, piling up until, by December, I was jobless, almost broke, and sprawled on the dining room carpet, unwilling and/or unable to get up. Life had literally knocked me to the floor and I had no idea what to do about it.

Despite all that—or maybe because of it—I still wanted to write another book. One book in particular. It was to be called Final Girls, and was about a young woman named Quincy Carpenter who had survived a horror movie-style massacre that claimed the lives of all her friends. I envisioned a psychological thriller about trauma and survival, slasher flicks and film noir, anger, and acceptance. All of it told from Quincy’s point of view.

I almost didn’t write it. I was a 40-year-old man with no idea what it was like to be a twenty-something baking blogger who had fled a knife-wielding maniac. The only thing pushing me forward was the fact that I knew about loss. I knew about sadness and fear and uncertainty. I knew about feeling hollow inside and putting on a brave face and telling everyone in a chipper voice that I was fine when I really, truly wasn’t.

Oh, and I knew about rage. The rage one feels when the universe seems intent on defeating you at every turn, no matter how hard you work, how experienced you are, how well you behave.

Those were the things Quincy and I had in common. So, I used them. I opened my heart and let that loss and fear and anger bleed onto the page. Quincy’s sadness was my sadness. Her loneliness was my loneliness. Her rage was my rage. To blatantly steal a phrase from Gustave Flaubert, "Quincy Carpenter, c'est moi."

Now here we are. Final Girls is being released around the world and all those problems that bedeviled me two years ago have scurried away to the dark corners of the past, hopefully never to return. Validation has a way of doing that. So does catharsis. The character of Quincy went through hell and came out the other side. I did, too, only under very different circumstances. And now that it’s over, I sometimes wonder if Final Girls would even exist if I hadn’t suffered through that cursed 2014. Maybe. Maybe not. There’s no way of knowing.

The only thing I know with any real certainty is that “Write what you know” is like a balloon. Colorful exterior. Hollow center. Essentially weightless and easily popped. Based on my experience, I recommend that you write what you feel.

Riley Sager's Final Girls was picked as one of Goodreads' Best Books of the Month for July. Add it to your Want to Read shelf here.

Check out more recent blogs:
What Would Jon Snow Read? Book Recs for Your Favorite Game of Thrones Characters
Roxane Gay Answers Readers' Burning Questions
The Best Young Adult Books of July