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Great Summer Reading Picks from Authors
Posted by Cybil on May 31, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

To kick off the season of summer reading, we asked thousands of Goodreads Authors (across every genre) to answer the same simple question: What books are on your summer reading list?

Here are some of our favorite responses from writers that include a popular mystery writer, a librarian with an upcoming debut, and writer of a vampire young adult series:

B.A. Paris

"I get asked to read a lot of pyschological thrillers at the moment so there will definitely be some of those on my reading list. But I'm also looking forward to reading The Little Red Chairs by Edna O'Brien, The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman and Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak," wrote B. A. Paris, mystery author of Behind Closed Doors and the June release The Breakdown.

Annie Spence

"In the summer, I want books I can sweat with. To me, that means sexy stuff and classic literature, give your brain and your libido a workout. This year, I want to try the new Claire Dederer memoir, Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning (smart and sexy: double points) and the novel Girls on Fire by Robin Wasserman.

For classics, I've got Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio and William Faulkner's Intruder in the Dust on my list. And I always like a few graphic novels as well: Sunburning by Keiler Roberts and Boundless by Jillian Tamaki look good (Tamaki's This One Summer was great).

If I hadn't already read it, I would cruise in the car and listen to the audio version of Bruce Springsteen's memoir, Born to Run. But I've already read it (it was excellent) so now I'll drive around with Prove It All Night on repeat all summer," wrote Annie Spence, a librarian and author of the upcoming Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks.

Tracy Chevalier

"I have just been sent a proof copy (ARC) of a big fat book called The Resurrection of Joan Ashby by Cherise Wolas, about a young writer, that is meant to be fabulous. Also, I just read a great review of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman that says it is wonderful and FUNNY. How often do you hear that these days about novels? So I've just ordered it and plan to drop everything to read it. Also on my summer stack is The Siege by Helen Dunmore, about the siege of Leningrad during WWII. I've always meant to read it and have heard only good things.

Finally, I like to read at least one classic over the summer. This time it's a little obscure. Many readers know George Gissing for his novel about Victorian journalists and writers called New Grub Street. Lesser known is The Odd Women, about—yes—odd women who don't marry when Victorian society expects them to. This feeds in a little to what I'm researching and writing for next book. That's all I'll say on that for the moment!," wrote Tracy Chevalier, the author of The Girl with the Pearl Earring and the At the Edge of the Orchard.

P.C. Cast

"Finishing Three Dark Crowns, and reading Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor, Flame in the Mist by Renee Ahdieh, and catching up on my Immortals After Dark by Kresley Cole," wrote P.C. Cast, the author of House of Night series.

Ian Doescher

"My family and I are road tripping to Colorado and New Mexico this summer, so I'm planning to read a few novels that take place in those states: Death Comes for the Archbishop (Willa Cather), Angle of Repose (Wallace Stegner), Bless Me, Ultima (Rudolfo Anaya), and Plainsong (Kent Haruf). I plan to read the complete poems of Phyllis Wheatley, I'm working my way through Isaac Asimov's Foundation books, and I'm about to start Stephen King's Dark Tower series. Finally, I'm consuming as much Brian Doyle as possible—he's an amazing Oregon author who is currently struggling with a brain tumor (oh, the euphemisms we use). In any case, it promises to be a wonderful, rich summer of reading," wrote Ian Doescher, author of the William Shakespeare's Star Wars series.

Be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Check out more recent
blogs:
23 Hottest Books of Summer
32 Audiobooks for your Summer Vacation
Bustle & PopSugar Editors Pick Beach Reads


Audible

Start Planning Your Summer Reading
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

From riveting road trip-worthy audiobooks, to your favorite authors' to-read lists, to the hottest books of the season, there's something for everyone whose summer plans include relaxing and reading.


The Hottest Books of Summer
Discover the most beloved new books in every genre


Fiction Authors' Summer Reading PicksNonfiction Writers' Recommendations
What your favorite authors will be readingSee what these researchers read for fun


Bustle & PopSugarThe Summer Challenge           Groups Recs
Editors' new book picksTake the poll                            Reading groups' best books


Best Audiobooks for SummerSummer Reading Deals
Load up before your vacationUp to 80% off ebooks for US readers


Ask the Author
We asked: What books are on your summer reading list? They said…




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Book Groups Recommend Summer Reading
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

Goodreads groups are a buzzing hive of great reading selections across, well, almost any genre or subgenre you can think of! So, naturally, we turned to the groups to suggest some additions to your summer reading list. You'll find selections from The History Book Club, the Chick Lit Book Club, the Addicted to YA group, the Dragons & Jetpacks science fiction and fantasy group, and the Happily Ever After Cafe romance novel group.

Want to get even more out of your season of reading? You can also join these groups.

The History Book Club

Membership: 14,000 members

Focus: History and Nonfiction, historical fiction, biographies, autobiographies, world nonfiction and historical fiction, military history, memoirs, government and political science, health-science-medicine, supreme court and civil rights, presidential history and world history and current events, philosophy.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

The Sympathizer: The story of a man who is torn between between political ideology and individual loyalties. This novel offers a unique perspective on the Vietnam War through the lens of a conflicted communist sympathizer.

Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life: This biography is not only a self-portrait of a lifelong surfer, it's also an adventure that weaves together the author's own story with history.

The Underground Railroad: The author reimages the Underground Railroad as an actual railroad and tells the story of slaves during the pre-Civil War era through Cora's harrowing experience seeking freedom.
The Sympathizer
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Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life
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The Hangman's Daughter
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Addicted to YA

Membership: 24,000 members

Focus: Young Adult books.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

A Court of Wings and Ruin: This is the third book in a popular series and people have been very excited for its release. It seems like almost everyone has read or at least heard of Sarah J. Maas.

Strange the Dreamer: So many people really loved Daughter of Smoke & Bone because of Laini Taylor's beautiful writing. The book has had some mixed reviews, but a lot of people seem to love it.

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children: This book has come highly recommended for years. It's a bit different from the typical summer read because it can be creepy and spooky.

A Court of Wings and Ruin
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Strange the Dreamer
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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
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Dragons & Jetpacks

Membership: 1,400 members

Focus: Science fiction & fantasy.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet: A perfect example of modern science fiction, yet it's so wonderfully character driven and has some amazing relationships. Pretty much extremely positive feedback from the group all around!

Age of Myth: Most of our members have read at least one of Michael's books, and I'm pretty sure we have some of his biggest fans in the group. So imagine our delight when he chose to join our group himself, and he posts on a regular basis too!

Retribution Falls: This is THE perfect book to fill that Firefly shaped hole in your life (yes even though the show was cruelly canceled more than 10 years ago). Sir Lancer, our resident 'Ultimate Recommendations' moderator, cannot recommend this book to enough people—so get reading!

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet
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Age of Myth
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Retribution Falls
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Happily Ever After Cafe

Membership: 3,000 members

Focus: To share our love of 'happily ever afters.'

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

A Man Called Ove: The group focuses mostly on romance and the happily ever afters, but they're willing to expand their reading horizons. This story invokes a variety of emotions guaranteed to bring hours of summer pleasure reading.

The Hating Game: A contemporary romance featuring an unlikely couple who hate each other. It will certainly bring a smile to your face as you read.

Devil in Spring: Lisa Kleypas has consistently produced quality novels that have earned a myriad of fans. This newest historical romance is no exception and will transport you back to another time and place.

A Man Called Ove
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The Hating Game
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Devil in Spring
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Chick Lit Book Club

Membership: 3,500 members

Focus: Reading chick lit books for fun and relaxation.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

The Teashop on the Corner: A delightful novel about second chances.

Maybe in Another Life: This novel is a fun and interesting read that chronicles a great friendship, as well as love, choices, and fate.

The Marriage Lie: A good, easy read with a strong, sympathetic woman as the main character. Although it has some romance, it's more of a domestic thriller that hooks you from the beginning.
The Teashop on the Corner
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Maybe in Another Life
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The Marriage Lie
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Be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Audible

Popular Nonfiction Authors Pick Summer Reads
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

The work of a great nonfiction author can expand your world, make you smarter, and maybe even make you think about yourself a bit differently (not to mention strengthen your cocktail party conversations). So, we asked three of our favorite nonfiction authors to recommend some summer reading, and to explain their picks.

You'll hear from Mary Roach (whose fascinating, funny, and addictive science books should surely be added to your Want to Read list), one of today's most popular historians Nathaniel Philbrick (who makes American history as riveting as a thriller), as well as a guy who will make you 'better and faster,' New York Times columnist Charles Duhigg. Did we also mention that all three were 2016 Goodreads Choice Award nominees as well? Yeah, these writers know what they're talking about!


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Mary Roach

Author Mary Roach loves to ask the questions we're dying to know the answers to…sometimes literally (she wrote an entire book on what happens to our postmortem selves in Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers). She's also explored what our lives would look like off of Earth in Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void.

Her other highly entertaining books include close looks at sex (Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex), war (Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War), and the afterlife (Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife).

The science writer selected three works of fiction for her perfect summer reading, including tales of a a cramped road trip, a crackling read about a boozy lawyer, and a struggling poet who bumbles into a series of mishaps.

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers
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"Should you find yourself crammed in a crappy rented RV with your family this summer, here is fitting, delicious escape. Endearingly verblunget protagonist Josie grabs her kids, ditches her husband, and heads to Alaska on a fraught, hilarious, random, ultimately redemptive road trip. Unlike Josie's children, I did not want it to end. Eggers' genius for fully fleshed, emotionally 3-D characters is much in evidence here. Does your RV have a heater under the sewage tank to keep the contents liquid in cold climes? Do not let your children play with the switch."


I Take You by Eliza Kennedy
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"An unapologetically promiscuous, joyously well-boozed lawyer named Lily finds herself on the brink of marriage with the shit hitting the summer breezes off the Key West resort where her nuptials may or may not transpire. Kennedy also gets hired for screenplays and you will understand why after two pages. I want to quote you a dozen cracking lines of dialog but they won't make sense out of context. Trust me. Funny, funny novel, masterfully executed."


The Financial Lives of the Poets by Jess Walter
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"Matt quits his day job for the ludicrous prospect of a website that delivers financial news in verse. Bills pile up. Foreclosure looms. Marriage is imploding. Late one night, still in his slippers, he drives to the 7-Eleven for milk and more or less doesn't comes back. "Slippers"—as the drug dealers he meets and drives to a party that night call him—blunders into a series of crimes as creatively misguided as his poetry scheme. As with all Walter's books (or anyway, the ones I've read: Beautiful Ruins, Citizen Vince), the writing is witty, well-paced, and just generally amazing."



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Charles Duhigg

Do you ever wish you could change your bad habits or create healthy routines? Pulitzer-prize winning reporter Charles Duhigg has done the research into why you do the things you do, and how you can start changing your patterns. His The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business spent two years on the New York Times bestseller list. And his followup to that bestseller, Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business researches the latest science of productivity, and how managing your thoughts can change your life.

Duhigg is currently writing the Adventures in Capitalism column for The New York Times. His perfect summer books include a dark western, a sci-fi beach read, and a book he loves to read with his boys.

The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt
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"This is a great, dark western that is funny and strange and exciting and, mostly, just kind of weird. It's a western, but totally unlike what you expect a western to be. And, I hear it's getting made into a movie. So if you read it now, you'll seem really smart when you eventually tell your friends that the book is much better."


The Hike: A Novel by Drew Magary
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"This is really fun escapism, and it's pretty inventive and well written, to boot. If you are on a beach, and want a book that is kind of sci-fi but also kind of not-into-robots-or-aliens-or-spaceships, and you like books that make you think (but not too hard), this is a great choice."


Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
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"I have 2 sons, both under 10 years old, and—literally—there will never be enough Diary of a Wimpy Kid books for us to read together. This is like family magic between two covers."



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Nathaniel Philbrick

Nathaniel Philbrick has written extensively on United States history in books that make historical figures leap from the page. His In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex, that explored the real-life events that inspired Moby Dick, won the National Book Award for Nonfiction. Mayflower: A Story of Community, Courage, and War was a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in History. And last year, Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution was a Goodreads Choice Award nominee for history & biography.

So what does the historian consider great summer reading? How about out an explorer's biography, a YA trilogy on the American Revolution, and a Dickens classic?

A Man for All Oceans: Joshua Slocum and the First Solo Voyage Around the World by Stan Grayson
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"Part character study, part adventure story—as close to the definitive word on the enigmatic Joshua Slocum as we'll probably ever have."


Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson
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"The first in an amazing trilogy about the American Revolution for young adults. I don't care what age you are, this is a terrific read."


Little Dorritt by Charles Dickens
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"I'm reading this for the first time and can't put it down—gritty, sad, uplifting, and so very real."


What books are you adding to your summer reading list? Want more inspiration? Check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Audible

Bustle & PopSugar Pick Hot Summer Books
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

We love PopSugar and Bustle and they love readers! Both publications have book clubs on Goodreads, and, yes, you can join the groups.

We asked the groups' moderators and the publications' editors to recommend the summer reading they're particularly excited about. Below you'll find the new releases they'll be packing in their beach bags, from a watery mystery to a science fiction retelling of Joan of Arc.

Ultimate PopSugar Reading Challenge

The Ultimate PopSugar Reading Challenge on Goodreads has almost 8,000 members who take part in a reading challenge of their choosing. You can read about their suggested challenges here. PopSugar editors and the group's moderators polled their readers to recommend these three new releases, all beach-ready for you!

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins
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"Everyone has a secret in Paula Hawkins' latest bewitching psychological thriller, which is just as un-put-down-able as The Girl on the Train. With twisty surprises at every bend, this haunting tale of sisters, betrayal, and the murky waters of our memories will stay with you long after you turn the last page."
Read our interview with Paula Hawkins


The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid
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"Taylor Jenkins Reid's latest novel about the secrets behind the glamorous world of Old Hollywood is the perfect juicy summer read. With a sprinkling of humor, sexy romance, and tear-jerking emotional moments, this fictional story tackles some heavy topics while giving you a glimpse into what life was really like for the rich and the famous in the '50s and '60s."
(Note: This book goes on sale June 13th)


Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan
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"Kevin Kwan's latest novel is the third in his Crazy Rich Asians series, a modern-day Jane Austen tale of old guard vs. young, lavish lifestyles, and over-the-top drama. Prepare to be charmed by Kwan's razor-sharp wit and intrigued by the pure decadence of this outrageous group of characters. Slather on the sunscreen, you'll definitely want to breeze through this beach-read-approved series before the movie comes out!"
Read Kevin Kwan's book recommendations for social climbers


Bustle's American Woman Book Club

Over at Bustle's American Woman Book Club, they've declared 2017 "a year for action" for their 2,100 members. They add "reading has been proven to promote empathy and understanding, and we believe that reading broadly is one small step in mending the divides of our nation." You can read more about the group here. Cristina Arreola, Bustle's books editor, recommends the following picks for summer reading:

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon
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"Dimple is totally over her parents search for the 'Ideal Indian Husband.' She wants to stake out her own future—and her path starts with a summer camp for aspiring web developers. Rishi, on the other hand, is all about tradition. He can't imagine any better way to honor his culture than by marrying the girl his parents have chosen for him. But over the course of one life-changing summer, these two Indian-American teens will have to question what they thought they knew about tradition, about each other, and about love. "


We Are Never Meeting In Real Life by Samantha Irby
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"If you don't have the time (or attention span) to read an entire novel on vacation, pick up this essay collection by "Bitches Gotta Eat" blogger Samantha Irby. You can read one at a time—or, like me, you can choose to fly through the entire thing in a single sitting. You'll laugh; you'll cry; you'll underline every other line and want to share it with your friends once you're finished."


The Book Of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch
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"This Joan of Arc retelling is set in space. It's 2049, and the earth has been transformed by a series of wars. Now, humans live on a mysterious platform called CIEL, which hovers above the earth's surface, and is being run by a bloodthirsty cult leader. But a group of rebels oppose his rule—chief among them is child-warrior Joan of Dirt. Even if you don't typically reach for science-fiction, this book will have you pondering the nature of humanity long after you finish reading."


The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich
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"This book—a murder and a memoir—is unlike any other true crime book. This is the story of Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich, a defense attorney, who unearths some disturbing emotional truths about herself in the process of researching a twisted murder case. It's a riveting read, perfect for Making a Murder or S-Town addicts."
Read novelist Celest Ng and Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich's discussion of fiction vs. true crime


Be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Audible

Favorite Fiction Authors Share Their Summer Books
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

Have you ever wanted to know what your favorite authors read in the summer? Well, my fellow readers, wonder no more!

We tracked down five of your favorite authors across different genres to share their summer reading picks. We asked fantasy and YA novelist V.E. Schwab (AKA Victoria Schwab), bookclub favorite (and author of The Nightingale) Kristin Hannah, debut phenom Brit Bennett, science fiction writer Ken Liu, and romance queen Sylvia Day to each recommend three books that 'to them, would be perfect summer reading.'

Their answers are as varied as the books they write. Which of their recommendations are you adding to your Want to Read list?

V.E. Schwab/Victoria Schwab


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Schwab is not one, but two bestselling authors. As the fantasy writer V.E. Schwab, she penned the beloved Shades of Magic series about multiple, magical Londons. The first two books of the trilogy earned Goodreads Choice nominations in the fantasy category two years in a row. The series concluded with the February publication of A Conjuring of Light. In addition, she's also Victoria Schwab, author of young adult books including The Archived series, the Monsters of Verity series, and The Near Witch series.

Her summer reading selections include the first book in a GLBT romance fantasy series, a nonfiction favorite about a serial killer at the Chicago world's fair, and a book of feminist essays.

Captive Prince by C.S. Pacat
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"The first book in a gorgeous, complex, and lush series about two princes who should be enemies and become much, much more, I read the entire trilogy in a weekend. A perfect lose-yourself read."


The Devil in White City by Erik Larson
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"A captivating look at Chicago, a world's fair, and a serial killer on the loose. This is the best kind of non-fiction, with all the richness and atmosphere of an invented tale."


Shrill by Lindy West
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"A brilliant and hilarious examination of what happens when women use their voice and platform. Loved every chapter."


Kristin Hannah


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Kristin Hannah has written more than 20 novels, but the one that's become a beloved bestseller the world over is The Nightingale—it has an average 4.54 rating on Goodreads with more than 296,485 reviews and nabbed the 2015 Goodreads Choice Award for historical fiction. Since its publication, the book about heroic women during WWII has been translated into more than 39 languages. Hannah's other books include Winter Garden and Firefly Lane.

For her summer reading suggestions, Hannah picks the newest book from mystery & thriller writer Dennis Lehane, a sweeping historical fiction novel set in the aftermath of the American Civil War, and a world of magic and intrigue set at the dawn of the 19th century.

Since We Fell by Dennis Lehane
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"Lehane is a master of suspense and atmosphere, but it's his characterizations that keep me riveted from beginning to end. This book rocks."


News of the World by Paulette Jiles
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"Paulette Jiles' exquisite voice and powerful storytelling gifts are on beautiful display in this jewel of a novel."


Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke
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"Granted, this is a big book for summer reading, but I read it on the beach and loved it so much I forgot about sunscreen and didn't care. A big, beautiful, sprawling novel that sucks you in."


Brit Bennett


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Brit Bennett's first book The Mothers was one of last fall's biggest literary debuts and immediately made this young author a star. It also earned Bennett a Goodreads Choice Awards nomination for best debut author. She was named among the National Book Foundation's '5 under 35' list of promising young novelists. Hollywood has also come calling, with Warner Brothers optioning the book and actress Kerry Washington attached as producer.

Her summer reading selections include a historical romance, a psychological thriller, and a look at a blended family dealing with tragedy.
The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters
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"A historical romance meets crime drama, this story propels forward as the main characters fall in love and stumble into big trouble. Couldn't put it down."


Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka
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" I was fortunate to read an early copy of this debut about an unsolved murder in a voyeuristic suburban community. An impressive psychological thriller set in a town where everyone is always watching and being watched."


Commonwealth by Ann Patchett
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"I loved this exploration of a blended family, brought together through infidelity and scattered by time. A witty but moving novel about the complexity of families that we may or may not chose to join."


Ken Liu


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Ken Liu's debut novel The Grace of Kings launched the epic fantasy series The Dandelion Dynasty where shapeshifting gods drift among silk-draped airships. The second second volume in the series, The Wall of Storms, was published last year along with a collection of short stories The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories—a 2016 Goodreads Choice Award fantasy nominee. The fantasy and science fiction author has also worked as a programmer, a lawyer, and a translator of Chinese fiction (notably The Three-Body Problem, the recipient of the 2015 Hugo Award for Best Novel).

So, what does one of the hottest names in science fiction and fantasy recommend for summer reading? His selections are a novel from Sex and the City author Candace Bushnell, along with a witty fantasy, and a story of a boy's life in Thatcher's England.

Black Swan Green by David Mitchell
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"My favorite book by Mitchell. By turns funny, sweet, and moving, this is an exquisite portrait of a boy's life in Thatcher's England."


Trading Up by Candace Bushnell
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"A sardonic, biting take on the Great American Novel for the early twenty-first century."


Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho
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"Witty and effervescent, this magical regency tale is contemporary period fantasy at its best."


Sylvia Day


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If you're a romance fan, you probably already know about Sylvia Day. If not, well, time for your meet cute! Day wrote the Crossfire series that began with Bared to You and concluded with last year's One with You, which was both a highly Anticipated Book of 2016 and a Goodreads Choice Award nominee in romance.

While she's best known for her Crossfire series, her Renegade Angels and Jax & Gia books are also readily devoured by romance fans. She publishes more fantastical fiction under the pseudonyms S.J. Day (urban fantasy series Marked) and Livia Dare (futuristic thriller In the Flesh). And still this busy writer found time to recommend a summer barbecue whodunit, a stalker story, and a book about beautiful and deadly people.

Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty
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"This whodunit/whathappened takes place during a barbeque (a summer staple) and the deep characterization will keep you engrossed even with a poolside or seaside view."


You by Caroline Kepnes
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"Another master study in characterization, this tale of a stalker and his prey is best read in the warmth of sunlight, to keep the chills at bay."


Bloodline by Sidney Sheldon
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"This classic will take readers to exotic locales with a myriad of beautiful, deadly people. When you can't get away, this book will serve as its own little vacation. "


Which recommendations intrigued you? And be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Audible

32 Audiobooks for your Summer Vacation
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

Whether you're navigating your way through a road trip or getting some sun by the pool, the perfect book paired with a great narrator can make your summer downtime even better. With that in mind, we pulled together 32 audiobooks to download before your next vacation (even your next staycation).

Have a great audiobook suggestion that's perfect for summer? Share it with us in the comments!

All-Ages Classics:
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass
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Peter Pan
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Anne of Green Gables
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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
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Suspenseful Mysteries
A Great Reckoning
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Murder on the Orient Express
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The Dry
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Her Royal Spyness
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Fascinating Science Fiction & Fantasy
American Gods
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The Gunslinger
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Ready Player One
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The Collapsing Empire
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Riveting Young Adult Books
Eleanor & Park
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Six of Crows
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Salt to the Sea
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The Hate U Give
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Enthralling History
Unbroken
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Assassination Vacation
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Killers of the Flower Moon
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The Devil in the White City
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Captivating Memoirs
Priestdaddy
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This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare
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Spaceman: An Astronaut's Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe
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You Don't Look Your Age: And Other Fairy Tales
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Side-Splitting Comedy
Theft by Finding
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The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo
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The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl
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Dad Is Fat
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Terrific Travel & Adventure
Into the Wild
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In the Heart of the Sea
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Wild
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Pirate Hunters
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Be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Audible

Take the Poll: Your Summer Reading Challenge
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

As the sun stays out longer and the weather warms up, the season for summer reading is almost here! As you plan out your summer Want to Read list, get inspired by recommendations from fiction and nonfiction authors, book groups, editors, and more!

So whether your summer travels take you on the road, to the beach, or places like Narnia or Middle-earth, be sure to tell us how many books you’ll be enjoying this summer in the poll and then share what book you're most looking forward to reading in the comments.

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0 total votes · comments and details · invite friends Voting starts on: May 18, 2017 12:00AM PDT


Be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

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23 Hottest Books of Summer
Posted by Hayley on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

Nothing can ruin a vacation like a lack of books. Wherever you'll be this summer—on the beach, on the road, or cozy at home—we've got your reading recommendations covered.

We crunched the numbers to find the new and upcoming books your fellow Goodreads members love. Paula Hawkins' Into the Water is making waves in mystery, and sequels from Sarah J. Maas and Cassandra Clare have cast their spell on YA readers, but aside from the titles you already know about, we wanted to bring you the big books that combine popularity with high marks. That's why every book on our list has a 4.0+ rating! Which ones pique your interest?


Fiction
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Beartown
by Fredrik Backman

In a small town nestled deep in the forest, a community in crisis looks to junior ice hockey for hope and redemption. [Read our interview with Backman here.]
Release date: May 2


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Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine
by Gail Honeyman

Meet Eleanor, a quirky loner who slowly learns she's capable of friendship (and maybe even love) after saving an elderly man's life.
Release date: May 9


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Rich People Problems
by Kevin Kwan

A massive fortune's up for grabs and scandal looms in this hilarious new installment in the Crazy Rich Asians series. [Read Kwan's book recommendations here.]
Release date: May 23


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The Ministry of Utmost Happiness
by Arundhati Roy

In this sweeping saga from the author of The God of Small Things, broken men and women find their lives mended by love. [Read our interview with Roy here.]
Release date: May 2


Young Adult
Always and Forever, Lara Jean
by Jenny Han

Glued to her writing desk, Lara Jean wars with her head and her heart as she chooses a college and contemplates leaving the boy she loves behind. [Read our interview with Han here.]
Release date: May 2


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Flame in the Mist
by Renee Ahdieh

The daughter of a prominent samurai disguises herself as a peasant boy and infiltrates the ranks of a bandit gang in this thrilling series starter.
Release date: May 16


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One of Us is Lying
by Karen M. McManus

In this deadly twist on The Breakfast Club, five strangers walk into detention at Bayview High…and only four walk out alive.
Release date: May 30


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The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue
by Mackenzi Lee

Two friends embark on their Grand Tour of 18th-century Europe, stumbling upon a magical artifact and an unexpected romance along the way.
Release date: June 27


Nonfiction
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Killers of the Flower Moon
by David Grann

The author of The Lost City of Z uncovers the secrets and scandals surrounding the investigation of the Osage Murders in the early 1920s. [Read our interview with Grann here.]
Release date: April 18


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Astrophysics for People in a Hurry
by Neil deGrasse Tyson

Untangle the mysteries of the universe—in the same time it takes your morning coffee to brew—in this engaging and illuminating read. [Read our interview with Tyson here.]
Release date: May 2


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The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir
by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

Blending personal history with true-crime terror, this one-of-a-kind memoir begins with a disturbing and "uncannily familiar" murder case. [Read Marzano-Lesnevich's author-to-author interview with Celeste Ng here.]
Release date: May 16


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Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body
by Roxane Gay

The author of Bad Feminist explores the tension between desire and denial, comfort and care, in this candid, illuminating, and inspiring memoir. [Read our interview with Gay here.]
Release date: June 13


Mystery/Thriller
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If We Were Villains
by M.L. Rio

When real violence invades a theater school, seven young Shakespearean actors must choose the real-life roles that will define them.
Release date: April 11


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The Silent Corner
by Dean Koontz

The bestselling suspense novelist kicks off a new series centered on Jane Hawk, recent widow and the most-wanted fugitive in America. [Read our interview with Koontz here.]
Release date: June 20


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Final Girls
by Riley Sager

The sole survivors of three separate horror movie-scale massacres keep to themselves—until Lisa, the first "Final Girl," winds up dead in her bathtub.
Release date: July 11


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The Breakdown
by B.A. Paris

After a woman she abandoned is murdered, guilt and paranoia haunt Cass in this tense page-turner from the author of Behind Closed Doors. [Read Paris' book recommendations here.]
Release date: July 18


Historical Fiction
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Beneath a Scarlet Sky
by Mark T. Sullivan

Based on a true story, this is the harrowing tale of Pino Lella, who spied for the Allies while serving as the personal driver of General Hans Leyers, the Third Reich's commander in Italy.
Release date: May 1


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Saints for All Occasions
by J. Courtney Sullivan

Two sisters leave their small village in Ireland, never expecting the ways the following decades in America will break and bind their relationship.
Release date: May 9


Romance
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Come Sundown
by Nora Roberts

When a dead body is found outside Bo's family ranch, the police suspect the one man Bo thought she could trust…and love.
Release date: May 30


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Silver Silence
by Nalini Singh

Passion and betrayal collide in this seductive tale of a ruthless ice queen and the changeling who vows to protect her.
Release date: June 13


Science Fiction and Fantasy
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Red Sister
by Mark Lawrence

Born for killing, eight-year-old Nona Grey comes to terms with her destiny at the Convent of Sweet Mercy, a school for would-be assassins.
Release date: April 4


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Borne
by Jeff VanderMeer

In a city littered by discarded experiments and at the whim of a giant bear, a plant-like being named Borne discovers his complex destiny.
Release date: April 25


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The Boy on the Bridge
by M.R. Carey

Desperate for any sign of hope, a small expedition of scientists searches the post-apocalyptic wasteland in this prequel to The Girl with All the Gifts.
Release date: May 2




Tell us what books you'll be checking out in the comments! And discover more of our summer reading coverage here.

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authors@goodreads: John Scalzi and Cory Doctorow Talk Fictional Disasters
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017



We were thrilled to have not just one but two great science fiction authors grace our hallways in San Francisco for a recent authors@goodreads event: John Scalzi and Cory Doctorow came to talk about their new books—Scalzi’s The Collapsing Empire and Doctorow's Walkaway—and answer a few questions from both readers and employees.

Goodreads: Tell us about your new books.

John Scalzi: The basic concept of The Collapsing Empire is that there is this empire…and it collapses. I know right? Spoiler alert! It kind of gives it away right there in the title. [laughter]

Cory Doctorow: Walkaway is an optimistic disaster novel. Disasters are things you get whether you’re an optimistic or pessimist. Doesn’t matter how Pollyanna your outlook is or how well ordered your society is, it’s going to be subject to exogenous shots. You’re going to have belligerent asshole neighbors, or earthquakes, or tsunamis, or mutating microbes, or meteor strikes. What really matters is not whether you have disasters but what happens after them. Does the disaster become a catastrophe? Do people take it as a signal to unleash their bestial nature? Or is it the moment where people rise to the occasion, to see how they can help?


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GR: Goodreads member Ale asks, "Has the current political climate (both in U.S. and globally), influenced or inspired any writing?"

Scalzi: This is actually an example of author being completely clueless to the rest of the world while following up on a weird interest of his own.

I was thinking about the age of sail and empire from the 15th to 18th century and how it would have been drastically different if, for example, the jet stream and the major Atlantic Ocean currents had just gone away and what that would mean for Portugal and Spain and the UK.

In the course of the writing there do seem to be a lot of parallels to what’s going on in the world today. People will come up to me at an event and be like, “I just read your book. It’s clearly about oil.” And you’re just like, “OK!” Because after a certain point once the book is out, it’s not just a book you brought up in your own head, it’s a book that exists in a space between your brain and the brain of the reader. What the reader reads into it is not invalid even if it’s not something you were directly on point to.

For me it was just what happens when you have this natural feature of the world or universe that everyone relies on: It could be a river, it could be the forest, and everyone just assumes it going to be there. But then the forest goes away because the climate changes or the river changes its riverbed because it does—the Mississippi does it all the time. What happens then and what happens to those people who think that feature is always going to be there? It wasn’t about modern times, but of course I live in the world and the modern world is going to get into it no matter what.

Doctorow: We assume books are about things and that authors know what those things are, and both of those statements are contestable.

Ray Bradbury went to his grave swearing Fahrenheit 451 was not a novel about censorship, but that it was about the evils of television. And if someone that much smarter than me can be that sure about something that is so manifestly wrong… [laughter]

But that said, I drew my inspiration from a lot of places. The most proximate cause was reading a San Francisco writer, Rebecca Solnit. Her book, A Paradise Built in Hell, is about how kind people are in disasters, how noble and wonderful people are in disasters, and how completely certain the people who hold the reigns of power are that in times of disaster the poor are coming to eat them, and what they do preemptively to stop that from happening and how that gets in the way.

Also, Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. It's a wonderful book. I think it’s unfortunate that he took 700 pages to say what he could have said in 100 pages because it intimidated a lot of people. Just read the first 100 pages you’re good! His seminal work on wealth and equality was very, very influential on me.

And then there’s a writer named Bruce Sterling, a science fiction writer and now media critic. He created this movement in the late 90s called the Viridian Greens, the answer to the Austere Greens or the Green Left. Bruce said what you need is a luxurious green, a leisure green, a green that is about the celebration of the material culture. The superiority of material culture that is designed to be beautiful and wonderfully made and to bring you pleasure, but is also designed to gracefully decompose back into the material stream when it’s done.

Read the full interview with Scalzi and Doctorow here.


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