The 2017 Hugo Award Finalists Are Here

Posted by Cybil on April 4, 2017


The biggest science fiction and fantasy award announced this year's finalists on Tuesday. The winners of the 2017 The Hugo Awards will be announced at the 75th World Science Fiction Convention in Helsinki, Finland, on August 11. Members of the society vote on the nominees and winners.

The Hugo Awards, which began in 1953, honor excellence in science fiction and fantasy. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the editor who founded the science fiction magazine Amazing Stories in 1926. Here are some of this year's nominees:

Hugo Award Nominees for Best Novel:
All the Birds in the Sky
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A Closed and Common Orbit (Wayfarers #2)
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Death's End (Remembrance of Earth's Past #3)
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Ninefox Gambit (The Machineries of Empire #1)
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The Obelisk Gate (The Broken Earth #2)
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Too Like the Lightning (Terra Ignota #1)
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Hugo Award Nominees for Best Graphic Story:
Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Book 1
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Monstress, Vol. 1: Awakening
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Ms. Marvel, Vol. 5: Super Famous
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Paper Girls, Vol. 1
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Saga, Vol. 6
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The Vision, Volume 1: Little Worse Than A Man
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Check out all of the nominations on the Hugo Award site or watch the video below:



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Catch Up with These Series Before the Next Book Comes Out

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message 1: by Adam (last edited Apr 05, 2017 12:21AM) (new)

Adam Gulledge Not a single title among these twelve that I would seriously consider reading. Not that I'm surprised, though. The Hugo nominations of the past decade plus have been so message heavy, preachy, of low value, or just plain not sci-fi/fantasy, that it's not worth reading anything that wins. (Harlan Ellison warned us about this, lest we forget.)

Unless we're talking Sad and Rabid Puppy suggestions. Those have been a breath of fresh air.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Adam wrote: "Not a single title among these twelve that I would seriously consider reading. Not that I'm surprised, though. The Hugo nominations of the past decade plus have been so message heavy, preachy, of l..."
I couldn't agree more


message 3: by [deleted user] (last edited Apr 05, 2017 06:03AM) (new)

Adam wrote: "Not a single title among these twelve that I would seriously consider reading. ."

Your loss pal, some of them are bloody great, you're more than welcome to piss off and read whatever boring nonsense you enjoy.

Science fiction has, and will, always be about pushing human progress, about the opportunities of a better world. Conversely it can be about the perils of hubris, of refusing to accept change and to move forwards.

I love that you're currently reading Prelude to Foundation. What an amazing lack of understanding you must be taking from it.


message 4: by SigurSof (new)

SigurSof Adam wrote: "Not a single title among these twelve that I would seriously consider reading. Not that I'm surprised, though. The Hugo nominations of the past decade plus have been so message heavy, preachy, of l..."

sadly agreeing over here :(


message 5: by Danielle (new)

Danielle Some good choices here for best graphic story - Saga is easily the best graphic novel of the lot, IMHO. Such a compelling story, so strangely relatable in places for a plot that couldn't be any different from our lives. Ms. Marvel is also a great choice, not only because it's become so much more relevant - and required - in these modern times.

Afraid I haven't read any of the Best Novel titles (though I have read the first Wayfarer's novel). Personally, they're not books I would have chosen but that's how you discover new choices!


message 6: by rosamund (new)

rosamund Monstress is the most imaginative fantasy I have read in a long time -- in graphic form or otherwise. It is inventive, brutal and compelling. I am looking forward to Vol 2, but I'm also afraid that it cannot live up to the promise of the first volume. Of the other graphic novels, I feel Saga and Ms Marvel are also very strong -- I wasn't a big fan of Paper Girls, and I have yet to read the other too. Interesting that Marvel is represented so strongly here, as well as Image of course.

I've read and enjoyed "The Obelisk Gate" -- very imaginative, though not quite as vivid as "The Fifth Season". "Ninefox Gambit" wasn't for me, but I think it's a strong novel and I wouldn't be disappointed if it won. I will be interested to check out the others -- I liked "The Long Way to A Small Angry Planet" so will be pleased to read "A Closed and Common Orbit". Becky Chambers writes aliens very well and imaginatively.

How sad that some people are unwilling to read anything from this engaging and diverse selection!


message 7: by Mikey (new)

Mikey Turcotte


message 8: by Hannah (new)

Hannah Wil wrote: "your more than welcome..."

*you're


message 9: by Jam (new)

Jam Unimpressive selection, that's for sure.


message 10: by Jukka (new)

Jukka Särkijärvi Looks like a stronger list of finalists than we've had for some years, in these and the other categories. Most excellent. I look forward to reading these.

Except the novelette "Alien Stripper Boned From Behind By The T-Rex". I think I'll skip that. No offence to the Puppies, but that doesn't look like my cup of tea.


message 11: by Ellen (new)

Ellen I'd love to hear some suggestions for better books to read than these! Always on the lookout for great sci-fi.


message 12: by Laura (new)

Laura I'm reading Death's End right now, it's mind-blowing. 5+ stars from me!


message 13: by Adam (new)

Adam Gulledge Wil wrote: "Your loss pal, some of them are bloody great, you're more than welcome to piss off and read whatever boring nonsense you enjoy.

You might want to rethink that suggestion. The 2017 WorldCon voting body dropped by over 40% versus 2016, and most voting blocks didn't break 2,000 voters.

Know why? Because the people who run WorldCon, and the people who are in the WorldCon clique, continued to sling mud at the Puppies and their supporters for the last few years, much less anyone who suggested that some works from the past several years were not worthy of the awards they received.

If that drastic of a drop in votes happens after ONE year, that really says something. Moreover, since when does a voting block of less than, let's be charitable, 3,000 people and what they think is good speak for the now well over half a billion sci-fi readers?

Much less after the WorldCon voting crowd has been shown to vote based on feels and ideology, not merit? Much less after it has come to light that it's very easy to game the voting system by buying memberships for others and telling them to vote this way or that?

Science fiction has, and will, always be about pushing human progress, about the opportunities of a better world. Conversely it can be about the perils of hubris, of refusing to accept change and to move forwards.

Funny you should say that, because hubris, and some vanilla-grade elitistism, is exactly what caused most of the WorldCon crowd in 2015 and 2016 to mass vote 'No Award' for several categories, even when it was clear next to none of the voters who did so read the works in the categories where that was voted highest.

Hell, a Tor editor, Teresa Hayden, suggested people do just that if they didn't want to read the suggested works. Talk about shitty behavior.

That's refusing change, and look where it's getting WorldCon and the Hugos. Fewer voters, and more skepticism about their past winners for best works.

I love that you're currently reading Prelude to Foundation. What an amazing lack of understanding you must be taking from it."

If you honestly think The Foundation is in any way comparable to what the Hugos are, much less what the sci-fi fandom is, you're quite mistaken. (I figured someone was going to try that one.) Hari's Foundation Project was a response to the dying beast that was the Galactic Empire, and what he saw that it would bring once it did collapse.

The Hugos have been around for over 70 years, and as such, the Empire is a much more apt metaphor for what it has devolved into.

The award used to have merit and value because it was given to people who earned it though hard work and skill like Philip K. Dick, Harlan Ellison, Orson Scott Card, Dan Simmons and others. What's happened since then? The award has, over time, lost a lot of its worth and been brought to its knees by a clique of people who, over the last almost two decades, have been recommending low quality virtue-signal works as the best of sci-fi/fantasy over those with actual merit.

I can't think of a more underhanded way to ruin something once considered so valuable and prestigious.


message 14: by Adam (last edited Apr 05, 2017 10:31AM) (new)

Adam Gulledge rosamund wrote: "How sad that some people are unwilling to read anything from this engaging and diverse selection!"

You haven't been keeping up with the news, have you?

https://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/03/...

I also can't help but notice that Marvel isn't taking responsibility for this move versus blame and label the fans who closed their wallets and said they were not interested in buying badly written comics or being preached to.

However many times people try this 'diversity' thing, there's a reason why it fails: The masses never wanted it.


message 15: by Megan (new)

Megan I'm not too excited about any of this year's best novel nominees. Death's End and A Closed and Common Orbit look interesting to me, but I haven't read the earlier books in either series. Obelisk Gate just seems like *the* hype book of the year (I've been hearing about and seeing ads for this title for so long I thought this book came out ages ago) and apparently, it's second in a series as well. I wish either books in a series were not eligible to be nominated, or they could only be nominated if they are the first book in the series. I might try out some of these (much) later if I hear something really good from friends.

However, the graphic novel selection is tops! I'm already reading Paper Girls and Saga (take note that Saga Volume 6 is what got nominated though) and I have been wanting to check out Monstress for some time, as well as the new Vision.


message 16: by Devon (new)

Devon The sad and rabid puppies controversy has made me more turned off by the current science fiction/fantasy fanbase. When one group goes out of its way to be anti-inclusion in such a hateful way leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Calling someone an “ignorant half-savage" because that it just happens to not be your taste in books is a pretty cheap-blow of juvenile vitriol.

The puppies controversy is the gamergate of literature. I used to be able to seek out and talk to people about my love of video games and video game culture. Now because of my gender, and the judgmental hate of Gamergate, I have become a closet gamer. It is very heartbreaking to hide what you love because "you can never be a real fan."

There is nothing wrong with reading outside one's comfort zone. You don't have to like it, and you may be surprised that you love it. (This is coming from my librarian background, I work for a Library that caters blind and physically handicapped patron base, where I have to read quite a bit of "books I am afraid may be terrible, but someone out there loves them")

For instance, I've meant to read Liu Cixin for some time. The Three-Body Problem's summary sounds interesting, and the nominee is the third book in the series. I would read several of these titles listed, but I'm doubtful I have the time to read everything. My pickiness is the same for any other Hugo year. I try not to hate on books until after I read them.


message 17: by Adam (last edited Apr 07, 2017 06:16PM) (new)

Adam Gulledge Devon wrote: "The sad and rabid puppies controversy has made me more turned off by the current science fiction/fantasy fanbase. When one group goes out of its way to be anti-inclusion in such a hateful way leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Calling someone an “ignorant half-savage" because that it just happens to not be your taste in books is a pretty cheap-blow of juvenile vitriol.

In the case of the puppies, the WorldCon cliques, and the people who support them among the bloggers, authors, editors and companies out there, have only themselves to blame for making them such a driving force. Not that they'll own up to it, of course. These people never do.

When people get sick of being preached to, or see praise being given to low-quality works on the basis of 'social justice' or 'equality' over merit, like we're probably going to see with Ghostbusters 2016 being in this year's Hugo voting list, someone's going to speak up.

The puppies controversy is the gamergate of literature. I used to be able to seek out and talk to people about my love of video games and video game culture. Now because of my gender, and the judgmental hate of Gamergate, I have become a closet gamer. It is very heartbreaking to hide what you love because "you can never be a real fan."

GamerGate was necessary, and the GameJournoPros list proved it, among many other things. The sole reason it still gets labeled as a 'misogynistic hate campaign', despite the movement being long since vindicated by this point, is because of that famous line from Joseph Goebbels: "Repeat a lie often enough and it will become the truth."

There is nothing wrong with reading outside one's comfort zone. You don't have to like it, and you may be surprised that you love it. (This is coming from my librarian background, I work for a Library that caters blind and physically handicapped patron base, where I have to read quite a bit of "books I am afraid may be terrible, but someone out there loves them")

I make a point of never supporting authors, companies and the like who broadcast that they hate my guts on the basis of my race or sex. (John Scalzi is guilty of both of these things.) At the same time, if I can tell someone's pushing empty ideas like 'social justice' through their works, I won't support them either. (Marvel's a major offender here.)

Speaking as an author about to break into the scene, our job is to be entertainers, not social workers or activists. If the latter two start drowning out the former, we've failed at our job, because no one wants to, nor should they, pay good money to be preached to or talked down to.

For instance, I've meant to read Liu Cixin for some time. The Three-Body Problem's summary sounds interesting, and the nominee is the third book in the series. I would read several of these titles listed, but I'm doubtful I have the time to read everything. My pickiness is the same for any other Hugo year. I try not to hate on books until after I read them. "

I've read a bit of that book the last few times I've been at Barnes and Noble, but it's published by Tor so I won't be buying it brand new. They've been on my boycott list for a while now, despite how much I like what I've read of The Wheel of Time and Ender's Game.


message 18: by Just (new)

Just A. Bean This is the strongest list I've seen in a while. I'm looking forward to reading my way to catching up with it. I've read more of the short fiction and series, which aren't listed here. The series prize is going to be an especially difficult choice.

I think the numbers are down a bit partly because it's in Finland, and a lot of people don't want to travel so far. I sure wish I could go.


message 19: by Jukka (new)

Jukka Särkijärvi The numbers are "down" only from last year's all-time high. The nomination numbers are the second-highest ever.


message 20: by Adam (new)

Adam Gulledge Jukka wrote: "The numbers are "down" only from last year's all-time high. The nomination numbers are the second-highest ever."

I see what you're doing there.

The puppies, and the reaction to them, was the reason the numbers were that high in 2016. I'm guessing you never saw the Anti-Puppy voting slates, or the people giving out memberships to WorldCon in order to drown out their votes. I.E. gaming the system.

And if an 'all-time high' of less than 3,800 votes, for the most prestigious award in science fiction, can be chopped down to just over 2,000 in one year, you don't need to be a genius to see what that shows the Hugos to be.

Nominations are a moot point, but on that, if Ghostbusters 2016 wins the category it was nominated for, no one with any common sense will respect the Hugos again. I already respect it less because it's even there.


message 21: by Just (new)

Just A. Bean Jukka wrote: "The numbers are "down" only from last year's all-time high. The nomination numbers are the second-highest ever."

Oh I hadn't realised that! That's good news. Of course everyone who voted last year could also nominate, and I'm glad so many people did.

(*really wants to go to Finland but can't afford it*)

San Jose 2018!


message 22: by Justin (new)

Justin Maddey Adam wrote: "Not a single title among these twelve that I would seriously consider reading. Not that I'm surprised, though. The Hugo nominations of the past decade plus have been so message heavy, preachy, of l..."

every single one of the graphic novels is great


message 23: by Stacy (new)

Stacy Blomquist Hannah wrote: "Wil wrote: "your more than welcome..."

*you're"


As a retired English teacher, I find this comment rude and unkind.


message 24: by Adam (new)

Adam Gulledge Justin wrote: "every single one of the graphic novels is great "

Subjective. I've only heard of two of these graphic novels before this list came out because one character is getting a movie (Black Panther), and the other is another case of Marvel pandering to diversity quotas versus hiring quality writers. (Ms. Marvel)

And remember, you're speaking for yourself, not me. If the Hugos of the last decade were awarded to works that deserved it based on merit, I'd be more inclined to believe these nominations are good.


message 25: by Jon (new)

Jon I have enjoyed the Hugo related works that I have read the past couple of years. While I disagree with the statement that they are without merit, I wouldn't fault anyone for thinking so as personal taste is subjective. I would ask Adam, or anyone else unhappy with this year's finalists what they liked last year.

In an effort to discuss good science fiction and fantasy in a positive light, what books had merit last year? I'm always looking to broaden my horizons.


message 26: by Jukka (new)

Jukka Särkijärvi Johanna Sinisalo's The Core of the Sun I thought was very good. It rather in places feels like a marriage of the ideas in Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and the MaddAddam Trilogy, which is all kinds of chilling. Came out last year in English.

Likewise, there's Emmi Itäranta's The City of Woven Streets, also freshly out in English and another, more fantastic dystopia. It has an interesting, dreamlike quality. Might as well also list Maria Turtschaninoff's Maresi here, though I haven't read it yet, just to round out the trilogy. We seem to have a knack for writing dystopias over here. Both of these are also freshly out in English.

Andrew Hindle wrapped up his Final Fall of Man series with Human: The Last Tale of the Final Fall of Man. Started a couple of years ago with Eejit. They're humorous space opera. I haven't yet made it past the second book, but I've rather enjoyed them thus far. While the tropes of the space opera genre have been taken apart a million times already, doing it once more with feeling is quite fine by me if it is done this wittily.


message 27: by Devon (last edited Apr 10, 2017 12:26AM) (new)

Devon Jon wrote: "I have enjoyed the Hugo related works that I have read the past couple of years. While I disagree with the statement that they are without merit, I wouldn't fault anyone for thinking so as personal..."

I am always looking for new science fiction and fantasy to add to my stack as well. (Both award winners and not, there are lots of great stories out there.)

My favorite authors in the science fiction and fantasy genre includes in no order as follows: Douglas Adams, Tom Holt, Margaret Atwood, Ursula Le Quin, Anne McCaffrey, Phillip Pullman, Brian Jacques, Jules Verne, Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Kazuo Ishiguro, David Mitchell, and Haruki Murakami. I am up to date on GRR Martin’s Game of Throne series, and have read Lev Grossman’s Magicians series and will re-read American Gods for the upcoming television adaptation. I am also looking forward to the film adaptation of Jeff Vandermeer’s Annihilation from the Southern Reach Trilogy. My favorite recent science fiction books also include Ready Player One, Falling in Love with Hominids, Slade House, and my all-time favorite His Dark Materials Saga Trilogy.

In addition, I have read most of Edgar Rice Burroughs, although he isn’t a favorite because most of his plotlines involve the “princess is in another castle” damsel distress motif that makes him kind of repetitive. I am also making it a mission to read more Phillip K Dick and Octavia Butler, and will be adding other classic science fiction/fantasy authors into my rotation eventually. (I haveThe Man Who Fell to Earth calling me to read it ASAP) My favorite classics in 1984, The White Dragon and The Left Hand of Darkness.

Regarding recent Hugo award nominees, I rather enjoyed Uprooted by Naomi Novik. I was expecting the standard beauty and the beast trope, only to encounter the twisting Polish creepy fairytale plot. It was one of my surprise favorites that I read that year. I am now inspired to read her Napoleonic alternative history Temeraire series, especially when it involves using dragons that are reminiscing of Anne McCaffrey. I also enjoyed overall the The Inheritance Trilogy by NK Jemisin, even if the pacing was slow in the second book for me. (High fantasy is not my favorite form of fantasy as I learned reading JRR Tolkien but I will read it occasionally.)

My genre kryptonite includes books that break genre categories, which include David Mitchell, and young adult. I also read a lot of science nonfiction, and recent favorites include The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II and The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code. Sadly, there are so many great books and not enough time to read them.

I read in a variety of formats and genres and usually try to give everything a good shot. (I have read some duds but then again not every book is for everyone.) With life being busy in general I have little free time to read outside of what I have to for both work and school. Anne McCaffrey and Brian Jacques especially hold a sweet spot in my heart because they were the first authors that got me into reading.


message 28: by Adam (new)

Adam Gulledge Jon wrote: "I have enjoyed the Hugo related works that I have read the past couple of years. While I disagree with the statement that they are without merit, I wouldn't fault anyone for thinking so as personal taste is subjective. I would ask Adam, or anyone else unhappy with this year's finalists what they liked last year.

In an effort to discuss good science fiction and fantasy in a positive light, what books had merit last year? I'm always looking to broaden my horizons."


On that second sentence, you'd be correct if not for one thing: it can be shown, and proven, that the last two years of the Hugos were bogged down in tribalism and overreaction from the WorldCon cliques against the Sad/Rabid Puppy nominations in terms of votes cast and for what.

Remember how many 'No Award's were given out during those two years? Seven, a 140% increase compared to the whole of the existence of the Hugos. (Five in 2015, two in 2016.) The nominations that had fewer votes than No Award were nearly 100% puppy nominations, and those two years were tip-of-the-iceberg years. I can't imagine how bad its gotten within WorldCon for 'No Award' to be highest voted over anything else, for no reason beyond spite.

That said, here's a few works I thought had merit as Sci-Fi or Fantasy works from last year.

- Graphic Story - The Autumnlands - Starts off as classic high fantasy with anthro animals, and quickly turns sci-fi when a human is summoned into the world. The artwork's amazing, it being the reason I bought the comics and trades, but the dialogue and story are no slouches either.

- Dramatic Presentation/Long Form - Ex Machina - My old roommates convinced me to watch this, along with Hardcore Henry, during the last month we lived together, and I was quite surprised at how well the story was told, among many other things. Name recognition was the only reason I saw why it lost to The Force Awakens or Fury Road in terms of votes.

- Novel - The Eternal Champion: Erekose Saga #1 - The first Elric novel I've read so far, though it's not Elric in this case. It's his spirit hopping dimensions, and landing in a world where the human inhabitants see him as their champion, even though he remembers none of it, much less has any way of knowing if it's true. Moorcock's an amazing writer, and I'm getting more of a urge to read his original Elric six set because of this novel.


Elizabeth ♛Smart Girls Love Trashy Books♛ Oh boy, sci-fi fans are being butthurt in the comments! Those are the best kind!


message 30: by Bill (Just a) (last edited May 05, 2017 01:48PM) (new)

Bill (Just a) Congrats to the Fans. Looks like the rule change (EPH & 4/6) worked to neuter the pups. I said last year if the business meeting didn't do something to police the thugs, I was prepared to give up caring. But the Fans took care of business, so good for them.

I will say this will make the Hugo presentation less dramatic. It was a hoot watching no awards sweeping ahead of the puppy poop. And the year before was just as much fun to watch.

Again congrats to the Fans. Looks like you got your convention back.

Now as to the rest of the country......


message 31: by Adam (new)

Adam Gulledge Bill (Just a) wrote: "Congrats to the Fans. Looks like the rule change (EPH & 4/6) worked to neuter the pups. I said last year if the business meeting didn't do something to police the thugs, I was prepared to give up c..."

Translation: I'm fine with spite voting, despite the obvious bias it reveals.

If Ghostbusters 2016 wins this year, you'll have saved nothing.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* If Ghostbusters 2016 wins any award, we are all officially doomed.


message 33: by Bill (Just a) (last edited May 05, 2017 06:06PM) (new)

Bill (Just a) Erin ☕ *Proud Book Hoarder* wrote: "If Ghostbusters 2016 wins any award, we are all officially doomed."

Yes, it's official. Who knew?


message 34: by Jaime (new)

Jaime Osbourn Wil wrote: "Adam wrote: "Not a single title among these twelve that I would seriously consider reading. ."

Your loss pal, some of them are bloody great, you're more than welcome to piss off and read whatever ..."


Very nice that we have someone as full of himself as you to tell us what we should be reading and what we're missing.


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