Comfort Reading: The Books That Helped You Cope

Posted by Hayley on October 6, 2016
"There are two types of people in the world," Nicole Krauss wrote in The History of Love, "those who prefer to be sad among others, and those who prefer to be sad alone." We might suggest a third type of person—those who prefer to be sad among books (because you're never alone, or sad for very long, when you have a good book). We asked you on Facebook and Twitter: What book has brought you great comfort? Your top answers are below.


Gift from the Sea
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The Art of Racing in the Rain
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Peace Like a River
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More Happy Than Not
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Anne of Green Gables
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Joys and Sorrows
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The Wind in the Willows
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Power to Save the World
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The Five People You Meet in Heaven
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Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
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Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
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The Color of Magic
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The Elegance of a Hedgehog
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Codependent No More
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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying
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The Little Prince
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Did your favorite comforting read not make the list? Share it with us in the comments. Then strip away stress with Goodreads' guide to relaxation!




Comments Showing 1-44 of 44 (44 new)

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message 1: by Sayondeep (new)

Sayondeep Choudhury Paulo Coelho's books give me a lot of comfort


message 2: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca haha the history of love should obviously be on this liest!


message 3: by Chelsey (new)

Chelsey Cosh This may seem odd, but books where a character overcomes human trauma comfort me. They speak to me in a way that reminds me that everything will be all right in the end. I personally love The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (frankly, the whole Millennium trilogy qualifies) and The Perks of Being A Wallflower. But for the nicer side of things, I love the poetic childhood reads, like Green Eggs and Ham or Where The Sidewalk Ends.


message 4: by Taya (new)

Taya Iv Rebecca wrote: "haha the history of love should obviously be on this liest!"

I agree! The History of Love should definitely be included!


message 5: by Ulla (new)

Ulla Reading anything of Ashley Capes' poety and fantasy calms me down and makes me feel happy!


message 6: by Morgan (new)

Morgan Love Wind in the Willows!


message 7: by Keiry (new)

Keiry Ko The Little Prince! <3


message 8: by Sara (last edited Oct 14, 2016 07:18AM) (new)


message 9: by CC (new)

CC Chelsey wrote: "This may seem odd, but books where a character overcomes human trauma comfort me. They speak to me in a way that reminds me that everything will be all right in the end. I personally love The Girl ..."
I agree on Where the Sidewalk Ends...that book really touched me!


message 10: by Alexis (new)

Alexis Sara wrote:
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith


+1000!

I'm going to add... Howl's Moving Castle (Howl's Moving Castle, #1) by Diana Wynne Jones , which is a surprisingly thoughtful adventure that always makes me cozy.


message 11: by Mary ♥ (new)

Mary ♥ EMILY WINDSNAP WAS ALWAYS THE BOOK THAT MADE ME FORGET ALL MY PROBLEMS ♥


message 12: by Cassie (new)

Cassie Pride & Prejudice. All the characters you root for get their happy ending, even after it seemed impossible.


message 13: by A. (new)

A.  J. If dealing with Death: Neil Gaiman's Sandman. It gives you a new way of looking at things.


message 14: by Judi (new)

Judi Easley Brendan Sanderson's The Emporer's Soul - All the good guys get to win in the end! It wasn't easy, but they won! It was a very freeing little book and one of my very favorites to read.


message 15: by Karen (new)


message 16: by Kim (new)

Kim Galla Anything Amish. They're uncomplucated and calm.


message 17: by Flávia (new)

Flávia I really enjoyed reading "The Perks of being a Wallflower", it was comforting in a way. When I'm not feeling very well or anxiety kicks in, I find it very helpful to read poetry and poems/songs from Tolkien's works (and sometimes rereading The Hobbit). I especially enjoy reading Leonard Cohen's poetry, as it's usually what helps me the most (and listening to his songs, of course).


message 18: by Ulla (new)

Ulla Self-help and spirituality books by Gregg Braden, Louise L. Hay and Wayne W. Dyer.
I especially want to mention Braden's The Lost Mode of Prayer and Secrets of the Lost Mode of Prayer: The Hidden Power of Beauty, Blessings, Wisdom, and Hurt. Scientifically grounded and it works for me!


message 19: by Gretchen (new)

Gretchen James Herriot's books make me feel like the earth is maybe an OK place. His books have a strong sense of humanity.


message 20: by Callis (new)

Callis toloving great..


message 21: by Mike (new)

Mike Finn The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

For booklovers everywhere.


message 22: by Zsofia (new)

Zsofia Nemes Rebecca wrote: "haha the history of love should obviously be on this liest!"
YES!


message 23: by Maria (new)

Maria Recent ones I read which I found to be comfort books were "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" by Betty Smith, and "Minding Frankie" by Maeve Binchy. They are stories about people and their daily struggles and how the different characters' paths cross, I find this to be comforting to me.


message 24: by Caroline (last edited Oct 15, 2016 11:30PM) (new)

Caroline So many different books have helped me at various times.


message 25: by Kamelia (new)

Kamelia Cassie wrote: "Pride & Prejudice. All the characters you root for get their happy ending, even after it seemed impossible."
true


message 26: by Marie (new)

Marie Gretchen wrote: "James Herriot's books make me feel like the earth is maybe an OK place. His books have a strong sense of humanity."

Was about to post the same. Like a warm hug. Great company.


message 27: by Riley (last edited Oct 15, 2016 04:26PM) (new)

Riley Eva Ibbotson and Coraline by Neil Gaiman (all of Neil Gaiman's books hold a special place in my heart) but as the start of Coraline says "Fairytales are more than true, not because they tell us dragon's exist, but that they can be beaten" <3


Elizabeth ♛Smart Girls Love Trashy Books♛ This may sound strange, but I read Pink when I was going through a hard time in my life, and seeing everything work out at the end of that book really cheered me up.

Same thing with The Fire-Horse Girl. It made me realize I have to forget my past in order to move on with my life, which is something I'm dealing with right now.


message 29: by Tulika (new)

Tulika Varma When I'm sad or down I like to read sweet and soft stories. I even re-read those. But at times I read some hardcore books too.
Those I read and re-read are ---- Thanks For The Memories by Cecelia Ahern
I've Got Your Number by Sophie Kinsella.
Also like "Dr. Charlotte Stone Series by Karen Robards", "The Order Of The Sanguines Series by James Rollins and Rebecca Cantrell".


message 30: by Landree (new)

Landree Rennpage The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

anything by Jane Austen, definitely

and a beautiful and tragic romance:
Anna Dressed in Blood and Girl of Nightmares by Kendare Blake.


message 31: by Krista (new)

Krista This Is How: Surviving What You Think You Can't, by Augusten Burroughs, and The Silver Linings Playbook, by Matthew Quick


message 32: by Christie (new)

Christie Little Women is probably one of the main reasons I'm still alive. There was a year there, when I was in middle school, when I read it once every month, because it had become a safe haven for me. The messages it teaches have helped me to keep going even now.


message 33: by Natalie (new)

Natalie Pond Horseradish by Lemony Snicket is smart and simple...and it contains bits of wisdom that help in trying times...


message 34: by Pearl (new)

Pearl the guernsey literary and potato society


message 35: by Pearl (new)

Pearl Wonder - by Palacio R J
This precept of Auggie really moved me -
“AUGUST PULLMAN'S PRECEPT Everyone deserves a standing ovation because we all overcometh the world. --Auggie


message 36: by Bitbits (new)

Bitbits Wonder - Palacio RJ

A must read book for parents and kids.
Once you read it you'll grow each page


message 37: by Doug (new)

Doug Hemmings Ordinary People by Judith Guest. The book and the movie acted as therapy to me.


message 38: by CJ (new)

CJ Alexis wrote: "Sara wrote:
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

+1000!

I'm going to add... Howl's Moving Castle (Howl's Moving Castle, #1) by Diana Wynne Jones, which is a surprisingly thoughtful adventure that always makes me cozy."


YES. Howl and Sophie...so comforting!


message 40: by Priscilla (new)

Priscilla Asir The Shack By Willaim p Young


message 41: by LouLouReads (new)

LouLouReads Gilead by Marilynne Robinson is the book that has fulfilled this role in my life most recently.


message 42: by Richard (new)

Richard Epstein Wretched, irrelevant recommendations, with no cognizable connection to my tastes or interests.


message 43: by Mike (new)

Mike I'd chime in with Wodehouse. The Jeeves stories always serve to remind me that no matter what, Bertie is still out there bumbling along and it'll all get fixed in the end.


message 44: by TL (new)

TL My contribution: anything by Kate Morton and Carlos Ruiz Zafon


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