Readers' Most Anticipated Books of 2023

Posted by Cybil on December 12, 2022
big books of spring 2020


Good news, Goodreaders: 2023 is shaping up to be a very busy year for dedicated book people.
 
At the end of each calendar year, the Goodreads editorial team takes a look at the upcoming books that are being published in the U.S. We also track early reviews and crunch the numbers on how many readers are adding these books to their Want to Read shelves. All of that information ultimately fuels our curated list of the most anticipated new releases of the coming year.
 
Some of the many, many highlights: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah may have the buzziest book of the year with Chain Gang All Stars, an assault on America’s privatized prison system by way of ferocious, dystopian science fiction. R.F. Kuang calls out cultural appropriation in the publishing business with the contemporary drama Yellowface. And Brandon Taylor continues his keenly observed chronicle of 21st-century life with The Late Americans.
 
Also on deck: new fiction from Charles Frazier, Rebecca Makkai, and Ann Napolitano, along with a number of very buzzy debut novels. Mystery fans can expect new conundrums in Victorian London, contemporary New Delhi, and a deadly cliffside in Australia, along with some Southern noir from S.A. Cosby.
 
SFF people, watch for some fascinating new approaches to dark academia, eco sci-fi, and Canadian witches. Plus a highly anticipated new novel steeped in Indian mythology from Salman Rushdie.
 
We’re also tracking the most anticipated new books in horror, romance, young adult, and a very busy season for nonfiction. Oh, and a long-awaited memoir from a certain Duke of Sussex.
 
Be sure to add anything that catches your eye to your Want to Read shelf, and let us know what you're reading and recommending in the comments.
 
FICTION


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Comedian, essayist, and screenwriter Monica Heisey makes her novel-length debut with the tragicomic story of Maggie, the Surprisingly Young Divorcée. Her marriage lasted only 608 days, and her graduate work is a slow-motion trainwreck, but Maggie is, you know, fine. Really good, actually. Word on Industry Street is that this book is very funny, indeed.

Release date: January 17


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Born and raised in London to Ghanaian parents, Jessica George writes with wisdom and wit in this debut novel about the liminal space between cultures. Lovable heroine Maddie Wright has a dead-end office job and a dad ill with Parkinson’s disease. When her mom returns from Ghana for a year, Maddie takes a break, finds a flat, and starts living her life.

Release date: January 31


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This internationally bestselling debut finally gets its U.S. publication date in February. Toggling between three timelines (2017, 1980, and 1971), this novel tells the story of three women whose lives are bound together by a long-lost letter, a mother’s love, and a secret network of women fighting for the right to bodily autonomy.

Release date: February 7


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In this debut novel, a Puerto Rican family in Staten Island discovers that their long‑missing sister is potentially alive—and cast on a reality TV show—and set out to bring her home. Early reviews are calling the story "poignant and hilarious," with dashes of mystery and intrigue. 

Release date: March 7


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Author Charles Frazier (Cold Mountain) specializes in a thrilling, literary approach to American historical fiction. His latest novel concerns a small town in Depression-era Wyoming, a missing painting, a runaway wife, and a spirited chase that rumbles from San Francisco to Florida. Expect finely drawn characters, state-of-the-art storytelling, and maybe some contemporary relevance.

Release date: April 11


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In this anticipated follow-up to her 2020 bestseller, Dear Edward, author Ann Napolitano introduces young couple Julia Padavano and William Waters, who seem to have that most coveted of blessings: a shot at real happiness. But when darkness from William’s past threatens Julia and her family, we’re asked to consider the uncomfortable question: Can love really overcome anything?

Release date: March 14


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Mary Beth Keane (Ask Again, Yes) returns to shelves with a carefully observed profile of a marriage in peril. Bar owner Malcolm and lawyer Jess are running out of time—for having a child, for planning a future. Keane’s story charts one fateful week when a secret is revealed, a massive blizzard descends, and everything changes for regulars at the beloved Half Moon bar.

Release date: May 2


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Clover Brooks is a death doula, dedicated to helping the dying peacefully navigate passage from this life to whatever comes next. When a desperate woman makes a special request, Clover takes a cross-country trip to complete one love story and maybe start another. Author Mikki Brammer’s empathetic debut novel is recommended for fans of The Midnight Library.

Release date: May 9


 
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Twentysomething author R.F. Kuang (The Poppy War series) initiates a flanking attack on the publishing industry with this story of a white writer who steals the manuscript of a recently deceased Asian American author, then passes it off as her own. Widely praised for her fantasy novels, Kuang takes on real-world themes like cultural appropriation with this highly anticipated novel, slated for a May release.

Release date: May 16


 
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Set in the coffeehouses and classrooms of Iowa City, The Late Americans follows a group of young creatives—that’s a noun now, apparently—as they stumble their way into functional adulthood. Author Brandon Taylor (Real Life) explores the dynamics of the “found family” during that time of life when your friends are the most important people in your world.

Release date: May 23


MYSTERY & THRILLER


 
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Five people are dead in the surreal aftermath of a violent 3 a.m. incident in New Delhi. From here, author Deepti Kapoor’s sprawling crime fiction epic only gets deeper and darker. A profile of the feared Wadia crime family, Age of Vice promises action and intrigue, romance and betrayal, wealth and corruption—all set in the shadowy corners of contemporary India.

Release date: January 3


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Isabelle Drake hasn’t slept in a year. Aside from strange blackouts, she’s been in a state of severe insomnia since her toddler was stolen from his crib in the middle of the night. As the case turns cold, Isabelle turns to a shady true-crime podcaster for help. That’s when things really get dark in this tense thriller from Stacy Willingham (A Flicker in the Dark).

Release date: January 10


 
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From the author of The Great Believers—a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book AwardI Have Some Questions for You follows a 40-something mom as she returns to teach at her childhood boarding school, site of a terrible tragedy. Part murder mystery, part character study, Makkai’s book is one of the season’s most anticipated. 

Release date: February 21


 
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This one looks pretty great: Author Sarah Penner finds the sweet spot of historical mystery with a tale of Victorian spiritualism, Parisian alleyways, and murder most foul. World-famous spiritualist Vaudeline D’Allaire can conjure the spirits of murder victims, it’s said. Can she help desperate Londoner Lenna Wickes find her sister’s killer? It's good clean occult fun from the author of the The Lost Apothecary.

Release date: March 21



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Just in from the domestic suspense bureau: The Soulmate relates the curious case of Gabe and Pippa Gerard, who have just bought their dream house, a cottage outside Melbourne, Australia. The trouble begins with a nearby cliffside location known as the Spot, where people go to commit suicide. Gabe is spending a lot of time there. He’s not jumping, but other people are.

Release date: April 4



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Southern noir specialist S.A. Cosby (Razorblade Tears) is back with his unique brand of high-octane crime fiction. Titus Crowne is a former FBI agent recently elected sheriff of a small town. When a school shooting shatters the community, Titus must endure the trials of being a Black man in a police uniform in the American South.

Release date: June 6



FANTASY

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The hugely anticipated follow up to author Leigh Bardugo’s smash hit Ninth House, the sequel story Hell Bent finds young Alex Stern tasked with retrieving a soul from beyond the gates of the underworld. Expect sinister artifacts, eldritch tomes, dubious allies, occult rituals, and a puckishly subversive take on elite higher education. Dark academia has never been so much fun.

Release date: January 10


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Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is one of our greatest living writers, and his new novel looks frankly amazing. A young girl in 14th-century India becomes a vessel of the goddess Parvati, then spends 250 years building a city-empire of magic. Victory City promises literary fantasy of the highest order, in a tale stylized to read like the translation of an ancient epic. Get well soon, Sir Rushdie.

Release date: February 7


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Canadian author Cherie Dimaline (The Marrow Thieves) introduces Lucky St. James, a Métis millennial who stumbles upon a modern-day coven. Their plan, entirely sensible, is to restore women to their rightful place of power in the world. Their problem, entirely predictable, is a patriarchal witch hunter with deadly intentions. VenCo is recommended for fans of The Once and Future Witches and Practical Magic.

Release date: February 7


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Roshani Chokshi, beloved for her YA books steeped in world mythology and folklore, makes her debut in the adult market with this Gothic tale of mystery and dark romance. A bride with a shadowy past. A groom with a curious heart. A crumbling manor with a terrible secret—several of them, actually. It all adds up to a marriage with…issues.

Release date: February 14


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From the author of The House in the Cerulean Sea, this intriguing cross-genre tale plays in the waters of fantasy and sci-fi both, with damaged humans and conflicted androids questing through otherworldly domains to the City of Electric Dreams. Klune’s standalone story is inspired in part by Pinocchio, and you might find echoes of classic adventure tales and modern mythology like, say, WALL-E.

Release date: April 25 


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The writer of the beloved Murderbot Diaries series returns in 2023 with her first fantasy novel in more than a decade. Here, a demon from the underworld awakens after being murdered to find a lesser mage attempting to steal his magic. You know, typical day-at-the-office stuff.  

Release date: May 30



 
SCIENCE FICTION
 
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In the not-so-distant future of global warming and climate refugees, one young woman agrees to scout ahead to a U.S. facility in the far north of Canada. What’s up with the cadre of elite women soldiers? And the climate research station? And the underground activity? Michelle Min Sterling’s debut is climate fiction with some urgent questions about gender, class, race, and the politics of catastrophe.  

Release date: April 4


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A ferocious attack on America’s for-profit prison systems, Chain Gang All Stars depicts a dystopian future of gladiatorial spectator sports in which female prisoners fight in mandatory death matches for a shot at freedom. Thurwar and Staxxx, teammates and lovers, struggle against the system from within, while an imminent revolution simmers just outside the prison-arena gates.

Release date: April 4


 
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Here’s a compelling premise: When a colossal snow-covered mountain appears in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, scientists find themselves rethinking basic tenets of geology and physics. Harold Tunmore and his team are dispatched to scale the mountain, where time dilation turns hours into days, and something monstrous is slithering around in the snow.  

Release date: April 25


 
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On the utopian archipelago of Prospera, rules are rules. Citizens live in paradise until health sensors, embedded in the flesh, drop below 10 percent. Then it’s off on a ferry ride to the island known as the Nursery, where renewal and rejuvenation are promised. Author Justin Cronin (The Passage series) profiles one particular ferryman, who makes some unpleasant discoveries.

Release date: May 2


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In this sci-fi thriller debut, a mission into deep space begins with a lethal explosion that leaves the survivors questioning the loyalty of the crew. On the eve of Earth’s environmental collapse, a single ship carries humanity’s last hope: 80 graduates of an elite program. But halfway to a distant but livable planet, a bomb detonates and suspicions spiral out of control. 

Release date: July 18


HORROR


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Scary story maestro Grady Hendrix (The Final Girl Support Group) broadcasts on a very specific frequency between horror and humor. It’s a tricky tone to maintain, but he always seems to nail it. His latest concerns a pair of estranged siblings forced to sell the family home when their parents die. But why did they cover all the mirrors? And why is the attic door nailed shut?  

Release date: January 17


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In this sequel to his 2021 horror thriller, My Heart Is a Chainsaw, genre ace Stephen Graham Jones returns loyal readers to the rural hamlet of Proofrock. Indigenous serial killer Dark Mill South, seeking revenge for a Dakota massacre in 1862, escapes from prison just as young Jade Daniels returns to town herself. Well, at least there isn’t a blizzard on the way. Oh, wait. There is.

Release date: February 7


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Argentine novelist Mariana Enríquez (Things We Lost in the Fire) writes horror fiction that has been compared with that of genre godmother Shirley Jackson. Her latest represents another dark vision. A grieving father and his young son discover that they’ve inherited a terrible legacy when their extended family turns out to be a cult of brutal vampires. In-laws. It’s always something.

Release date: February 7


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This double Goodreads Choice Awards nominee in horror (for The Ballad of Black Tom and The Changeling) is ready to take his brand of terror to the American West in 1914, where a single woman tries to make her way as a homesteader despite the hindrance of something very terrible that travels in a steamer trunk with her.

Release date: March 21


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Silvia Moreno-Garcia, the genre-shifting author of Mexican Gothic, Gods of Jade and Shadow, and The Daughter of Doctor Moreau, melds together threads of Mexican horror movies and Nazi occultism in her latest tale. This intriguing narrative tells the story of a curse that haunts a legendary lost film...and awakens one woman's hidden powers.

Release date: July 18


NONFICTION


 
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This hugely anticipated memoir from Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, is likely to be one of the year’s biggest books. Advance word suggests that the memoir will address, among other events, the tragic death of Princess Diana, who died when Harry was just 12 years old. As such, proceeds from the book will be shared with various children’s charities around the world.

Release date: January 10


 
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Gentleman madman Edgar Allan Poe is among a handful of writers credited with inventing the modern English-language horror story. This innovative biography uses split timelines to tell the story of Poe’s life and his exceedingly mysterious death. (Poe went missing in Baltimore for a while.) In fact, author Mark Dawidziak presents a new theory on what exactly happened to “the master of the macabre.”

Release date: February 14


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So-called geek culture has saved a lot of lives over the years by providing a home for those who were denied a place elsewhere. Author Joseph Earl Thomas makes a strong case for just how literally this life-saving aspect can be. Abused and neglected as a child, Thomas tells his story in this highly acclaimed memoir, which won the 2020 Chautauqua Janus Prize. Geek love is strong.

Release date: February 21


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If you like wolves—and who doesn’t like wolves?—you’ll want to check out this unique project from author and journalist Erica Berry. By way of science, cultural criticism, and personal history, Berry explores the significance of the wolf in our society, in our art, and even in our dreams. Bonus trivia: Berry has written for both Outside magazine and The Yale Review, which speaks to her bona fides.

Release date: February 21


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Another book we could use right about now, Who Gets Believed? tackles our “post-truth” era from a specific vantage point. Author Dina Nayeri (The Ungrateful Refugee) explores various case studies, both personal and clinical, with an eye toward believability. Whom do we tend to believe, and why? From immigration offices to hospital emergency rooms, the book asks some uncomfortable questions.

Release date: March 7


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From author and journalist Nicole Chung, A Living Remedy takes the traditional memoir in a new direction, exploring the treacherous crosscurrents of class, race, and inequality in America. Chung tells of her upbringing as a Korean adoptee and her terrible grief when her loving parents die in quick succession—largely due to outrageous inequalities in healthcare.

Release date: April 4


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Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times columnist Timothy Egan (The Worst Hard Time) is back with another rigorously researched examination of American history. This time around, Egan tells the story of the Ku Klux Klan at the height of their power and viciousness, and of the impossibly courageous woman who brought them down.

Release date: April 4


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Writer and poet Maggie Smith gets personal in this innovative take on the standard memoir format. Using a series of lyrical vignettes (and a poet’s ear for language), she digs into her own failed marriage and the strange sensations that follow coming of age in your middle age. You Could Make This Place Beautiful is recommended for readers of Deborah Levy, Rachel Cusk, and Gina Frangello.

Release date: April 11


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In 1740, British warship The Wager disappeared while chasing a treasure-filled Spanish galleon. Two years later, a patched-together lifeboat washed up on the shores of Brazil with 30 emaciated survivors. Their story was a sensation until six months later, when another batch of survivors washed ashore—with a different story. Nonfiction ace David Grann (Killers of the Flower Moon) is sooooo good at this kind of thing.

Release date: April 18


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Samantha Irby (Wow, No Thank You and We Are Never Meeting in Real Life) is back this spring with a hilarious new essay collection that takes us into the gory particulars of her real life, from dental troubles to a dalliance with the power of crystals and an addiction to QVC.

Release date: May 16


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Writer David Lipsky made his bones in the publishing world with a pretty great book about five days he spent with author David Foster Wallace (Infinite Jest). In his new investigation, Lipsky tackles the history of climate science, with a focus on the parallel history of climate change denialism. Recommended for fans of the terrifying 2010 exposé Merchants of Doubt.


Release date: July 11


 
ROMANCE
 
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Six years ago, handsome Callahan Kane broke the heart of young Lana Castillo. Full of regret, he pledged never to return to Lake Wisteria. When an inheritance situation changes everything, the lovers must face each other again. Book Three in Lauren Asher’s Dreamland Billionaires series is all about second chances—and partly about how cool the name Callahan Kane is.

Release date: January 31


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Author Tessa Bailey (It Happened One Summer) has been called the “Michelangelo of dirty talk,” and her new book promises additional fine artwork in this general direction. Tightly wound college professor Julian Vos has taken a sabbatical to write his novel at the ancestral family vineyards. But it turns out that old high school flame Hallie Welch is a serious distraction.

Release date: February 7


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Known for her clever, keenly observed fictional twists on both classic literature and real American history, Curtis Sittenfeld (EligibleRodham) now turns her pen to the rom-com subgenre with this aptly titled book. Sally Milz, a sketch writer on an SNL-like comedy show, has always made fun of the whole "gloriously hot woman dates shlubby comedian" phenomenon, given that the reverse never happens. But when she hits it off with gorgeous guest host Noah Brewster, Sally finds that maybe, just maybe, she'll need to eat her words.

Release date: April 11


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The new one from romance author and Food Network star Abby Jimenez introduces Dr. Briana Ortiz, who is about to lose a promotion to her annoyingly hot colleague Jacob Maddox. Then a series of letters between the two flips the dynamic entirely. Also in play: a kidney donation, a “sob closet,” and some freakishly tiny horses.

Release date: April 11


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The inimitable Emily Henry (People We Meet on Vacation) returns with the story of a recently split couple obligated to attend the annual gathering of their old group of friends. Determined not to ruin the vibe, Harriet and Wyn decide to pretend to still be together. Oh, and look! They got the biggest bedroom at the rental cottage!

Release date: April 25


YOUNG ADULT
 
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The wildly prolific Holly Black—winner of a Nebula Award and a Newbery Honor—returns to the world of Elfhame in this first book of a new duology. Devotees of Black’s Folk of the Air series will be happy to hear that the new story follows Jude’s brother Oak and the changeling queen Suren.

Release date: January 3


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Jamaican tour guide Victoria is good at her job—she uses her inborn magic to protect travelers from savage monsters in the jungle. When romance blooms with a tour client, Victoria must make some hard decisions about love, loyalty, and working for her corrupt corporate bosses. Author Lauren Blackwood (Within These Wicked Walls) makes a welcome return.

Release date: February 7


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Sequel to This Woven Kingdom, and the second book in a planned trilogy, These Infinite Threads continues the story of the Alizeh, heir to the Jinn throne, and Kamran, heir to the human throne. Forbidden love is the best kind of love. Tahereh Mafi’s well-regarded series is inspired by Persian folklore and recommended for fans of Leigh Bardugo, Tomi Adeyemi, and Sabaa Tahir.

Release date: February 7

 
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In this buzzy Gothic horror YA debut, Jade Nguyen's visit to her estranged father in Vietnam takes a turn when the decaying French colonial house her Ba is restoring starts giving off seriously creepy vibes. As in ghosts, bad dreams, and literal creepy crawlies. To save her family, Jade must uncover her ancestors' complicated history with the house before it devours them all.

Release date: February 28

 
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Ander Lopez is about to head out for art school when they meet undocumented Santiago Garcia. Can love overcome circumstance, and timing, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement? Set in the Santos Vista neighborhood of San Antonio, Texas, this YA romance from author Jonny Garza Villa tells the story of two young people who find love, just in time.

Release date: April 4

Which books are you most excited to read in 2023? Let us know in the comments!
 

 

Check out more of 2023's most anticipated books:








Comments Showing 1-50 of 381 (381 new)


message 1: by Lyra (new)

Lyra (Cardan’s version) THE STOLEN HEIRRRRR
SO EXCITED
JANUARY IS GOING TO BE A EXPENSIVE MONTH
EEEEEE


message 2: by Jessa Michelle (new)

Jessa Michelle That Horror & Nonfiction section is 😍😍


message 3: by Chiara (new)

Chiara chain of iron!!!!


message 4: by Kerry (last edited Dec 12, 2022 07:29AM) (new)


message 5: by Kendall (new)

Kendall Barnett Woah where is Shannon Chackraborty’s new book!?


message 6: by Carol Musil (new)

Carol Musil It's important to mention that other countries exist, as in not only the US/UK nor only english speaking countries exist. The goodreads community is global and by that only mentioning book releases that just touch such a small part of the community is kind of disappointing. I hope that in future posts these type of concerns are heard.


message 7: by Elentarri (new)

Elentarri New Murderbot (Martha Wells) novel expected in November 2023.


message 8: by Tim (new)

Tim I think all of Sanderson’s novels should be in the fantasy section.


message 9: by Summer (new)

Summer (speaking_bookish) I hope everyone realizes that the books on this list are chosen based on the which books the most users add to their want-to-read pile- they aren’t chosen based on where the books are published or what language they are in. I’m not saying I don’t agree that diversity is always better I just wasn’t sure if everyone knew that the people behind these book choices are actually all of you and anyone else who uses Goodreads not the person sharing the list.


message 10: by Linda (new)

Linda Armstrong There are at least 12-14 that I want to read!!


message 11: by Amber Lynn (new)

Amber Lynn A Day of Fallen Night by Samantha Shannon


message 12: by Grace (new)

Grace Lynch So excited for all the good books in 2023!!!


message 13: by Sofia (new)

Sofia de Castro Sousa Hi Goodreads and readers around the world! I downloaded this app last November and I must say that, thanks to Goodreads, I discovered at least 20 new books and authors. An amazing thing, really. So I thank you for your 2023 list and I added 10 to my “Want to read” list.


message 14: by Grace (new)

Grace Heneks What about Colson Whitehead’s new boom due out May?


message 15: by mar (new)

mar excited for stolen heir and last violent call


message 16: by Ally (new)

Ally O I am extremely excited!


message 17: by Emily (new)

Emily Ander & Santi by Johnny Garza Villa isn't about two boys - it's about a non-binary person and a boy.... Nowhere in the description does it mention that they're both male identifying :/


message 18: by Gerry (new)

Gerry Durisin Hello Beautiful is wonderful! I was lucky to get my hands on an Advance Reader Copy and loved every page of this story.


message 19: by Sera (new)

Sera Nova Can we please have more representation of boys in YA please??? And I know this might sound weird, but specifically straight? I LOVE the lgbt inclusion and diversity, but any new book written about boys, are always lgbt themed. YA Is already heavily aimed at both straight and lgbt girls, but there was already a lack of straight boys, and especially now. How do we help the new generation and adults become sympathetic, empathetic, masculine in a healthy way, and tell them they’re also important too when their is no books for them in their teen and YA years? Juv and adult books are the only ones that have more diversity in this aspect. Cmon YA authors. Stop writing about the same whitchy magical strong girls. I want a boy struggling to find himself, saving his kingdom, falling for a stable girl, or finding a passage to another realm.


message 20: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Kelly They Forgot Lady Tan's Circle of Women, Just Like Home and Vera Wong's unsolicited advice for murderers.


message 21: by Strzelba (new)

Strzelba I’m waiting for four Brandon Sanderson’s Secret Projects and his final Skyward book, it’s going to be a good year :)


message 22: by Aurora (new)

Aurora Books i am excited about arent on the list.


message 23: by Heath (new)

Heath Lightbringer by Pierce Brown!


message 24: by Cátia (new)

Cátia Chambel happy place literally my most anticipated read of next year


message 25: by Maria (new)

Maria Elizabeth Acevedo’s new book!


message 26: by Sharifeh (new)

Sharifeh What about The Perfumist of Paris (The Henna Artist Trilogy #3) by Alka Joshi? I can’t wait to read it! It comes out in 2023!


message 27: by Caroline (new)

Caroline So many interesting books!


message 28: by Hannah (new)

Hannah Personally looking forward to the new Laurell K Hamilton


message 29: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Mohn The next KOTLC book! (Can’t wait for the title and cover!)


A Dreamy Bibliophile Chiara wrote: "chain of iron!!!!"

Exactlyy!!!! I've been waiting for it for so long. I'm super excited for it!


message 31: by Michael (new)

Michael K Would love to see a part two with anticipated poetry publications.


message 32: by Mae (new)

Mae Tyler CANNOT WAIT FOR HELL BENT!!


message 33: by Thea (new)

Thea C Travis Rice, third instalment of the Sapphire Cove series due in March "Sapphire Storm "
and Kate Morton's "Homecoming" due in April


message 34: by Konika (new)

Konika Sharma I wasnt aware of a memoir by Prince Harry so definetely looking forward to it..


message 35: by Will (new)

Will torliness wrote: "It's important to mention that other countries exist, as in not only the US/UK nor only english speaking countries exist. The goodreads community is global and by that only mentioning book releases..."
Unfortunately Goodreads is just a big ol' popularity contest. It's also why the choice awards were filled with books with large communities. It also reflect on the Goodreads team as well. They are all about diversity but they inadvertently made their book selections homogenous.


message 36: by urwa (new)

urwa the scifiction section looks GOATed


message 37: by Tamera (new)

Tamera Pillay Adventures of Amina al-Sirafi by S.A. / Shannon Chakraborty!!


message 38: by Whitney (new)

Whitney torliness wrote: "It's important to mention that other countries exist, as in not only the US/UK nor only english speaking countries exist. The goodreads community is global and by that only mentioning book releases..."

while I agree that other countries exist, they specified at the beginning of the article that they curated the list based on what people are adding to their TBR shelf. The company is based in the US. I'd wager most of the users are based in the US. Thus, you get a bias towards US releases. This isn't to say this methodology isn't flawed; it's just to say that they *were* upfront with how they curated the list, so at that point, part of the blame is with the user base, not necessarily Goodreads themselves. What books are you looking forward to this year?


message 39: by Whitney (new)

Whitney Kelsey wrote: "Can we please have more representation of boys in YA please??? And I know this might sound weird, but specifically straight? I LOVE the lgbt inclusion and diversity, but any new book written about ..."

Hi. There are many straight male protagonists in YA books. I find it weird that you assume a book that has either only a female lead or contains a female co-lead wouldn't be "for boys" or that there is a "lack" of these characters in general.
All My Rage has both a male and female POV protagonist and it won the National Book Award this year.
Beasts of Prey has both a male and female POV protagonist and goes deep into the idea of masculinity vs. toxic masculinity
I Am Number Four
Eragon
Serpent & Dove
half of John Green's YA books, especially if they've been adapted (eg. Looking for Alaska, Paper Towns, An Abundance of Katherines, etc.)
Erin Hahn has some excellent male co-leads in her books More Than Maybe and You'd Be Mine
David Yoon has multiple YA books with a straight male lead
the Scythe series has a great male lead (Shusterman is another great choice. His Unwind series and Roxy were both amazing)
Your challenge this year indicates that you read both All of Us Villains and the spin-off to These Violent Delights and somehow have still come away with the idea that there is a "lack" of straight male characters despite both books having at least one straight male POV, if not more.
Your shelves also indicate you read many manga series, in which the vast majority of them have a straight male protagonist. Working with teens, I assure you, many of them are reading manga and will get representation in that way. We both seem to have hated Chainsaw Man, Vol. 1: Dog And Chainsaw, but the male lead is *aggressively* heterosexual.
While I wouldn't recommend it because the author is transphobic, one of the most popular, enduring YA classics is about a straight male.
MANY, MANY classics that you're forced to read in High School have straight male leads.

Additionally, how do you expect people to "grow in sympathy and empathy" if they *only* read about themselves? Trust me when I say representation is important, but I didn't see myself in a book until I was 20 and I didn't get *good* biracial rep until I was 26. There was *literally* none until 2012. That is insanity.

Teen boys will be just fine reading books about a variety of people, male or not, straight or not, and I think it is an underestimation of them to assume that they will think they "don't matter" unless they make up the majority. They *DO HAVE* representation. It's not like they don't at all. So yes, I do think this is a weird opinion to voice aloud, especially when it's so easily disproven.


René | Divergente chain of thorns


message 41: by Shawn-Joy (new)

Shawn-Joy Martin Two on this whole list that I have marked want to read...I think only one of them will actually make it to my real TBR list.


message 42: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy Can’t wait to to expand my reading to new authors and going to my to read list


The Blue Otter Reads My wallet cries every time I look at one of these lists because I just want to buy everything 😭


message 44: by Joe (new)

Joe I really loved She Started It. I was lucky enough to read an ARC and I thought it was the perfect revenge summer vacation thriller

Definitely deserved to be on this list!


message 45: by Akouto (new)

Akouto Von Ready for Spare!


message 46: by Leisha (new)

Leisha My husband is going to need a second job 😂😂


message 47: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte Martin No new Colleen Hoover?


message 48: by Michael (new)

Michael J. Thanks for putting this together. A great list. I already bookmarked over a dozen as want-to-read.


message 49: by Carole (new)

Carole Whitney wrote: "Kelsey wrote: "Can we please have more representation of boys in YA please??? And I know this might sound weird, but specifically straight? I LOVE the lgbt inclusion and diversity, but any new book..."

You completely missed the point of Kelsey post. She wanted new books and you gave her a list of previously released ones and dismissed her valid point of wanting to read books from a young male POV.
She also didn't ask you to disprove her point or have an opinion on what she would like to read.


message 50: by Mandee (new)

Mandee Seeley Could we get a graphic novel list?


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