6 Great Books Hitting Shelves This Week

Posted by Cybil on December 1, 2020
Need another excuse to treat yourself to a new book this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day.

To create our list, we focused on the books Goodreads members can't wait to read, which we measure by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves. All these top titles are now available in the United States! Which ones catch your eye?
 


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You should read this book if you like: Literary fiction, books with animal characters, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, Paris, runaway racehorses, mischievous ducks, streetwise rats, elegant German shorthaired pointers


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You should read this book if you like: Literary fiction, Irish stories, inspiring heroines, small-town drama, the long-term echoes of The Troubles, Sally Rooney, Ottessa Moshfegh, Milkman, Derry Girls


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You should read this book if you like: Romance, tenacious protagonists, charming strangers in town on business, horny college professors, no-strings-attached hookups, pleasant surprises, dramatic renewal of purpose


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You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, mysteries, adventure stories, doomed arctic expeditions, alternating timelines, infamous murder trials, extraordinary women


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You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, recent American history, incisive criticism on cultural and socioeconomic themes, no-holds-barred discussion of racial and gender issues, So You Want to Talk about Race


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You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, recent American history, explorations of systemic racism, direct engagement with difficult topics, top-shelf cultural criticism, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America


Which new releases are you looking forward to reading? Let's talk books in the comments!

Check out more recent articles, including:
Readers' Most Anticipated Books of December
The Most Anticipated YA Books of December
Steamy Romances to Heat Up December

Comments Showing 1-16 of 16 (16 new)

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message 1: by Rodrigo (new)

Rodrigo E Llamozas 'The arctic fury' just winked at me.


message 2: by Katherine (last edited Dec 01, 2020 03:34AM) (new)

Katherine Hayward Pérez Without a doubt, Big Girl, Small Town Big Girl, Small Town by Michelle Gallen . One of the best books of the year. I had the pleasure of taking part in the blog tour and reviewing the book here on my blog:https://justkatherineblog.wordpress.c...

Happy pub day to Big Girl, Small Town!

I am also looking forward to How to Fail at Flirting How to Fail at Flirting by Denise Williams


message 3: by Raven (new)

Raven Black I had a readers copy of Big Girl, Small Town and totally fell in love with it! I can't wait to read more by this author.


message 4: by Holly (new)

Holly "Just when I thought I was out, they pulled me back......"

I had given up hope that the industry would ever publish a new book that would interest me.......and then Jane Smiley wrote a new racehorse book. Now I'm just waiting for Perestroika in Paris to arrive so I can spend my birthday reading.


Sharnett the Reader Just added How to Fail at Flirting to my list.


message 6: by Savannah (new)

Savannah Lancaster Blah-all these book seem like something I would read in like 5th or 6th grade


message 7: by Ann (new)

Ann ✨Savannah✨ wrote: "Blah-all these book seem like something I would read in like 5th or 6th grade"

i have zero interest as well


message 8: by Savannah (new)

Savannah Lancaster Jade wrote: "Why do white people like to be lectured about how racist they are? I mean, I'm not the only one who thinks that's weird—am I?"
What do you mean?


message 9: by Ann (new)

Ann ✨Savannah✨ wrote: "Jade wrote: "Why do white people like to be lectured about how racist they are? I mean, I'm not the only one who thinks that's weird—am I?"
What do you mean?"


i wondered the same thing


message 10: by Andrew (new)

Andrew If we read only the titles then you'd come away with that thought, but inside the book we learn about all the stuff we people do unconsciously that to our surprise is infuriating to our neighbors.
I learned last year that we men cut off and talk on top of the ladies. Why didn't somebody tell me that in, like, 4th grade? Or that we shouldn't touch a pregnant stranger's belly? Same thing with race. Who knew I shouldn't pat my boss's afro?
Here's another one: I came back from a business trip dumbfounded that my black women colleagues mentioned they would not vaccinate their kids for measles. My own kid told me one word: Tuskegee.
It's a matter of insight that can lead to respect.
Why are there so many books about faith? We don't have to read them all. Only a few pages of any one of them can give insight and resonate.


message 11: by Savannah (new)

Savannah Lancaster Jade wrote: "✨Savannah✨ wrote: "Jade wrote: "Why do white people like to be lectured about how racist they are? I mean, I'm not the only one who thinks that's weird—am I?"
What do you mean?"

The last two books..."

Not all white people are racist, why does everyone think that. If you actually get to know people you could find that they are way better then the come off as.


message 12: by Amy (new)

Amy Jade and Savannah,
How many of these books have you read? https://www.nypl.org/blog/2020/06/09/...

If you have not read many of them, this is an excellent list to use to make yourself better educated and more aware of the place that racism plays in our history and our current life.

It's not about saying all white people are racists, or that any people are "bad", it is about educating ourselves and each other about the ongoing effects of 200+ years of slavery, and the institutional racism that followed. It's something everyone needs to understand.

And different scholars and authors have different ideas on the subject, because it is complicated, and because not everyone agrees -- that's why there are a lot of books.


message 13: by Savannah (new)

Savannah Lancaster Amy wrote: "Jade and Savannah,
How many of these books have you read? https://www.nypl.org/blog/2020/06/09/...

If you have not read many of them, this is an excellen..."

Are you talking about the link you provided or the 6 books in this discussion?


message 14: by Savannah (new)

Savannah Lancaster Jade wrote: "Amy wrote: "Jade and Savannah,
How many of these books have you read? https://www.nypl.org/blog/2020/06/09/...

If you have not read many of them, this is..."


Great way to respond honestly, I’ve always felt that way whenever I try reading books like that, I tend to start thinking there very biased and not seeing the whole point.


message 15: by John (new)

John Look, if you don't want to get another person's perspective because yours is infallible, if you don't feel that you should try to educate yourself as the world changes, if you don't believe that one's privilege creates a moral obligation to listen to others less/differently privileged... then don't read it.

For those who do read it, generally speaking, it's not self-flagellation. It's an open-mindedness to things that may not be fun to hear, but are still worth hearing.

And if I end up not being convinced by a given premise, well, I'd still rather read something and then disagree with it, than preemptively disagree and never expose myself to other perspectives at all.


message 16: by Melinda (new)

Melinda John wrote: "Look, if you don't want to get another person's perspective because yours is infallible, if you don't feel that you should try to educate yourself as the world changes, if you don't believe that on..."

Perfectly stated. Thank you.


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