52 New Books by Hispanic and Latinx Authors to Read Now

Posted by Cybil on September 15, 2020


Hispanic Heritage Month is the perfect time to relish the latest works from beloved Hispanic and Latinx authors like Isabel Allende, Natalia Sylvester, and Julia Alvarez, as well as to discover debut writers such as Gabriella BurnhamIsabel Ibañez, and Aiden Thomas.

All the books here are published in the U.S. this year, and this list includes something for every type of reading mood: romance, horror, science fiction, literary fiction, and nonfiction. We also devoted a section below to highlight the many exciting young adult books published this year.
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Young Adult

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Do you have a great book recommendation to share with your fellow readers? Add it in the comments below!

Check out more recent articles:
The Big Books of Fall
9 Books that Goodreads Editors Highly Recommend
30 Summer Debut Novels You May Have Missed

Comments Showing 1-50 of 95 (95 new)


message 1: by Lourdes (new)

Lourdes Cabezon Me alegra mucho ver que celebran la herencia cultural hispana, ya que somos 600 millones de hispanohablantes. Les agradecería que incluyeran dos novelas históricas, la primera sobre Cuba, la segunda sobre el periodo entre 1789 y 1840, más o menos de la historia de la España de ambos mundos. Son " yo nací en Camagüey" y "el caso Alvear" , gracias.


message 2: by David (new)

David Spanish from Spain = french = german = italian ... Are all of them hispanic (US concept)?


message 3: by Leslie (new)

Leslie Dykeman Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks


message 4: by Steven (new)

Steven Howard I highly recommend When Strong Women Speak, Strong Women Listen by Adriana Fuentes Diaz. She's a first-time author from Mexico City.

Just released, this book has over 800+ motivational and inspirational quotes from successful women throughout the ages.

See my review of this book here on Goodreads.


message 5: by Daisy (new)

Daisy Ortiz Leslie wrote: "Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks"

Instead of using the masculine and feminine endings (Latino or Latina), the current use is "x" to denote both genders.


message 6: by Emma (new)

Emma Lindsey Leslie wrote: "Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks"
I believe it is a gender inclusive term


message 7: by Holly Westrick (new)

Holly Westrick Where are the kids books


message 8: by John (new)

John David Ferrer Please consider the novel of historical fiction The Shape of Courage ,published in March 2020.

Please don’t use the word Latinx, since it doesn’t exist in either English or Spanish. Check your dictionaries for each language.The Shape of Courage: A novel

Thanks


message 9: by Lgreeley (new)

Lgreeley I recommend Cuban American writer, Teresa Bevin, who’s written several books in English starting with Havana Split. An excellent writer!


message 10: by M (new)

M Leslie wrote: "Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks"

"Latinx" is a word created by the LGBTQ+ community to replace "latino" and "latina". Spanish, like French and Italian, assigns a gender to nouns and adjectives. For example, "fiesta" (festival, celebration) is a feminine noun, while "huevo" (egg) is masculine. Latinx is intended to be gender-neutral. However, English already possesses gender-neutral words: "Latin" and "hispanic".


message 11: by Favi (new)

Favi Lil' Libros by Patty Rodriguez are great children's books.


carleton R falzone what is...'latinx'?


message 13: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Monroy I’m Mexican -American and I don’t like to be called Hispanic or Latinx, I prefer Latina or Chicana, period. People need to stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Some things are better left Untouched.


message 14: by Paul (new)

Paul Meyer Holly Westrick wrote: "Where are the kids books"

Hello Holly, I wrote an award winning children's graphic novel that you may want to take a look at- https://www.underthecottonwoodtree.com/


message 15: by Samantha (last edited Sep 15, 2020 08:20AM) (new)

Samantha From Bing Search - a person of Latin American origin or descent (used as a gender-neutral or nonbinary alternative to Latino or Latina)


message 16: by Rosa (new)

Rosa David wrote: "Spanish from Spain = french = german = italian ... Are all of them hispanic (US concept)?"

Maybe this video will help clarify things: https://youtu.be/gs2tdjzla8Y


message 17: by Luisa (new)

Luisa From Pew Research:

https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/...

Maybe Goodreads could survey its authors' preference.


carleton R falzone Lisa wrote: "I’m Mexican -American and I don’t like to be called Hispanic or Latinx, I prefer Latina or Chicana, period. People need to stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Some things are better left Untouched."

+1


message 19: by limell lawson (new)

limell lawson Leslie wrote: "Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks"

Using an “x” instead of a gender specific “o” or “a” is a way to avoid having to write out both words. E.g. latino and latina... or just go for latinx. I’ve also seen the clever latin@ (which gets the “o” and the “a” both in with one character).


message 20: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Townsend-Lyon Success Reinvention
Harvey Castro
Spanish Version: https://www.amazon.com/Reinventa-Exit...

I highly suggest this amazing self-help book by Dr. Harvey Castro, MD. It reads like a memoir as he shares his personal experiences and shares step by step how to live in happiness and success as you overcome obstacles and accomplish your goals. It is also now available in a Spanish version on Amazon.


message 21: by L (new)

L Lisa wrote: "I’m Mexican -American and I don’t like to be called Hispanic or Latinx, I prefer Latina or Chicana, period. People need to stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Some things are better left Untouched."

Some people are not tied to a specific gender (non binary), so using latinx includes all and are not conformed to the traditional rule of implying that someone is a "man" or "woman".


message 22: by Tony (new)

Tony Brunal Whatever you call yourself,

Welcome all great authors! Share your ideas and stories.

Thanks all,

Tony Brunal


message 23: by Carlos (new)

Carlos Gil Although not listed here, I highly recommend my book The End of Marketing: Humanizing Your Brand in the Age of Social Media and AI, which came out late last year and is especially relevant in today's market.

The End of Marketing: Humanizing Your Brand in the Age of Social Media and AI by Carlos Gil


message 24: by Aspasia (new)

Aspasia Merari javier serra's young adult books


message 25: by Jeaneth (new)

Jeaneth Jeaneth Hola a todos, también les recomiendo mis libros están muy buenos para niños y adultos, todas las edades. Apenas los termine de escribir y me gustaría recibir su apoyo y consejos. Muchas gracias.

https://www.amazon.com/-/es/Jeaneth-R...


message 26: by P (new)

P Lisa wrote: "I’m Mexican -American and I don’t like to be called Hispanic or Latinx, I prefer Latina or Chicana, period. People need to stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Some things are better left Untouched."when i am speaking/writing to or about you i will definitely call you latina or chicana. but if i am speaking/writing about latinos/chicanos/latinas/chicanas in general using a gender general neutral word is probably clearer and easier. especially when using the printed word. in the heading to these recommendations saying '52 new books by hispanic and latina/chicana/latino/chicano authors to read now' would be very awkward. sometimes we need variations of the wheel. using wooden wheels on cars didn't work well so tires were invented.


message 27: by P (new)

P carleton R falzone wrote: "Lisa wrote: "I’m Mexican -American and I don’t like to be called Hispanic or Latinx, I prefer Latina or Chicana, period. People need to stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Some things are better lef..." please see my explanation to lisa. but if i were talking to you directly or speaking about you i would definately say latino or chicano.


message 28: by Ishm4el (new)

Ishm4el Latinx? -facepalm-


message 29: by Ishm4el (new)

Ishm4el M wrote: "Leslie wrote: "Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks"

"Latinx" is a word created by the LGBTQ+ community to replace "latino" and "latina". Spanish, like French and Italian, ass..."


Latino is already gender neutral in Spanish.


message 30: by Jorge (new)

Jorge Ardila Amazing list of books, especially in time for LATINX HERITAGE MONTH (LatinX is gender neutral, Latino/Latina is gender specific - this ain't a debate).

Personally, I'm happy AF to see our stories, our cultures and our writers being showcased and celebrated.


message 31: by Tony (new)

Tony Brunal All,

if any of you would like to review one of my books, please reach out to me via goodreads.

As Time Narrows - Is a story about humanity's last gasp. Years of war, famine and pestilence have eroded the population from a multitude of 8 billion to a barely present 200 thousand. The struggling survivors strewn over multiple continents. The huddled masses have been reduced to little factions; whose sole purpose is to keep on living. Now, after years of watching the skies, a group of scientists have discovered a far off signal that can provide hope.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088SLWH4F
Follow the book with Pinterest .


The Man In The Bowler Hat - Is a story about Detective Christian Santorino. He was not supposed to be here. It's his day off. He can't believe he has to leave his New Year Eve party to investigate a theft at the Metropolitan Museum of art. An Egyptian cross, called the Ankh artifact, has been stolen under heavy security. Christian must crack the connection to the other thefts. Then, when a mysterious man appears on surveillance video, Detective Santorino is duty bound to capture him.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BWCFY1S

Follow the book with Pinterest .



On Sale Now!
The King's Tower - Ava Alexander has just discovered why they are performing so many HLA genotyping’s in her lab in the Yuma desert. She has followed the clues to a solar generation plant next to her facility and the underground sub-facility that hides a morbid secret. Ava is way over her head, but breaking protocol is the only way to be sure. What she finds will shock her. Her intuitions will lead her to a secret government program called The King’s Tower .

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BY2H5V1
Follow the book with Pinterest .



message 32: by Adrianamae (last edited Sep 16, 2020 01:05PM) (new)

Adrianamae Lisa wrote: "I’m Mexican -American and I don’t like to be called Hispanic or Latinx, I prefer Latina or Chicana, period. People need to stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Some things are better left Untouched."

I'm Puerto Rican, nacida y criada en Puerto Rico and I say, "I'm Hispanic." If there's one thing that you can say about Latinos is that we are all different...unless you're talking about abuelas and chancletas, then we're the same. Lol.
I won't use Latinx. It's difficult for me to pronounce with that "x" at the end. Most, if not all, Latinos roll their "r"s and if Spanish is your first language, that X at the end gives trouble.


message 33: by Marina (new)

Marina Viveiros Are portuguese and Italian hispanic or latinx?


message 34: by Marina (new)

Marina Viveiros I'm Hispanic I think


message 35: by Adrianamae (last edited Sep 16, 2020 02:08PM) (new)

Adrianamae Marina wrote: "I'm Hispanic I think"

I'd say we're all Latin, including Italians, Portuguese, Brazilians, Argentinians, etc. etc. etc.. or even descendants from "la raza mediterranea."


Victoria (RedsCat) John wrote: "Please consider the novel of historical fiction The Shape of Courage ,published in March 2020.

Please don’t use the word Latinx, since it doesn’t exist in either English or Spanish. Check your dic..."


The word Latinx does exist, and many people prefer it. You can't make it go away just because you don't like it. It is now included in many dictionaries, for example:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dicti...

PS, This is probably not a good way to promote your own book.


message 37: by abby (new)

abby “When asked about their preferred pan-ethnic term to describe the Hispanic or Latino population, a vast majority of adults say they prefer other terms over Latinx. Only 4%, according to the new survey, prefer Latinx to describe the Hispanic or Latino population.”

Could we maybe listen to people about what terms they prefer instead of deciding for them? Stop trying to make fetch happen.

On this list, I’m most excited to read Mexican Gothic.


message 38: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Marina wrote: "Are portuguese and Italian hispanic or latinx?"

Referring to the AP Stylebook, which most news media uses, "Hispanic" as being from a Spanish-speaking country and "Latino/a" as being from a Latin American Country. Under those definitions, Hispanic would include Spain and any other country where Spanish is a primary language. Latino/a would include Portuguese-speaking Brazil, but not Portugal or the Azores. Those would both perhaps fall under the term Iberian or just plain Portuguese. I've heard older folks use the term "Luso" for Portuguese culture, but it's uncommon. Italian/Italy is not Hispanic or Latinx.

Both terms were manufactured fairly recently. Hispanic was rarely heard before the 1970s when the Nixon Administration pushed for it to be used in the census and on government forms. Latinx has been around since the early 2000s and seems to originally have been meant specifically to describe a subset of the LGBTQ community. It didn't really emerge in mainstream use until right the Pulse nightclub shootings in 2006...probably because many of those murdered in that shooting were both LGBTQ and Hispanic or Latino. As the press adopted the term, the meaning seems to be blurring to make it shorthand for use when talking about a mixed gender group (writers) or when gender is unknown for any reason or when someone prefers not to be identified by gender.

Languages are fluid, except the ones that are extinct. If you think the current rise of Latinx is controversial, you should have been around when Ms was invented. People lost their friggin' minds.


message 39: by realymagico (new)

realymagico A esta lista le agregaría Los hijos de la Diosa Huracán de Daína Chaviano


message 40: by Tony (new)

Tony Brunal All,

Let's talk about the ideas and stories you great authors have. I am sure our cultural bond adds to the flavor of our stories.


Thanks,

Tony Brunal


message 41: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse OK, Goodreads, non-fiction doesn't mean just memoirs. How about stepping up your non-fic game here. A little history, arts, sciences? Something? Anything?


message 42: by Jim (new)

Jim Leslie wrote: "Please explain the use of Latinx and what it means Thanks"

Latinx is poorly defined and not readily recognized term in the Latino, Mexican, and various other Spanish-speaking regions, countries, and locales (among many, many others). It is commonly used by White People, especially White Americans, to make them feel better about being (unacknowledged) racists, by making claims like "I have a Latinx friend", or "I read books by Latinx writers". Like many terms, it has gained popularity because White People refuse to learn something about the massive variety of cultures out in the world, and it makes it easier for them for lump together people who they feel "fit the term". It is accepted, I won't argue that, by many people, but it is hardly definable, clearly.


message 43: by Jim (new)

Jim Yaaresse wrote: "OK, Goodreads, non-fiction doesn't mean just memoirs. How about stepping up your non-fic game here. A little history, arts, sciences? Something? Anything?"

True. How about instead of just pointing it out, you point us to some books too?
:)


Victoria (RedsCat) Yaaresse wrote: "OK, Goodreads, non-fiction doesn't mean just memoirs. How about stepping up your non-fic game here. A little history, arts, sciences? Something? Anything?"

Hi! I'm reading this right now (it comes out 20 Oct). I loved your post above and I think you'll like this:https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5...


Victoria (RedsCat) Yaaresse wrote: "Marina wrote: "Are portuguese and Italian hispanic or latinx?"

Referring to the AP Stylebook, which most news media uses, "Hispanic" as being from a Spanish-speaking country and "Latino/a" as bein..."


Oh yes, people freaked over Ms. It's what I've used since I first heard about it :)


Victoria (RedsCat) abby wrote: "“When asked about their preferred pan-ethnic term to describe the Hispanic or Latino population, a vast majority of adults say they prefer other terms over Latinx. Only 4%, according to the new sur..."
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5...


message 47: by Dywane (new)

Dywane I Love To Read?


message 48: by Jim (new)

Jim Idea: ask someone their name??? Or ask them how they prefer to be labeled, recognized, noted? We are too quick to label people unnecessarily and too quick to respond negatively when someone makes a simple mistake. Fuck #45, please vote for Biden, then protest him until 2024 and then we can get AOC, Tlaib, Omar and fewer old, wealthy white males.


message 49: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Jim wrote:

True. How about instead True. How about instead of just pointing it out, you point us to some books too?
:)
"

Fair enough. Wish I could! I could recommend several things that I thought interesting, but they were all written by old white guys trying to make tenure. That's why I was hoping for ideas from this list. Oh, wait. I can think of one, although it's sort of old. Courage Tastes of Blood by Florencia Mallon. It's about the struggles of the Chilean Mapuche people between 1900-2000.

Seriously, if anyone can suggest some non-fic -- especially about the arts or social sciences of Central and South America -- I'd love some suggestions. They need to be translated into English, though. My Spanish is on the level of a three year old.


message 50: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Victoria (RedsCat) wrote:
Hi! I'm reading this right now (it comes out 20 Oct)....."


Thanks! I'll look for it.


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