July’s Most Anticipated New Releases

Posted by Cybil on July 1, 2020

The must-read summer beach book is a kind of American tradition. The crash of the waves. The glare of the sun. The sand in the pages. Is there anything more rewarding than a really good book on a really hot day? We submit that there is not.
 
New this month: Lindsay Ellis chronicles mankind’s first contact with an alien species. David Mitchell explores the psychedelic rock scene in London, circa 1967. And Alex North provides a portrait of that familiar type we all remember—the creepy kid in grade school. Also: Avenging elk ghosts, murderous sibling rivalry, and the new book from comic Mike Birbiglia.  
 
Each month the Goodreads editorial team takes a look at the books that are being published in the U.S., readers’ early reviews, and how many readers are adding these books to their Want to Read shelves (which is how we measure anticipation). We use the information to curate this list of the hottest new releases.


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Celebrated horror writer Stephen Graham Jones mashes up elements of ghost story and slasher with this tale of four childhood friends from an American Indian reservation. A mistake from the past returns to haunt the men, quite literally, as Jones summons personal and cultural demons from bloody American soil. Also, it turns out that elk can be terrifying.

Check out Goodreads’ interview with Jones here.


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Dark fantasy, witchcraft, and cosmic horror collide in this highly anticipated debut novel from Savannah, Georgia, author Alexis Henderson. Immanuelle Moore lives in the land of Bethel, where the Church reigns supreme and the Prophet’s word is law. But a visit to the forbidden Darkwood changes everything as Immanuelle learns she is part of a powerful lineage under the gibbous moon of witchcraft.


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First contact with aliens has been an obsession with sci-fi writers since the beginning of science fiction itself. Author Lindsay Ellis puts a new spin on the proceedings by folding in all the magic and menace of our Information Age habits—media leaks, internet rumors, and government cover-ups. Also, it turns out that aliens can be complicated.


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Author David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas) is generally acknowledged as one of the planet’s most innovative writers, and his new book goes to some delightfully strange places. It’s the story of Utopia Avenue, British psychedelic rock pioneers in London, circa 1967. How did they end up in an Italian prison? What happened stateside in 1968? Utopia Avenue promises “drugs, thugs, madness, love, sex, death, and art” and it’s hard to argue with that.


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From the mystery-thriller aisle, Samantha Downing’s He Started It crosses the mysterious inheritance template with the subtle dynamics of sibling rivalry. Beth, Portia, and Eddie never really got along as kids. Now they’re back together—with their respective partners—on a road trip to secure an inheritance from a wealthy grandfather. Complicating matters: a missing-person situation from the past, a black truck that keeps following them, and a kinda-sorta dead body in the trunk.

Check out our Q&A with Downing and more of the season’s hottest mystery authors


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A twisty new thriller from the author of The Whisper Man, The Shadows focuses in on a very specific type. Remember that creepy kid from grade school? Dark eyes, menacing vibe? Yeah, that’s Charlie Crabtree, who committed some infamous crimes about 25 years ago. Now childhood friend Paul Adams has returned to his hometown and the past is knock-knock-knocking on the door. Coming home is always so weird.

Check out our Q&A with North and more top mystery writers


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A gripping memoir of speaking truth to power, Notes on a Silencing is the story of the author Lacy Crawford’s experiences at St. Paul’s School, the elite New England institution under state investigation for extensive reports of sexual abuse on campus. Fifteen years after her own traumatic experience, Crawford steps forward as a witness to help tear down the structure of institutional silencing.


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Writer and comedian Mike Birbiglia is a renowned multimedia threat, with a record of sustained funniness on screen, stage, and page. His new book, adapted from his acclaimed one-man show on Broadway, digs into those uncomfortable issues of parenthood that no one talks about. Except Birbiglia does. Thanks to his nuclear-grade likability, Birbiglia can get to places others fear to tread, and his new book is being pitched as an experiment—kind of like a family.

 


Which new releases are you looking forward to reading? Let’s talk books in the comments!

Check out more recent articles, including:
Meet the Authors of Summer’s Hottest Mysteries
July’s Most Anticipated Young Adult Books
The Hottest Romances of July

Comments Showing 1-37 of 37 (37 new)

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message 2: by Saikat (new)

Saikat Any news on Popular Science or Mathematics books, please ?


message 3: by Elentarri (last edited Jul 01, 2020 02:03AM) (new)

Elentarri Saikat wrote: "Any news on Popular Science or Mathematics books, please ?"

Don't hold your breath for that. The best they can do is a history of some science field or biography of someone who vaguely worked in some science-type field.

Some recent science publications for your perusal (I haven't read any so can't comment on them):
~Apocalypse Never - Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All by Michael Shellenberger
~ Entangled Life - How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds & Shape Our Futures by Merlin Sheldrake
~ How Innovation Works - And Why It Flourishes in Freedom by Matt Ridley [not sure how much science is in this]
~Some Assembly Required - Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA by Neil Shubin
~ Virusphere - Ebola, AIDS, Influenza And The Hidden World Of The Virus by Frank Ryan
~ The Body - A Guide For Occupants (Paperback) by Bill Bryson
~ Elephants - Birth, Death and Family in the Land of the Giants by Hannah Mumby
~ Maths on the Back of an Envelope - Clever Ways to (Roughly) Calculate Anything by Rob Eastaway [published 2019]


message 4: by Ryan (new)

Ryan I think as of now, the only title of note, for which I can say is anticipated, is Mastering Meditation: Instructions on Calm Abiding and Mahamudra. I know it was released majorly yesterday (the 30th), but to where I am, is not due to come out until...I think the 2nd or 3rd. I'd have to double-check to make sure.


message 5: by Sue (new)

Sue Frances The Year of the Witching.


message 6: by Gabrielle (new)

Gabrielle These posts are always seriously lacking diverse authors. It’s a shame.


message 7: by Urwa (new)

Urwa why do these posts only consider US authors???


message 8: by Saikat (new)

Saikat Elentarri wrote: "Saikat wrote: "Any news on Popular Science or Mathematics books, please ?"

Don't hold your breath for that. The best they can do is a history of some science field or biography of someone who vagu..."


Hello, my friend

Thank you for your recommendations. My main interest is Mathematics. Do you happen to know where I can get regular updates in Mathematical writing ? Any book lists or anything of the like ?

There seem to be a lot of newsletters about Nature writing, Non Fiction, Travel writing, Science Writing and even Physics books ... but I haven't found any on Mathematics


message 9: by Jim (new)

Jim Or What You Will by Jo Walton
Flyaway by Kathleen Jennings
A Peculiar Peril by Jeff VanderMeer
Pew by Catherine Lacey
Wonderland by Zoje Stage
Afterland by Lauren Beukes
The Relentless Moon by Mary Robinette Kowal
Malorie by Josh Malerman


message 10: by Mike (new)

Mike Collins The brilliant Jasper Fforde’s ‘The Constant Rabbit’, out tomorrow (2nd July).


message 11: by Christine (new)

Christine Entered to win a copy of The Only Good Indians. fingers crossed!


message 12: by Peter (last edited Jul 01, 2020 01:32PM) (new)

Peter Cornwell Does this list includes only US authors?! The Piaget’s Last Fear by that Serbian fellow is perfect match for this (covid19) July "cruel summer" read. A perfect match!


message 13: by Peter (new)

Peter Cornwell And regarding this list of July’s Most Anticipated New Releases, nothing draws my attentions. I read all new releases introductions and it all looks "déjà vu" to me. Already seen.


message 14: by Catherine (new)

Catherine The Constant Rabbit by Jasper Fforde, hoping it will be on my doormat tomorrow!


message 15: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Gabrielle wrote: "These posts are always seriously lacking diverse authors. It’s a shame."

Diverse authors? Are You familiar with Stephen Graham Jones, the author of "The Only Good Indians?" It's the first book on the list.


message 16: by Claire (new)

Claire Messner The New One & Notes on a Silencing are both being added to my Want To Read list!


message 17: by Elentarri (new)

Elentarri Saikat wrote: ...."

Try this site: https://anynewbooks.com/
You can set it up to select only the mathematics option. You get an email once a week that lists all the new books on that topic.


The FountainPenDiva, Old school geek chick and lover of teddy bears Gabrielle wrote: "These posts are always seriously lacking diverse authors. It’s a shame."

I totally agree. That's why I side-eyed all the Black Lives Matter performative "wokeness". It's like they don't know that diverse books - especially books that aren't issue oriented trauma porn - do exist.


message 19: by Elisabeth (new)

Elisabeth I’ve had The Only Good Indians and The Shadows on preorder for like 6 months now. Party time...! 🤓 Utopia Avenue looks intriguing, I think I might just have to check that one out as well. X!


message 20: by readwithjamie (new)

readwithjamie Running by Natalia Sylvester!


message 21: by Pristine (new)

Pristine On July 7, The Peasant's Dream by Melanie Dickerson comes out! I can't wait to read that!


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

I have "Their Last Secret by Rick Mofina" pre-ordered with ETA of July 28/20 if it's not delayed by Covid-19 as are so many others!


message 23: by Richann (new)

Richann Haxton Urwa wrote: "why do these posts only consider US authors???"

I did a little research and found that not to be the case. Take Utopia Avenue by David Mitchel, for instance:

"David Mitchell was born in Southport, Merseyside, in England, raised in Malvern, Worcestershire, and educated at the University of Kent, studying for a degree in English and American Literature followed by an M.A. in Comparative Literature. He lived for a year in Sicily, then moved to Hiroshima, Japan, where he taught English to technical students for eight years, before returning to England. After another stint in Japan, he currently lives in Ireland with his wife Keiko and their two children."

And perhaps there are others.


message 24: by Beth (new)

Beth Roberts I'm sorry, I read books that sound amazing to ME, not based on who the author is. I could care less what they look like, their gender, where they come from or *gasp* their sexual preference. I read for pleasure and escapism and occasionally, sheer information.

That being said, I have been waiting for MONTHS for The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones (Native American, Blackfeet). I'm eagerly anticipating a pre-order of Blacktop Wasteland by S. A. Cosby (BIPOC). Also, I'm awaiting my copy of Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Hispanic). And one of my favorite authors of all time is Seanan McGuire, who is LGBTQIA, but doesn't have a book out this month.

What I'm trying to say is, if you read a lot because you love books, you will find yourself reading diversely and not preaching about the diversity of everyone else, especially random, meaningless lists.


message 25: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Beth wrote: "I'm sorry, I read books that sound amazing to ME, not based on who the author is. I could care less what they look like, their gender, where they come from or *gasp* their sexual preference. I read..."

And that's how you should be with literature. If one reads enough over a decent period of time, diversity will usually come naturally as a by-product. Especially if the literary tastes of oneself are varied themselves, not only to genre and age but also to culture.


message 26: by Abi (new)

Abi You can tell just by this list that Goodreads is owned by Amazon


message 27: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Abi wrote: "You can tell just by this list that Goodreads is owned by Amazon"

Well either that or someone with a shotty sense of literature. Even if they weren't, it's hard to properly tell sometimes.


message 28: by ClaraBelle (new)

ClaraBelle Abi wrote: "You can tell just by this list that Goodreads is owned by Amazon"

Yes you can sadly


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

Ryan wrote: "Abi wrote: "You can tell just by this list that Goodreads is owned by Amazon"

Well either that or someone with a shotty sense of literature. Even if they weren't, it's hard to properly tell someti..."


I think that before anyone makes a comment on a list they should go back to the beginning of the article and read the criteria given for eligibility of any book to be included in that list. Might make for fewer negative comments. And to be nice and for everyone's convenience here's a quote from the start of this article -

"Each month the Goodreads editorial team takes a look at the books that are being published in the U.S., readers’ early reviews, and how many readers are adding these books to their Want to Read shelves (which is how we measure anticipation). We use the information to curate this list of the hottest new releases."

Yeah and I know Goodreads is owned by Amazon but so what. Everything that isn't owned by Amazon is owned by Google, Apple or Microsoft anyway!


message 30: by Deanna (new)

Deanna King Beth wrote: "I'm sorry, I read books that sound amazing to ME, not based on who the author is. I could care less what they look like, their gender, where they come from or *gasp* their sexual preference. I read..."

Look my books up- I'd love for you to read my work- Deannakingwriting.com


message 31: by Cindy (new)

Cindy This just was released today!!! https://www.harpercollins.com/9780063...


message 32: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Kelly Gabrielle wrote: "These posts are always seriously lacking diverse authors. It’s a shame."

Stephen Graham Jones is a Native American author, if that helps.


message 33: by Liz (new)

Liz Beth wrote: "I'm sorry, I read books that sound amazing to ME, not based on who the author is. I could care less what they look like, their gender, where they come from or *gasp* their sexual preference. I read..."

Agreed. Thank you for stating that so openly, and without dragging every issue under the sun into it. Well said.


message 34: by Dominique Owens (new)

Dominique Owens Dominique Owen's


message 35: by Sandra (new)

Sandra Beth wrote: "I'm sorry, I read books that sound amazing to ME, not based on who the author is. I could care less what they look like, their gender, where they come from or *gasp* their sexual preference. I read..."

I agree with you totally!


message 36: by Robyn (new)

Robyn Christine wrote: "Entered to win a copy of The Only Good Indians. fingers crossed!"

ME TOO!


message 37: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Hope Jim wrote: "Or What You Will by Jo Walton
Flyaway by Kathleen Jennings
A Peculiar Peril by Jeff VanderMeer
Pew by Catherine Lacey
Wonderland by Zoje Stage
Afterland by Lauren Beukes
The Relentless Moon by Mary..."



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