A Behind the Scenes Look at Jenny Han's NY Screening of 'To All The Boys I've Loved Before'

Posted by Marie on August 18, 2018
In anticipation of the weekend's Netflix premiere of To All the Boys I've Loved Before, Goodreads met up with author Jenny Han at an advanced screening of her hit YA rom-com in New York. After the film, Goodreads Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Khuri Chandler moderated a panel that included star Lana Condor, director Susan Johnson, and of course, Jenny Han herself.

Below are a few highlights from the event. Don't forget to add Han's book to your Want to Read shelf before tuning into the adaptation!


This post is sponsored by To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before.



Comments Showing 1-39 of 39 (39 new)

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message 1: by inah (new)

inah Honestly , I am disappointed with the cast .but still just looking forward to it .


message 2: by Rachel 007 (new)

Rachel 007 Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to YA moviea? Seriously...recen..."

The All the Bright Places movie casted a Black guy as the love interest. Making progress, slowly I guess. People are mad because he's not the white kid described in the book but I'm still excited- the kid can act.


message 3: by Sam (last edited Aug 18, 2018 01:14PM) (new)

Sam Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to YA moviea? Seriously...recen..."
I hate to sound bitchy. But if the kid was white in the book, why should it matter if he's white in the movie, it makes more sense. I'm all for people of other ethnicities to have roles in YA movies, but if they are white orginally, why change that?


message 4: by Kay (new)

Kay Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to YA moviea? Seriously...recen..."

Because Peter is white in the book. Just because Lara Jean is Asian doesn't mean she HAS to only date Asians.


message 5: by Sam (new)

Sam Aurora wrote: "Also, if everyone is fighting for representation,,why isnt a half asian actress the main character, but instead a full asian girl is?"

Why does it even matter? Why can't she be full Asian, the point your trying to make doesn't even make sense.


message 6: by Sera ~ Catty Reader (last edited Aug 18, 2018 03:10PM) (new)

Sera ~ Catty Reader Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to YA moviea? Seriously...recen..."

People like you will never be happy, no matter what they do. I hate to break it to you, but white people still exist. I'm getting tired of the attitude that putting any white person in anything ever is now considered racist. How is that concept alone not racist? Oh right, because according to people like you that doesn't exist *eye roll*. Please find a hobby, get over yourself and stop turning innocent blog posts about nothing into racial issues.


message 7: by Breslin (new)

Breslin White I don't know if the author herself would call this a young adult book.


message 8: by Sam (last edited Aug 18, 2018 04:22PM) (new)

Sam Aurora wrote: "And when was the last time that an asian girl actually dated an asian guy in a YA movie?"

What does it have to do with being in a movie? Can't a book be enough, and just because you haven't heard of it, doesn't mean it doesn't exist.


Nancy❤The❤Bookaholic While reading the book it clearly states the male character is white and the female character is half Asian. I honestly enjoyed both the book and the movie. I'm an Asian woman and I have a white husband and the fact that this book had interracial partners made it more interesting to me. I think no matter what color you are if you carry yourself the right way you CAN be a romantic lead in a movie.


message 10: by R.S. (new)

R.S. Costa Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to YA moviea? Seriously...recen..."
Bram from Love, Simon is a black jewish romantic interest


message 11: by Kristen (new)

Kristen Just watched the movie and it was really cute!


Mary (I ♥ Books) Aurora, I see your point about male minority characters but delivery could have been better. I am an Asian American mom of both a girl and boy and my husband is black. It’s important for both of them to see themselves represented. I agree there had been more Asian female leads and that male minorities are behind in getting leading roles. However this does not discount how important this book or movie means to Asian American girls. I am in my 40s and finally there is a story that I can completely relate too. This story reflects me more than any other book or movie not just bc she’s part Asian (I’m full) but bc of her ties to her culture and her bond with her family but also bc she’s cares about school and takes intimacy seriously. I applaud Jenny Han for writing what she wanted to see or read about. Read her NYTimes OpEd. Hopefully more male minorities will be writing and directing what they want to see. I hope so.

As for the actress being full Asian and not half — maybe some day we can be that picky. If I was Korean American I would be annoyed that none of the actresses were of Korean descent (I think). It’s ntot perfect but it’s so much better and I only hope it gets better as more minorities are writing their own stories.


message 13: by C.A. (new)

C.A. Aurora wrote: "I am an immigrant jew from russia with dark hair and eyes. Never saw a woman in movies that i could relate to or unserstand :( probably thats why i am not a big fan of either movies of any type or ..."

I kinda agree with you...we need more minority representation in movies not just as a goofy sidekick or a nerdy bully victim. Give them leads! Let them be love interests! And it's definitely lacking in the male department especially.


message 14: by C.A. (last edited Aug 18, 2018 06:42PM) (new)

C.A. I loved the books but the movie was pretty bad.

They left out so many important scenes and the acting was atrocious at times (especially with Gen, Chris, Margot and occasionally even Lara Jean. Peter K's actor did a fine job, though.)

They chose to include some scenes from the sequel which were ill-fitting (the whole hot tub drama and events following) and made the movie plot choppy.

Peter and Lara Jean's relationship development was so weird and practically inexistent. It was like they went to one party, and then months would pass, and then they watched one movie together, and then weeks would pass, and then all the sudden they're confessing their love for each other? They didn't have enough dialogue together to make it realistic at all. I didn't buy it.

The thing with Josh appearing in Lara Jean's room as a figment of her imagination was really weird. Josh's depiction was weird as a whole. They just stripped down his character traits from the book so that he only existed as the boy next door/Margot's ex-boyfriend. They dressed him up like a bad boy when in the books he was a comic book lover, anime club member and Potterhead. I also felt bad for him in the movies when in the books I didn't, which was weird.

They turned Genevieve into your typical teen movie popular mean girl. I cringed when Lara Jean narrated that they used to be best friends until 8th grade when Gen thought she was too popular for her. It just sounded so...Disney Channel. I almost turned off the movie when in that scene in the bathroom Gen revealed that she's hated her all these years for Lara Jean's kissing Peter during spin the bottle, which is NOT what the reason was in the books and makes Gen so much more of a flat, basic antagonist. And don't even get me STARTED on the acting in that scene.

Anyway, the end of the movie at least alluded to a sequel, which I'll still watch regardless.


message 15: by Ashly (last edited Aug 18, 2018 07:33PM) (new)

Ashly Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to YA moviea? Seriously...recen..."

He's white in the book too. Did you read it?

Maybe you should ask the author why she made him white or the director of the movie why she didn't make him black.


message 16: by Ashly (new)

Ashly Aurora wrote: "Representation is important. You have movies and books telling young girls that the only race thats ok to date or consider as romantic leads are Caucasian. Asian boys and african american voys and ..."

Then stick to reading books. Or write your own.


message 17: by Liza (new)

Liza Omg that’s us waiting for the premiere screening!!! The movie was awesome!! We saw the director of Netflix marketing, author, and candor!! It made our day!!


message 18: by Rain (new)

Rain You all middle aged cows complain more than teen girls having their first menstrual cramps.

If you want better representation of males from the minorities, start by buying books that feature them instead of your shitty-smutty books.


Mary (I ♥ Books) No need to be crass and insulting, Lord Zarius. And who says smutty books can’t have representation of diverse chargacters? Why shouldn’t we expect diversity In all genres?


message 20: by Kay (new)

Kay As a biracial Asian, I love that Lara Jean is dating a white guy. I also love books where white girls date Asian guys. I think this is just so amazing how it shows diversity of not just a POC main character (which I absolutely adore of course), but also interracial love. Besides, Lara Jean is both Asian and white. Saying she’s Asian and therefore must date an Asian because of that is sort of erasing half of who she is, which is infuriating to me on a personal level. The fact that this beautifully diverse movie is getting crap for not having a POC love interest while movies that feature a white couple don’t is pretty annoying—we should just be happy that it’s something.

And anyways with Crazy Rich Asians out the same week I’m just thrilled about Asian rep and loving it for what it is.


message 21: by Superbunny (new)

Superbunny just saw the movie, it was irritating as shit. never read the book and i bet the book was worse. also, couldn't they find a better looking (real) asian to play the lead coz her ugly face made the movie so hard to watch. all the sisters look nothing alike. her fake eyelashes did not help. did you see the part where she goes to sleep with full on make up and fake lashes? lol
lara also had the weirdest fashion sense - and no, not in a good way.


message 22: by Kaye (new)

Kaye Cute movie! Loved the book.


message 23: by Avinash (new)

Avinash It's a movie, a freaking movie, not a political statement. I would be nice to see people actually care about real problems instead of this celebrity/pop culture crap.


message 24: by Rain (new)

Rain Gregory wrote: "It's a movie, a freaking movie, not a political statement. I would be nice to see people actually care about real problems instead of this celebrity/pop culture crap."

And yet here you are, blabbering and preaching.


message 25: by Marika (last edited Aug 19, 2018 01:24AM) (new)

Marika If you want to see any given ethnicity represented in a movie or read about it in a book, then why don't you make that movie and write that book? Shouldn't we let others do what they want to do: write their dreams and put on screen what they want to see? Maybe we could stop demanding other people to create our dreams for us. It's not after all their responsability to make our preferences represented. You want something, do it yourself! They have.


message 26: by Megan (new)

Megan not the exact situation where a ya novel with an asian male lead gets adapted into a movie where a male lead is cast, but you might want to check out the following:

edge of seventeen
the new disney channel freaky friday
ki hong lee - the nine lives of chloe king, unbreakable kimmy schmidt


message 27: by Suzie Q (new)

Suzie Q I liked the movie. Granted the book is still on my TBR shelf, so I cannot comment on how closely the movie follows the book. I will say it was cute and very well done. There was Asian representation, African American representation and homosexual representation. Can we just appreciate it for what it was and not how much more that shoulda, woulda, coulda been done?


message 28: by Alex (new)

Alex Actually, the author states in the book that there isn’t a lot of Asian people at the school. She likes Peter. Don’t see what the problem is. It would be inauthentic if she falls in love with an Asian guy just because he’s Asian.


message 29: by Jessica (last edited Aug 19, 2018 07:38AM) (new)

Jessica Aurora wrote: "People werent happy that Scarlett Jo had to play a trans character. I am not happy that a biracial actress had to skip out on a role and no one cares."

The difference here is trans women don't get seen for cis female parts. They can't get through the door to even get auditions. It's not so much who got the part as much as who is getting the OPPORTUNITY to get the part. Scar can read and get a trans role but Laverne Cox won't even be seen for a cis role. That's why people are mad about that. So it's a little bit different. I can't say for sure that any biracial Asian actresses were auditioned for the role of LJ but I'd say they probably were. The Scar Jo anger is about opportunity and lack there of.


message 30: by Sam (new)

Sam Aurora wrote: "Ashly wrote: "Aurora wrote: "Why is the male love interest ALWAYS caucasian when it comes to turning a YA book into a movie? Why had i never seen a minority male as a love interest when it comes to..." Jenny Han made Peter white because she was tired of seen Asian girls only dating Asian boys. It was very intentional.


message 31: by Kristen (new)

Kristen Superbunny wrote: "just saw the movie, it was irritating as shit. never read the book and i bet the book was worse. also, couldn't they find a better looking (real) asian to play the lead coz her ugly face made the m..."

wow. i thought the girl they chose for lara jean was gorgeous and so adorable! not ugly at all.


message 32: by Avinash (new)

Avinash Lord wrote: "Gregory wrote: "It's a movie, a freaking movie, not a political statement. I would be nice to see people actually care about real problems instead of this celebrity/pop culture crap."

And yet here..."

I didn't preach, I shunned.


message 33: by Avinash (new)

Avinash Marika wrote: "If you want to see any given ethnicity represented in a movie or read about it in a book, then why don't you make that movie and write that book? Shouldn't we let others do what they want to do: wr..."

Your expectations will never be met since you are talking to a completely self-centered, inconsiderate crowd. It is their firm belief that the world is actually wrong if it doesn't take their stance. And another thing is that it is super silly that these ignorants are fighting for representation in movies-which at the end of everything, don't matter- while there is no proper representation in their governments.


message 34: by Breslin (new)

Breslin White Aurora wrote: "Lol, almost every author who is a woman and of Asian ethnicity has written a book where asian gal gets a white hero... her story is not new but as old as time itself. "

That is just racist.


message 35: by Breslin (new)

Breslin White I can hardly bear to read the drivel you posted, which is a different thing from reading less than carefully, but you are wrong. "Almost" makes no difference in context (which is what reading entails). You are asserting there is something genetic about these women, that makes them write unsatisfactorily to you. Which is undeniably racist. If you didn't intend to make an assertion about genetics, you should apologize for writing your post the way you did. In fact, several of your posts here target Asian women for writing stories. You are the only one here who is uppity about Asian women writing the stories they want to write.


message 36: by Breslin (new)

Breslin White FYI, racists frequently say they have X family members or X friends after being confronted with their racism. You're not establishing a racist-free mindset, in the least, by making those claims.


Nancy❤The❤Bookaholic Breslin wrote: "I can hardly bear to read the drivel you posted, which is a different thing from reading less than carefully, but you are wrong. "Almost" makes no difference in context (which is what reading entai..."

I totally AGREE!


message 38: by *Sophie* (new)

*Sophie* Aurora wrote: "Also, if everyone is fighting for representation,,why isnt a half asian actress the main character, but instead a full asian girl is?"

Thing is, I’m half Indian but I naturally have red-ish hair and have pale skin. It doesn’t matter what people look like and in this case we have been lucky with the choice of actor. It matters (in books) about how you imagined the character. Of course you are never going to find an actor/actress who is exactly who you pictured so you have to deal with what you have got. And this time we struck gold.


message 39: by *Sophie* (new)

*Sophie* Aurora wrote: "And when was the last time that an asian girl actually dated an asian guy in a YA movie?"

Forget the movies. Look at the books. At my old school we had a quote

“If there’s a book you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”~ Toni Morrison


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