Sarah Jessica Parker’s Next Big Challenge? Book Publishing

Posted by Cybil on June 11, 2018
kids summer reading picks


Actress Sarah Jessica Parker may be best known for her roles on HBO’s Sex and the City and Divorce as well as for being a fashion icon, but she’s also an avid reader and an outspoken advocate for public libraries. Now, she’s taking her love for books a step further with her own literary imprint, SJP for Hogarth, where she’s editorial director. Her imprint’s first book publishes this month, the debut novel A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza.

Parker talked to Goodreads about her love of literary fiction, her imprint’s first novel, and why she’ll only take a selfie with a fan if there’s a library donation involved.

You can also follow Parker on Goodreads for all the latest books that inspire her.


Goodreads: Congratulations on your new imprint. Why did you decide to enter the publishing world as editorial director for SJP for Hogarth?

Sarah Jessica Parker: It wasn’t something that I pondered, ever, in life. It wouldn’t have occurred to me. It all started four years ago when I was invited to a lunch that turned out to be a room of powerful women, leaders of industry. At the end of it, a woman introduced herself to me as Molly Stern [SVP and publisher of Crown and Hogarth], and she was with the author Gillian Flynn. When Flynn’s Gone Girl came out, I had been photographed walking around the streets of New York with it, so they were just saying hello.

Very quickly in the conversation, Molly shared with me that she was about to publish Herman Koch’s The Dinner, and I had been trying for months to get my hands on that book. And it was already out in the U.K. and in Europe, and there was a huge amount of interest around it. And then there was the book’s publisher standing in front of me, and she said she would send it to me.

She sent me this parcel of books. And among those books was a yet-to-be-published book called A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra. And for some reason, that was the book I chose to read first, before The Dinner. I started reading that book, and I was gobsmacked. I couldn’t believe that I was reading a debut novel. I remember emailing Molly and saying, “I’ve never done this before, and I don’t know what I could possibly offer, but I think this might be one of the most important books by a new American author that I’ve read, and I am a reader. If there’s anything I can do to support this book, if I can be helpful, I want to talk about this book.” So we hatched this plan, and I did some interviews to talk about the book and the author.

From that, Molly and I started a book club to read yet-to-be published books to support writers, independent booksellers, and, in my case, to support libraries. We were very involved as a book club for about three years. Toward the end of the third year, Molly and the publishing team at Crown came to me and asked if I would consider starting an imprint.

Goodreads: What was your reaction?

SJP: I immediately said, “No, I can’t, I don’t have those skills. I have too much respect for everybody who does that. Especially, as an avid reader, I’d just feel like I’d have no business.” And they just kept talking to me, and they said, “We disagree, we think you can do this…You love books and you love talking about them, and basically this is another way to support books and writers.”

So, they convinced me. And at a certain point, I just asked if my imprint could be within the Hogarth imprint because I love Hogarth and its history [Hogarth was founded by author Virginia Woolf and her husband, Leonard]. I particularly love literary fiction, which I think is a unique genre. And it’s a very specific way of talking about books and looking at books.

Goodreads: What are you looking for in the books you’ll publish? How often will we see a title from you?

SJP: I think at most it will be four a year. Literary fiction deserves caretaking, and the kind of stories and authors I’m looking for tend to be more global voices about unknown places, cultures, faiths. People whose stories feel foreign in a very compelling and intriguing way. And I think each one of those books deserves real guardianship. The idea of having time to do right by each author who is allowing me the opportunity to be part of that process is really important to me.

I think also because as I am unknown in the world of publishing, it’s not every author who’s willing to take a chance with me. There are all sorts of imprints and houses of publishing that are storied, historic, and legendary, and have all sorts of experience that especially a new author can rely upon. And there are—I’m imagining—legitimate reservations about handing over a book that they’ve spent six, eight, ten years working on to an unknown. So, given that I am assuming that is going to be the case, I can’t promise that I’m going to publish more than that.

It takes time to find submissions that feel right for my imprint…And so this allows me to really examine each choice. So that’s the plan. We have three titles as acquisitions thus far, all of which are really exciting. And certainly, if I use A Constellation of Vital Phenomena as my gold standard, and I do, they all really fit that criteria. They’re all from wonderfully diverse authors—two are women, one’s a man.

Goodreads: Why did you choose A Place for Us as your premiere publication?

SJP: Why not? I feel like, “How lucky am I?” I was barely into the manuscript when I felt this was a really, really special story. By the time I received Fatima’s manuscript, it was in March, and we had been looking for manuscripts since September. So, we’d been reading, really reading. And this book was immediately, apparently special to all of us, not just to me. We were all just undone by what we were experiencing as readers. I just assumed that we wouldn’t get it, I just thought we would never get this, because we all knew. There was activity around that manuscript, you could feel it.

What’s been so exciting is as the advance reader copies have gone out, readers’ reactions to the book have been so enthusiastic. People have embraced the story. A friend of mine yesterday, whom I gave the book to, he texted me and said, “You have to call me, I have to talk to you about this book.” And he said, “I’ve never read a book about a Muslim family in America.” This is a book about an American family, in lots of ways, in all its plurality. But it’s also a book about faith and what it means to be loyal and to honor those you love while also wanting very much to find your own way in the world.

How do you maintain those parts of your faith, your obligation to those you love, and still be an independently thinking person? It’s about love and family, and also about our country. It happens to be a very timely book. How we see each other, what we project onto one another—even within your own family—when faith is playing such an important role. There are so many wonderful examples of how we don’t know each other, even when we are blood.

[Read debut author Fatima Farheen Mirza's notes & highlights for a behind-the-scenes look at her novel]

Goodreads: A Place for Us comes out on June 12. When can readers expect your second publication?

SJP: That’s the only other one I can mention yet. I can’t mention the third! The second one is a Claire Adam book. It’s really beautiful. It’s called Golden Child [the book will go on sale in January 2019]. She’s a gifted writer from the U.K., and it’s about a family in Trinidad and Tobago.

Goodreads: You also serve as Honorary Chair of The American Library Association’s Book Club Central and have made four selections so far: No One Is Coming to Save Us, Stay with Me, Exit West, and Anatomy of a Miracle. What goes into a great book club pick?

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SJP: That’s so personal because what you see in a book club is how many people disagree. There’s nothing better than that conversation. Anytime something is unfamiliar to the group, to me, is worthy of everyone’s time.

Take, for instance, Stay with Me. That book is about political climate, a story of culture, a story of men’s and women’s roles. How women look at each other, how they value each other. I think that’s a great conversation, because we all have opinions about how others should behave or how we see ourselves in those stories.

And I don’t mind at all being alone either in my affection or my disappointment in a book. So, we’ve been trying to pick books that provoke conversation, that also cultivate more curiosity about others. There are a million stories, but they’re really important for us to learn and to hear and to know and to try to be inside someone else’s experience. We try to pick books that allow that, whether it’s taking place in the deep South in this country or in Lagos or in an unidentified country. I just think all of those books have been wonderful for conversations.

Goodreads: Why did you decide to get involved in supporting public libraries?

SJP: I love libraries. We use them all the time in this house. We all have library cards. I check books out probably two or three times a month. I grew up with the library. We couldn’t afford to buy books growing up. That was not even an option. I didn’t even know that was an option to buy a book. I grew up going to a library at least once a week, never mind in school.

Libraries serve a very necessary function in communities. I think we have to remember libraries are shelter for people in this country, libraries are a warm place in the winter and a cool, refreshing place in the summer. They are access to computers people don’t have at home. They are a safe place. They are the gateway to knowledge.

Not everybody has a person in their life that shows them a book or says, “I feel like this is a story you might really connect with.” You know, a book can change a life. It can make you feel connected, it can make you feel not alone, it can transport you from something you don’t want to be thinking about. And a lot of people in this country don’t get to just go to bookstores and buy books.

I also think librarians are very special people and they love their work. They are stewards, and they are playing very important roles in lots of people’s lives of all ages and backgrounds. And those doors are open to everyone! It doesn’t matter who you are or where you’re from. You don’t have to be a documented person. You can walk into that library, and you have a place to study, to learn, to feel safe, to feel warm, to find quiet. And I just think we have to support our libraries because they are necessary in a community.

You know, the only way I’ll do a selfie is if people give me money for United for Libraries.

Goodreads: Is that right?

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SJP: That is exactly right. It started almost a year ago. After we left the American Library Association’s convention in Chicago. We were at the airport…and a bunch of people were coming up and asking for selfies. And I’m terrible at selfies. I’ve never taken one in my entire life. I can’t take them. I feel like an idiot. And I’m not good at it.

I said, You know what, I’ll give you a picture if you give me money for United for Libraries. So, people started doing it! Sometimes I’m able to send $800 a month, sometimes it’s less, it depends how much I’m out on the streets. But I do not take a picture unless you give me a donation for libraries. I don’t care if it’s a quarter. And it’s the best thing in the world, because people are like, “What’s UFL?” You’re telling people about our libraries, and they are seriously underfunded. So, I love doing that.

Goodreads: What are you currently reading, and what are you recommending to your friends?

SJP: Well, a lot of those books are on my Goodreads profile page! Let’s see…On Tyranny, which everyone should read. I’m really excited about Ottessa Moshfegh’s My Year of Rest and Relaxation. I haven’t read Pachinko yet, which I’m embarrassed to tell you. I’ve been moving through the Philip Roth canon, which has been mind-bending for me. I just read Swing Time, and I loved it. I also just read Play It as It Lays, which I thought was incredible. It's one of those early Joan Didion books. Absolutely fantastic. Recently, I read for real, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour by J.D. Salinger. I think that was required reading in ninth or tenth grade. It’s one of the most dense books. The first half is more of a narrative, and then the second half is really challenging. You have to really stick with it.

There’s a wonderful book by Lebonese-born journalist Rania Abouzeid, who has been covering Syria for years. She wrote No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria about her experience covering Syria, and it’s really devastating…I just think it’s a really great book. It’s not a pleasant story, but any time we have an opportunity to better understand that conflict and the devastation, I think we’re better for it.

I also want to remind people that A Constellation of Vital Phenomena is incredible.

Goodreads: What would be your definition of success for your literary imprint?

SJP: First of all, for it to be understood, for people to know my intentions. And honestly, to continue to have the same kind of opportunities I’m having with authors. I feel so privileged to be part of this process for the three authors I currently have. I think they’re all really gifted, very special, and important voices. And I mean to do right by them and to be deserving of the role I get to play in their professional lives. To have more of the same would just be a thrill.

I’m not an overly ambitious person in terms of “I want to have a book empire!” I just want to offer to readers, and press into readers’ hands, books that I think are not just important but exciting. Books that make you feel different when you finish them and books you wish you could start all over again for the first time. Books that stay with you.

Follow SJP



Comments Showing 1-50 of 100 (100 new)


message 1: by Olga (new)

Olga This is excellent. Thank you @SarahJessica for reminding so many about the power of the libraries and quality literature. Will definitely keep this on my radar. Thank you.


message 2: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey For those who want more context on this matter: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 3: by Katandra (new)

Katandra Nunnally Congrats & the best of luck in this new endeavor! I believe an avid reader turned publisher is exactly what the literary world needs!


message 4: by Amber (last edited Jun 11, 2018 10:01AM) (new)

Amber Sorry SJP, not interested. >_< I read for pleasure but don't follow celebrities unless they are my favorite actors or whatever but I choose who I want to check out reading wise. Don't need a celebrity to recommend books to me and not by an ad I didn't want either. blocked her when the stupid ad notification got into my notifications. no thank you!


message 5: by Steffi (new)

Steffi It's very dubious, to establish a new feature on GR, which enables so called "notable persons" to find followers on GR and don't give users any chance to deactivate this feature. And now, we clearly see, it's nothing more than advertisement.
What payed Sarah Jessica Parker and/or her imprint?


message 6: by Michael (new)

Michael Steffi wrote: "It's very dubious.."

Agreed! I want to connect to readers via books, and I am positively not interested in notable persons who might easily turn out to be not=able persons. Who will recommend the next book to me, Donald Trump?


message 7: by Trish (new)

Trish R. Michael wrote: "Steffi wrote: "It's very dubious.."

Agreed! I want to connect to readers via books, and I am positively not interested in notable persons who might easily turn out to be not=able persons. Who will..."


Amber wrote: "Sorry SJP, not interested. >_< I read for pleasure but don't follow celebrities unless they are my favorite actors or whatever but I choose who I want to check out reading wise. Don't need a celebr..."

Amber wrote: "Sorry SJP, not interested. >_< I read for pleasure but don't follow celebrities unless they are my favorite actors or whatever but I choose who I want to check out reading wise. Don't need a celebr..."

Ditto!


message 8: by Mike (new)

Mike "I just want to offer to readers, and press into readers’ hands, books that I think are not just important but exciting. Books that make you feel different when you finish them and books you wish you could start all over again for the first time. Books that stay with you."

I think that's a wonderful outlook - best of luck in your new venture SJP.


message 9: by Alexandra (last edited Jun 11, 2018 11:38AM) (new)

Alexandra I would like to know why the spam sent to some members “inviting” them to follow SJP deceptively claimed she had books she picked, rather than disclose this is a book she published and is marketing?

Why did GR make this spam claim reader activity rather than be honest this is advertising?


message 10: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra This is not the first time they’ve disguised advertising as user activity but it needs to stop.


message 11: by Mel (new)

Mel How do I get one of those book bags?


message 12: by Mimi (last edited Jun 11, 2018 01:32PM) (new)

Mimi Mel wrote: "How do I get one of those book bags?"

You can get the bag for free when you pre-order her first book in her imprint, then fill out this form. Hope this helps! https://app.snapapp.com/aplaceforuspr...


message 13: by Pete (new)

Pete Sent a complaint when I saw this earlier - now this blog and the comments below have given it further context. Not interested in this stuff at all. Count me out.

Just as a side note: I would honestly say to the [no doubt] lovely folks at Goodreads - the Facebook style format is not something to aspire to. You've got a great thing going here and I for one am happy that Goodreads exists, but by straining to expand by adding features in order to rival other social media platforms is definitely not the way to go. This platform is unique. Perhaps I don't understand the pressures you're under (and I get that this is Amazon we're talking about here) but please both for your sake and ours, try not to stray too far from the original blueprints. We're here because we like books, not celebrities/publishers/advertisements/manipulation/bullsh*t.


message 14: by Trish (new)

Trish R. Pete wrote: "Sent a complaint when I saw this earlier - now this blog and the comments below have given it further context. Not interested in this stuff at all. Count me out.

Just as a side note: I would hones..."


Well said, Pete.


message 15: by Dave (new)

Dave Oh, so this is why I got some spam request recently. No thank you. Horrible feature.


message 16: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra Pete wrote: "Sent a complaint when I saw this earlier - now this blog and the comments below have given it further context. Not interested in this stuff at all. Count me out.

Just as a side note: I would hones..."


I agree completely


message 17: by Susan (new)

Susan Pete wrote: "We're here because we like books, not celebrities/publishers/advertisements/manipulation/bullsh*t"

Well said, Pete! I'm sure I can manage my TBR list without celebrity endorsements, and I sure as hell don't want an "I read with SJP" bookmark.

Frankly, the whole enterprise strikes me as patronising.


message 18: by Susan (new)

Susan Just adding that I'm a bit sad that young women (who I assume are the target audience for this venture) feel they need book recommendations from an actress.


message 19: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey Susan wrote: "Just adding that I'm a bit sad that young women (who I assume are the target audience for this venture) feel they need book recommendations from an actress."

I'm a bit sad that people who make these assumptions about young women like me exist.


message 20: by Susan (last edited Jun 11, 2018 04:14PM) (new)

Susan Aubrey wrote: "I'm a bit sad that people who make these assumptions about young women like me exist."

Not that you fit the target audience, but yeah... (And not all women can be swayed by a pair of fancy heels.)


message 21: by Critterbee❇ (new)

Critterbee❇ Pete wrote: "...Not interested in this stuff at all. Count me out.

Just as a side note: I would honestly say to the [no doubt] lovely folks at Goodreads - the Facebook style format is not something to aspire to. You've got a great thing going here and I for one am happy that Goodreads exists, but by straining to expand by adding features in order to rival other social media platforms is definitely not the way to go. This platform is unique. Perhaps I don't understand the pressures you're under (and I get that this is Amazon we're talking about here) but please both for your sake and ours, try not to stray too far from the original blueprints. We're here because we like books, not celebrities/publishers/advertisements/manipulation/bullsh*t..."


I agree with Pete.

Or offer members an 'opt in to being marketed to by advertisers in a way that does not appear to be advertising' feature.


message 22: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra ❇Critterbee wrote: "I agree with Pete.

Or offer members an 'opt in to being marketed to by advertisers in a way that does not appear to be advertising' feature.
"


There already is an option for that. They simply add some "new" sort of spam and opt everyone in regardless of their settings when they feel like it. They've done it before.


message 23: by Dottie (new)

Dottie SO if Sarah Jessica Parker in on Goodreads and we follow here -- do we see her profile page or publisher or member page or is this just we see ads every new book she is involved in publishing-- I would personally enjoy knowing what is on her bookshelves which is the purpose of Goodreads after all. AMAZON owner or not Goodreads people take note.


message 24: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Pete wrote: "Sent a complaint when I saw this earlier - now this blog and the comments below have given it further context. Not interested in this stuff at all. Count me out.

Just as a side note: I would hones..."


Alexandra wrote: "❇Critterbee wrote: "I agree with Pete.

Or offer members an 'opt in to being marketed to by advertisers in a way that does not appear to be advertising' feature.
"

There already is an option for t..."


Amber wrote: "Sorry SJP, not interested. >_< I read for pleasure but don't follow celebrities unless they are my favorite actors or whatever but I choose who I want to check out reading wise. Don't need a celebr..."

Katandra wrote: "Congrats & the best of luck in this new endeavor! I believe an avid reader turned publisher is exactly what the literary world needs!"


message 25: by Joanne (last edited Jun 11, 2018 05:06PM) (new)

Joanne I think when this type of article is printed, there should be a way for people like me to just remove it from our screens.
While I will read comments from various authors, I don't care to waste my time reading something about a movie "star". Come up with an Ignore button, Goodreads!


message 26: by Susan (new)

Susan Joanne wrote: "While I will read comments from various authors, I don't care to waste my time reading something about a movie "star". Come up with an Ignore button, Goodreads!"

Seconded!


message 27: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine Amber wrote: "...Don't need a celebrity to recommend books to me and not by an ad I didn't want either. blocked her when the stupid ad notification got into my notifications. no thank you! "

I got that stupid notification too; was really annoyed! I went and checked my notification settings, but there was no setting for "being spammed about new books". SoI guess there is no way to turn it off?

If Goodreads wants to promote a book, have an ad, or have a blog post about it, but do not send people notifications and not allow them to turn them off! Not that I was interested in the book in the first place, but that makes me automatically not interested in the book.


message 28: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine Wonderer wrote: "...we're testing a new way of letting members know when a notable person, in this case Sarah Jessica Parker, joins Goodreads. We think these sorts of readers can help bring our members together and start new and interesting conversations. We want to make it easier for fans to find and follow their reviews. There isn't currently any way to opt out of these notifications, but I will pass your comments above on to our team. "

Wow. This really pisses me off. First, SJP isn't particularly notable. And clearly the majority of people who were spammed are clearly not fans or SJP, or interested. And not being able to opt out of this crap? Maddening. Is Goodreads trying to chase away its users?!

I have no problem with advertising, but to personally clog up someone's feed with notifications? At least they were just notifications and not emails...


message 29: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra Jasmine wrote: "If Goodreads wants to promote a book, have an ad, or have a blog post about it,"

An ad, yes. A blog post - IF they actually acknowledge in that blog post that it IS an ad, and not try to pass it off as if it's not.

That annoys me greatly, when they are so deceptive about their advertising.


message 30: by eaglevi (new)

eaglevi siongolf I think when this type of article is printed, there should be a way for people like me to just remove it from our screens.
While I will read comments from various authors, I don't care to waste my time reading something about a movie "star". Come up with an Ignore button, Goodreads!


message 31: by Maikki (new)

Maikki ❤️❤️❤️


message 32: by Jacquie ♡ (new)

Jacquie ♡ It's so funny how we tend to judge people. I did not take SJP as a reader or rather book lover simply because she's an actress. It's great that she's taking this new venture. It's great how you can use your love for books and turn it into a career, which is amazing!
I know she'll be great at what she does :)


message 33: by Michael (new)

Michael eaglevi wrote: "(…) there should be a way for people like me to just remove it from our screens."

This is all about money, so GR certainly doesn´t want you to ignore this nonsense.
By the way: I achieved good results using tippex ;)


message 34: by Qing (new)

Qing Wang Kind of sad to read the negative comments about such a positive move. Parker is promoting books she finds interesting and wants to share, which is (almost) every reader would like to do. Is it right to discourage book lovers because they are celebrities?

Wish Parker great success in her new adventure.


message 35: by Lars (new)

Lars Goodreads, I don't want anything to do with SJP! Stop suggesting this to me! And stop passing off advertisement as valuable content.


message 36: by Whitley (last edited Jun 12, 2018 04:48AM) (new)

Whitley Wow! lot of people are really salty about SJP getting involved with GoodReads. I don't care for celebrity culture, but SJP has my admiration. She is very public about her love for libraries, a love that she shares with her children, and she has had a public book club of her own for some time now (I follow it on Instagram but there may be other ways to stay updated). She doesn't need the money (not sure if you guys know this but she's kind of famous and has a new fragrance and shoe line). Honestly, I think it's pretty impressive that she has the ability to be a tastemaker in so many arenas.

At the end of the day you can look around and find negativity in every new development or new person you come across, or you can look for the light and strive to support your fellow humans. I personally can't wait for her future recommendations, and plan on taking my daughter to my local library today to hunt for some of her current suggestions (as well as a few of my own).


message 37: by James (new)

James so this seems like a book imprint (what marketing asshat came up with that?!?) for white people? "books that are about "global voices about unknown places, cultures, faiths" says to me "things white people are unaware of, mostly"... kinda tired, OK, REALLY tired of "famous people" thinking what they think matters... not that it doesn't in the grand scope of the world (we all have something to say, right?), but when-o-when will "nonfamous people" stop idolizing/fetishizing any/everything "famous people" comment about? what makes this "actress" good at picking books? and if she's just having someone doing it and getting likes and positive tweets and more social media followers because she's managed to glom on to the fact that "nonfamous people read books and what i great way to grow the SJP Brand!" i can't even think how ridiculous it is... the ONLY reason that anyone "knows" anything about her is because of her PR team... she doesn't have nonfamous friends, so anyone thinking there's any "mi casa su casa" going on with you and her are kidding themselves... she's using you to make money for herself and someone else... she could have done what she's doing without telling everyone, right? wouldn't that route validate, somehow, her quality book choices? ugh. starstruck people freak me out...


message 38: by James (new)

James Whitley wrote: "Wow! lot of people are really salty about SJP getting involved with GoodReads. I don't care for celebrity culture, but SJP has my admiration. She is very public about her love for libraries, a love..."

sure she "needs the money" or she wouldn't take it... or she could donate ALL of it to libraries, since she "doesn't need it"... so tired of rich people doing the rest of us favors... idea: how about working to change the system that keeps most people poor/struggling while you (SJP) make loads of money by standing around, modeling shoes and attaching your face to perfume and the like???... she makes tons of money because people are starstruck and fame-chasers...


message 39: by Michelle (new)

Michelle I don't much like the way this was done either -- although I'm now following her because I'm curious. However, I like that influential women are promoting books, and Reese Witherspoon -- not to mention Oprah -- have made me aware of new favorites, like The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row for Oprah or Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine from Reese Witherspoon.

There's also Emma Watson and Emma Roberts, although I'm not as familiar with their selections. I just think it's good for women in particular to model reading for young girls when society tries to makes vapid and beautiful or popular interchangeable.


message 40: by Emily, Community Manager (new)

Emily Dottie wrote: "SO if Sarah Jessica Parker in on Goodreads and we follow here -- do we see her profile page or publisher or member page or is this just we see ads every new book she is involved in publishing-- I w..."

If you follow Sarah Jessica Parker, you'll see the books on her shelves just like if you followed any other Goodreads member. Sometimes this will be a book from her imprint, but she also reads and posts updates about other books.


message 41: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine Emily, how we can stop Goodreads from spamming our notifications? THAT is what I have a problem with. I do not want to see any notifications, unless I have signed up for them (ex. responses to certain blogs, etc). If I want to follow someone, I will. I don't want to be spammed about it.


message 42: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine Michelle, added "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row" to my to-read list!


message 43: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Jasmine wrote: "Michelle, added "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row" to my to-read list!"

Yaaay!


message 44: by Holly (new)

Holly I can honestly say I've never read a book because a "notable" person enjoyed it or recommended it. I read books on subjects and themes that interest me, personally. I have no problem finding books I want to read.

Well meaning celebrities, or those simply seeking my cash will be wasting their time trying to appeal to me. Certain types of marketing have a way of backfiring; creating hostile opinions from consumers rather than favorable reactions.


message 45: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine If a book interests me, I will read it--doesn't matter where I get the recommendation--Goodreads, a friend, a celebrity, etc. But it must interest me; I'm not going to read a book simply because a celebrity recommends it. (I have enjoyed some books recommended by Oprah.)

Holly wrote: " Certain types of marketing have a way of backfiring; creating hostile opinions from consumers rather than favorable reactions. "

Bingo. Spamming people's notifications has certainly had this effect! Too bad, because perhaps some books recommended by SJP may be of interest to me. Oh well, I have plenty of other books to read.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* Whitley wrote: "Wow! lot of people are really salty about SJP getting involved with GoodReads. I don't care for celebrity culture, but SJP has my admiration. She is very public about her love for libraries, a love..."

You make excellent points. I agree with you on thinking it's a good thing SJP is getting into books and Goodreads - I was happy another celebrity also recently did the same. Hey, it can only promote reading even more right?

I think the main issue people have is the changes with Goodreads. I don't mind a blog post at all, it does fit into book announcements that are notable with a new publishing contract and online book club, but I do agree with the people who say they don't want notifications in their feed about it.


message 47: by Classic (new)

Classic Towing Congratulation dear and thanks for sharing this book.


message 48: by Sgoiscool (new)

Sgoiscool Looking for members for: Book authors


message 49: by Dee (new)

Dee Dee Gee, please encourage SJP to find yet another avenue for her vain expressions. Personally, I had a drama/nonsense overdose from "Sex........" after three episodes. When is "done" enough?


message 50: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Canfield I see a lot of negative comments here about people who are adverse to the added feature or component of celebrity contributions. I was surprised yet appreciative of having another life story of discovery. My feeling is that we are all on this journey of life. And, if someone, whether a celebrity or not, has a valid perspective and is contributing to the cause of supporting writers and providing a platform for readers to avail themselves of new and quality material, I say " Why the hell not?" Besides, SJP is very humble about her qualifications. Yet she seems determined to acknowledge the hard work of others.


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