Grammarly's 9 Must-Read Books to Celebrate National Grammar Day

Posted by Marie on March 2, 2018
In honor of National Grammar Day this Sunday, we asked the staff at Grammarly—an online personal writing assistant—to recommend books that can help with writing, style, and even conversation. As champions of effective communication, we felt their passion made them great experts to turn to.

"Our suggested reading for National Grammar Day reflects important aspects of communication. There are style and grammar guides to help you make sense of the English language, and books to help you effectively translate your ideas. And we also included our favorite books about writing in general, because the most valuable thing you can do for your writing is just doing it. So however you communicate, these books will help get you started—we’ll be there to help."

Don't forget to add your favorites to your Want to Read shelf!



Grammarly’s grammar and style picks:

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Grammarly’s writing picks:

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Grammarly’s communication picks:

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What are your favorite books on grammar, style, or writing? Let us know in the comments!

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Comments Showing 1-27 of 27 (27 new)

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message 1: by Peggy (new)

Peggy Eats, Shoots, and Leaves. Elements of Style.


message 3: by Alison (new)

Alison Smith Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen by Mary Norris


message 4: by Judy (new)

Judy Nabokov's Favorite Word Is Mauve What the Numbers Reveal About the Classics, Bestsellers, and Our Own Writing by Ben Blatt
What writers say they do vs. what they really do.


message 5: by D.G. (new)

D.G. Peggy wrote: "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves. Elements of Style."

How could they have forgotten this one!!


message 6: by Donna (last edited Mar 04, 2018 09:50AM) (new)


message 8: by Mackay (new)

Mackay "Conan the Grammarian," by Susan Mackay Smith
"Steering the Craft," by LeGuin
"Handbook of Good English," Edward D. Johnson


message 9: by Mya (new)

Mya As someone who loves to read but cannot write grammatically, thank you all for the suggestions. They will definitely help.


message 10: by TheBohemianBookworm (last edited Mar 04, 2018 11:15AM) (new)

TheBohemianBookworm I am surprised The Elements of Style is not on here? I thought that was pretty classic?


message 11: by Charles (new)

Charles Heath Revising Prose by Richard A. Lanham


message 13: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Chris wrote: "How timely!

I've been reading The Great Courses: English Grammar Boot Camp, and am about a third of the way through it. Hit a snag that only a grammando would obsess about: I stron..."


I'm about 75% through this now. I have less of a problem with "they" as a singular pronoun than I do with what I feel are more artificial and awkward contortions, such as "ze" or "mx." That aside, it's worth while to keep going through the lectures only to experience the WTF moment when she talks about because+noun and "slash" spelled out in a sentence as a coordinator. I don't agree with her at all on those things, but it's led to some lively discussion around my dinner table.


message 14: by Celia (new)

Celia Isn't the comma in the sentence below incorrect since the second clause is not independent...? Lol #NailedIt

"There are style and grammar guides to help you make sense of the English language, and books to help you effectively translate your ideas."


message 16: by Nate (new)

Nate Celia wrote: "Isn't the comma in the sentence below incorrect since the second clause is not independent...? Lol #NailedIt

"There are style and grammar guides to help you make sense of the English language, and..."


Ha! Nice catch!
However, if we want to be even more snobbish, the purpose of grammar is to allow clear communication; without the comma it would look like the style and grammar guides in question would help you make sense of the English language and books, which would make for a confusing sentence. I still think they should have worded it differently, though :)


message 17: by Ray (new)

Ray Hellwig Elements of Style by Strunk & White


message 18: by Wendy (last edited Mar 04, 2018 08:47PM) (new)

Wendy I agree with Elements of Style. Also...
The Transitive Vampire: a Handbook of Grammar for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed
Witty and informative!
(Edited to add that I realized that someone already suggested The Transitive Vampire. I therefore second that motion. 8>) )


message 19: by Niklas (last edited Mar 04, 2018 11:07PM) (new)

Niklas Pivic GypsyBookworm wrote: "I am surprised The Elements of Style is not on here? I thought that was pretty classic?"

Word! Strunk and White forever.


message 21: by Larry (new)

Larry Loftis The echo is deafening. The Elements of Style.


message 24: by Randall (new)

Randall Moore As a person who failed English in high school and is an amateur author, I have a renewed interest in proper English. I recently finished a first read-through of 'Elements of Style' and am interested in reading more on the subject, so I appreciate the recommendations of one and all.
However I take very seriously the admonition from Elmore Leonard; to write the way people talk, not what is correct.
I have to ignore many of Microsoft Word's squiggly lines, which if followed would make my writing laughably wooden and ridiculous; particularly the gender recommendations.


message 25: by Robert (new)

Robert Hughes The Elements of Expression by Arthur Plotnik should be on this list. It’s en essential guide for writers.


message 26: by Christine (new)

Christine Ottaway Writing Great Dialogue by Mark and Cherish Stibbe.


message 27: by Brately (new)

Brately Anyone who produces online content can't be absolutely satisfied with Grammarly. The INK FOR ALL AI accounts for search.


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