I received this wonderful account from Erin, age 12.



    I had stayed up late the night before at our ward’s Women’s Retreat, and was grumpy that evening. My sister and I were supposed to clean our room. I was mean to her, and my mom took away my book, Palace of Stone, for five days. When I argued and tried to get my book back, I got sent to bed.
As I was lying there, I was trying to think of ways to get my book back. I didn’t want to just take it, even though I knew I could easily find it and take it back. The only other way I could think of was to convince my mom to give it back, and I didn’t know how I would do that. So I started thinking about what I had already read. I had just passed the part when Miri convinces Peder’s dad to let him go to the lowland by using Diplomacy. Suddenly the idea came to me. I could use diplomacy to get my book back. If it worked for Miri, is should work for me, right?

    Rule one: Identify the problem
    “I know I’m not allowed to have my book back.”

    Rule two: Admit your own error
    “I was mean to Ashley and disobeyed you. That was wrong.”

    Rule three: State the error of the other party
    “But you took my book and yelled at me. That was wrong too.”
   
    Rules four + five:  Propose specific compromises + Invite mutual acceptance
    “I think we should put that behind us and forget last night on these terms. I will try my hardest to be nice to my siblings and do everything I’m asked the first time. In return you will give me my book back.”

    Rules five + six: Illustrate the negative outcome of refusal and positive acceptance + Assert a deadline for acceptance
    I couldn’t really think of any way to say this without it sounding like a threat. You know, she is my mom. :)

    I also had to make sure she was in a good mood. I chose Sunday afternoon, on the way home from our ward choir practice. Then we were alone in the car for several minutes. All through choir I prepared myself and went over my speech in my head. In the car, I gave it to her, and she laughed. I didn’t get my book back until later that afternoon, but it still worked. I was really excited that now I could finish devouring it and enjoy the drive to Salt Lake to visit family.


 


What a cutie! Cheers to Erin and her mom. Also, here's more info about the webcast event: Join Shannon for a live webcast at Brooklyn Friends School to celebrate the release of Palace of Stone. Click here to register for the free event.

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Published on September 19, 2012 06:28 • 575 views
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message 1: by R.G. (new)

R.G. in some ways that sounds bad for a parent to punish by taking away books... but in other ways it sounds really good that kids out there love books so much that that has to be their punishment... cute story though...


message 2: by Jenalyn (new)

Jenalyn Raygun wrote: "in some ways that sounds bad for a parent to punish by taking away books... but in other ways it sounds really good that kids out there love books so much that that has to be their punishment... cu..."

That was always my punishment growing up. My friends always thought it was weird, because their parents would punish them by giving them a book. I think that says a lot about how much I read growing up. :)


message 3: by R.G. (new)

R.G. yeah i'm glad my parents never thought of that... of course i was lucky with a house full of books it's hard to keep them all away... :D


message 4: by Julie (new)

Julie Haha, smart girl! That was my punishment too. But my parents always felt silly taking books away from me, so I got them back pretty soon :)


message 5: by Mercedes (last edited Sep 20, 2012 08:48PM) (new)

Mercedes Bell I read all my books on my laptop so if my mom ever wanted to really punish me she'd have to take away my whole laptop which i do school on also. So jokes on her :D


message 6: by Emily (new)

Emily Rachelle There was one year when Mom decided I needed to expand my horizens and made me read a book of her choosing in between each book I chose. I'll admit there was a good bit of sneaking around, reading while still in the library, and leaving books at my BFF's house so I could walk over and read them there when Mom thought we were just hanging out. :P I was the only child of four to go through that, so I think she realized the futility of forcing someone to read new genres... She has new, more subtle tactics now! Haha.

(Why must oldest children be the guinea pigs?)


message 7: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Jenalyn wrote: "Raygun wrote: "in some ways that sounds bad for a parent to punish by taking away books... but in other ways it sounds really good that kids out there love books so much that that has to be their p..."

Same for me. It still is! Taking away my books is like taking away my heart.


message 8: by R.G. (new)

R.G. BirdsAndPoetry wrote: "Jenalyn wrote: "Raygun wrote: "in some ways that sounds bad for a parent to punish by taking away books... but in other ways it sounds really good that kids out there love books so much that that h..."

i know right... i don't think i could live without books... they are essential to my life...


message 9: by Tanis (new)

Tanis Everytime my grades get below a B my parents take all my boosk away except for the Bible. They say they feel bad haveing to ground me from reading but I don't care about anything else. anyways.... I know how you guys feel.


message 10: by Maren (last edited Nov 04, 2012 09:02AM) (new)

Maren whenever i got in trouble my parents would send me to my room...i had so many books stuffed in every nook and cranny they didn't bother trying to take them all away. i spent hours in there reading when i was supposed to be "punished." ;)if only life were so simple, right?


message 11: by Maren (new)

Maren and i should try the Diplomacy thing...good tactic!


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