sneak peek UK-World e-covers redo for Chalion trio

While my print publisher holds the rights for e-editions of my earlier fantasy novels here in the US/North America, we'd retained foreign rights, way back when. So when the e-books market opened up with Kindle etc. a decade ago, the first three Chalion books and the Sharing Knife series were among the first works of mine we were able to put up as indie ebooks in that market. Those early experimental covers have been up for a long time, so I figured, with the Penric experiences under our belts, that it was time to refresh them.

I've been working with artist Ron Miller (well, he was doing most of the work) for the past several weeks, and here's a peek at the results. They're planned to go up on my UK and World e-editions of Kindle and Apple Books in the next week or so. I don't know if already-purchased e-copies will refresh themselves the way they thankfully do for corrected typos -- it'll be interesting to find out.




(The actual covers will have better resolution than this thumbnail at the larger magnifications, though likely most prospective purchasers will only be glancing at small cover images on the vendors' screens.)


Ta, L.
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Published on September 06, 2021 08:45
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message 1: by Pers (new)

Pers Those covers are awesome!


message 2: by Carro (new)

Carro Oh those are good. Really reflect the books and a splendid selection of fortresses. Love having the particularly troublesome horse on the cover of Paladin.


message 3: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Palfrey The novels are about people, and I see no people on the covers. Admittedly, an artist's impression of a fictional character never seems quite right. But perhaps some characters could have been added in the middle distance, giving an impression rather than a detailed portrait.

However, covers are less important to me now that I read e-books. I used to see the cover every time I picked up the book; now I see it only if I go and look for it, or as a thumbnail among other covers. I'll probably see the cover more often on the Web than on the book itself, in fact.


message 4: by Ron (new)

Ron Miller Pers wrote: "Those covers are awesome!"

Thanks!


message 5: by Ron (new)

Ron Miller Jonathan wrote: "The novels are about people, and I see no people on the covers. Admittedly, an artist's impression of a fictional character never seems quite right. But perhaps some characters could have been adde..."

Well, for better or worse, there were a couple of reasons and you kind of hit on one of them when you said "an artist's impression of a fictional character never seems quite right." The other reason was the goal of linking all three covers by means of an animal/demon associated with each story.


message 6: by Ron (new)

Ron Miller Carro wrote: "Oh those are good. Really reflect the books and a splendid selection of fortresses. Love having the particularly troublesome horse on the cover of Paladin."

Thanks! And I am glad that you like the horse since I really hate painting horses!

I am also happy that you like the fortresses/castles, too. I tried to follow Lois' descriptions as closely as I could (including the friezes on the towers in "Paladin").


message 7: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Palfrey The covers are well drawn, from what I can see at this size: good quality artwork. The demon-animal I associate with "Paladin of Souls" is the bear. I'd actually forgotten that the horse was also possessed, I had to go back and check; I remembered it only as bad-tempered.


message 8: by Kathy (new)

Kathy The new covers are beautiful! The castles advertise the settings of the books well. I hope they attract new readers. I am glad I have the hardcover edition of Paladin of Souls, though, because that picture with the woman who doesn't look like a typical warrior or princess and the cape with faces is haunting and evocative.


message 9: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Kathy wrote: "... that picture [on the hardcover] with the woman who doesn't look like a typical warrior or princess and the cape with faces is haunting and evocative."
I agree, but I also realize that the picture is too detailed to work well for the e-books. Having an iconic animal on each cover is brilliant, and of course we'd want the wolf for Hallowed Hunt and the crow for Chalion. To Jonathan's point re. the bear, we spend more time in Paladin with the demon-infested horse than with Foix's bear, and it is Ista who is associated with the horse, so as it's Ista's book, the horse seems the most iconic choice.


message 10: by Michelle (new)

Michelle I really like those covers.


message 11: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Palfrey Katherine wrote: "Kathy wrote: "… we spend more time in Paladin with the demon-infested horse than with Foix's bear, and it is Ista who is associated with the horse, so as it's Ista's book, the horse seems the most iconic choice."

It's a matter of opinion, and my opinion isn't important. However, I see the bear demon as more significant because it goes to Foix and remains with him for the rest of the story. Whereas the horse demon remains with the horse and is never of real importance to Ista or the story (unless I'm missing something?).


message 12: by Karenhunt (new)

Karenhunt Wow! Such an improvement over the older UK covers!


message 13: by Lois (last edited Sep 07, 2021 03:48PM) (new)

Lois Bujold Jonathan wrote: "Katherine wrote: "Kathy wrote: "… we spend more time in Paladin with the demon-infested horse than with Foix's bear, and it is Ista who is associated with the horse, so as it's Ista's book, the hor..."

It carried Arhys on his last ride, which was a pretty big, if late, contribution, and Ista took it for her own preferred personal mount later. To many people's dismay...

More central than Foix's bear, yes. Not as central as the wolf or the crows, maybe, but the best choice to maintain the series look, distinct but related. And, possibly unlike Ron, I love horses.

I'm glad we/I decided to do all three covers at once, speaking of series issues. I'd started out just thinking to do HH first, but the interlocking effects turned out to be pretty fruitful. Covers are haaarrrd...

Ta, L.


message 14: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Palfrey The author likes the horse 🙂. Well, the wolf is the obvious choice for "The Hallowed Hunt"; for the other two books, there isn't really a central animal, so you can pick whatever appeals to you. For "The Curse of Chalion", you could have thrown in a leopard as well as the crow, which would be colourful and intriguing. Rat and crow might be appropriate, but less appealing.


message 15: by Ron (new)

Ron Miller Just for the record, I like horses...I just hate drawing them! ;-)


message 16: by Lois (new)

Lois Bujold Jonathan wrote: "The author likes the horse 🙂. Well, the wolf is the obvious choice for "The Hallowed Hunt"; for the other two books, there isn't really a central animal, so you can pick whatever appeals to you. Fo..."

Particularly for e-covers, which will appear on people's screens at various sizes including quite small, it's a good idea to avoid clutter and too much critical fine detail. One salient critter, I think, has more impact than an unfocused zoo (or royal menagerie) of 'em.

Ron has a rant article or two on the function of covers as advertising (for prospective book buyers) as, let's not say opposed to, let's say contrasted with, illustration, which he might be persuaded to link...

Ta, L.

(Horses, btw, were the first things I taught myself to draw, about as soon as I could hold a pencil. I had, at some early point, a much treasured Visible Horse (and an extensive other plastic stable) from which I can still remember anatomical detail. No artist, me, but I nailed horses.)


message 17: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Palfrey Lois wrote: "One salient critter, I think, has more impact..."

Your book, your choice. These covers have some relevance to the stories within, which is more than can be said for a lot of covers out there.

My old paperback copy of Simak's "Time is the simplest thing" has a cover showing a Pan Am spaceliner in Earth orbit, although the novel says on its first page that mankind cannot survive in space due to lethal radiation of various kinds; so there are no spaceships of any kind in the story.


message 18: by ms bookjunkie (new)

ms bookjunkie Pretty!


message 19: by Gordon (new)

Gordon Jackson I'm glad to see the crow featured. I always feel a bit sorry for the crow.


message 20: by Softness (new)

Softness Oh man, I'd love these on physical books! OMG


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