Show Up




Writing can be tough and
sometimes we get distracted or feel inhibited by things like:







1. Past failures



2. Success of others



3. Our own inabilities



4. Time constraints



5. Lack of inspiration













These are all real issues that
writers face. If you’re like me, you’ve dealt with at least one or all of these at
some point. I’ve been reading a book called GRIT by Angela Duckworth. She didn’t write this book specifically for writers, but she very well could
have with how many of her points rang true for me.









Show Up




I don’t know about you, but I can think
about 10 reasons in 3 seconds of why I shouldn’t be writing or what else I
could do rather than write. There’s always an excuse, and trust me, they’re
good!




But in Chapter 1 of GRIT,
Angela discusses how we need to show up in order to be successful. I can be the
best writer on the planet, but if I’m not sitting at my computer, typing up the
words, I can’t find any success. I have to write, and if that means that it’s
not perfect, that’s okay.




“Potential is one
thing,” Angela reminds us. “What we do with it is quite another.”





Ultimately, those with high
GRIT, find greater success.









What’s GRIT, you ask? Do you
have it? Go here to test your GRIT
scale. Where did you come out as? 




That sounds all good, right? But
where can we start to overcome that inability to find time or energy or
motivation to write.




Here are some things that work for me:




1. Create a plan 




I
set for myself a reasonable and achievable deadline for each of my drafts. I
love using Pacemaker to
keep me on track. If I get behind, I brew the coffee and set my alarm. No
excuses.




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2. I check in with my accountability group




I’m a part of a group of fantastic writers on Slack, which
was organized by my critique partner, Debbie Ridpath Ohi. Every day I post my
writing goal and do everything I can to make that goal. Within the Slack
channel, we have individual places to post struggles, daily life, and share
virtual food. We even have a cat named Tess!












3. Belief in what I’m doing is valuable




Sometimes as writers we feel like we’re just writing into
the void—at least I do. This couldn’t be further from the truth! When I’m
discouraged, I go to my bookshelf where the books that inspired me are shelved
and I focus on those memories and impressions. 









 I also have received so many
beautiful and kind letters from kids all around the world, and when I pull them
out, I’m reminded that I’m writing stories for them, too, not just for me. I’m
sure those kids will never know the power that their words have on a daily
basis!











What works for you? I’d love
to know! Share your ideas and thoughts in the comments.
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Published on June 29, 2017 06:00
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