Matthew Selwyn

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Matthew Selwyn

Goodreads Author


Born
in The United Kingdom
Website

Twitter

Member Since
December 2011

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Matthew Selwyn is a young writer from London, England. His debut novel, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy was released in 2014. A student and librarian, he is often to be found hiding amongst the stacks in the Victorian library where he works, surrounded by piles of books.

He writes book reviews online at www.bibliofreak.net.

Average rating: 3.71 · 38 ratings · 18 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
****: The Anatomy of Melanc...

3.67 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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Young Writers' Anthology 2015

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4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings4 editions
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Review: The Girls of Slender Means by Muriel Spark


“Long ago in 1945 all the nice people in England were poor, allowing for exceptions.”
It is 1945 and the end of war is in sight. Britain’s young people are having to refocus their aims for a world no longer at war. For the girls at The May of Teck Club (an establishment "for the Pecuniary Convenience and Social Protection of Ladies of Slender Means below the age of Thirty Years" in Kensington, L... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on July 06, 2019 06:26

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Matthew Selwyn is now friends with Hannah Burdekin
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Matthew Selwyn rated a book it was ok
Dare to Remember by Susanna Beard
Dare to Remember
by Susanna Beard (Goodreads Author)
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This read like a good first draft of a novel to me - it focused on the single plot too heavily to the exclusion of the smaller details that make a story believable and, ultimately, left the characters flat on the page. The structure is good and with ...more
Matthew Selwyn rated a book liked it
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
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Despite some pretty intolerable sexism and a plot that meanders after the big card game, I did enjoy this. Very close to the film adaptation in plot and if anbything a little darker. I haven't read many Bond books (this is only my second) but I would ...more
Matthew Selwyn wants to read 50 books in the 2017 Reading Challenge
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He has read 2 books toward his goal of 50 books.
 
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Matthew Selwyn rated a book it was amazing
The Sellout by Paul Beatty
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Entirely worthy winner of the Booker prize: abrasive, hilarious look at Blackness in America.

My full review is here: http://www.bibliofreak.net/2016/12/re...
Matthew Selwyn rated a book it was amazing
The Fall by Albert Camus
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Matthew Selwyn rated a book really liked it
A History of Britain in 21 Women by Jenni Murray
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Is just what the title suggests, nothing more or less. My full review is here: http://www.bibliofreak.net/2016/12/re...
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The Sandman by E.T.A. Hoffmann
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The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley
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Read this at school and it holds up to a re-read very well.

My full review is here: http://www.bibliofreak.net/2016/10/re...
Matthew Selwyn rated a book liked it
Lolito by Ben Brooks
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http://www.bibliofreak.net/2016/10/re...
More of Matthew's books…
“Walking into a bookshop is a depressing thing. It’s not the pretentious twats, browsing books as part of their desirable lifestyle. It’s not the scrubby members of staff serving at the counter: the pseudo-hippies and fucking misfits. It’s not the stink of coffee wafting out from somewhere in the building, a concession to the cult of the coffee bean. No, it’s the books.

I could ignore the other shit, decide that maybe it didn’t matter too much, that when consumerism meets culture, the result is always going to attract wankers and everything that goes with them. But the books, no, they’re what make your stomach sink and that feeling of dark syrup on the brain descend.

Look around you, look at the shelves upon shelves of books – for years, the vessels of all knowledge. We’re part of the new world now, but books persist. Cheap biographies, pulp fiction; glossy covers hiding inadequate sentiments. Walk in and you’re surrounded by this shit – to every side a reminder that we don’t want stimulation anymore, we want sedation. Fight your way through the celebrity memoirs, pornographic cook books, and cheap thrills that satisfy most and you get to the second wave of vomit-inducing product: offerings for the inspired and arty. Matte poetry books, classics, the finest culture can provide packaged and wedged into trendy coverings, kidding you that you’re buying a fashion accessory, not a book.

But hey, if you can stomach a trip further into the shop, you hit on the meatier stuff – history, science, economics – provided they can stick ‘pop.’ in front of it, they’ll stock it. Pop. psychology, pop. art, pop. life. It’s the new world – we don’t want serious anymore, we want nuggets of almost-useful information. Books are the past, they’re on the out. Information is digital now; bookshops, they’re somewhere between gallery and museum.”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“A smile is just the contortion of a face”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“We can’t handle absence anymore, anything is better than the blankness; the quiet of nothingness. People fight to put images of love and hate – both equally nauseating – between themselves and the blank space that surrounds us. It’s the only escape, and yet we feel the pressure of the blankness pressing in against us, forcing the violent display ever closer, forcing us to demand images brighter, more graphic until they scorch our senses badly enough that we no longer feel the void and the images become our reality.

But it’s ok. Most people don’t need to fear absence anymore – we’re blinded, permanently. There’s no need to seek out the light show that protects us either; inoculation precedes the sickness now. Sedation isn’t an option, it’s a shared reality. Most people don’t see the beauty of the system, how perfect our salvation is.”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“A smile is just the contortion of a face”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“All your life you look to America for those home-grown, corn-fed tits that the Yank bitches all sprout when they’re about fourteen – those bulging DDs that you wank about as a kid as you look longingly across the Atlantic, simultaneously repulsed and electrified – and then the greatest tits you’ve ever seen walk straight out of Giffnock (Glasgow, but you knew that, right?) and bounce their sweet way down to you via the Caledonian-sleeper train. I know they say America is finished, but Christ, when the Jock lassies are packing the premium chest meat, you know they aren’t kidding.”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“We can’t handle absence anymore, anything is better than the blankness; the quiet of nothingness. People fight to put images of love and hate – both equally nauseating – between themselves and the blank space that surrounds us. It’s the only escape, and yet we feel the pressure of the blankness pressing in against us, forcing the violent display ever closer, forcing us to demand images brighter, more graphic until they scorch our senses badly enough that we no longer feel the void and the images become our reality.

But it’s ok. Most people don’t need to fear absence anymore – we’re blinded, permanently. There’s no need to seek out the light show that protects us either; inoculation precedes the sickness now. Sedation isn’t an option, it’s a shared reality. Most people don’t see the beauty of the system, how perfect our salvation is.”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“I lock eyes but see no flicker of humanity. Out of shot, bullets fly and bodies fall. In shot, there is only death. War is forced upon these people, and they take up arms naïvely. They fight for a cause, but die for another. Wars are fucked but they’ll never stop, the sums are pretty simple: wars are good for most people with power and bad for most people without. Arms dealers, politicians, big business; they profit from conflict. The average man’s only interest is a moral one. And so it’s the moral man who fights, who stands righteously on the frontline while bullets fill bank accounts, and images of heroism and death are captured and sent home to remind the rest of us – the amoral cheerleaders – that we’re still alive.”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

“Walking into a bookshop is a depressing thing. It’s not the pretentious twats, browsing books as part of their desirable lifestyle. It’s not the scrubby members of staff serving at the counter: the pseudo-hippies and fucking misfits. It’s not the stink of coffee wafting out from somewhere in the building, a concession to the cult of the coffee bean. No, it’s the books.

I could ignore the other shit, decide that maybe it didn’t matter too much, that when consumerism meets culture, the result is always going to attract wankers and everything that goes with them. But the books, no, they’re what make your stomach sink and that feeling of dark syrup on the brain descend.

Look around you, look at the shelves upon shelves of books – for years, the vessels of all knowledge. We’re part of the new world now, but books persist. Cheap biographies, pulp fiction; glossy covers hiding inadequate sentiments. Walk in and you’re surrounded by this shit – to every side a reminder that we don’t want stimulation anymore, we want sedation. Fight your way through the celebrity memoirs, pornographic cook books, and cheap thrills that satisfy most and you get to the second wave of vomit-inducing product: offerings for the inspired and arty. Matte poetry books, classics, the finest culture can provide packaged and wedged into trendy coverings, kidding you that you’re buying a fashion accessory, not a book.

But hey, if you can stomach a trip further into the shop, you hit on the meatier stuff – history, science, economics – provided they can stick ‘pop.’ in front of it, they’ll stock it. Pop. psychology, pop. art, pop. life. It’s the new world – we don’t want serious anymore, we want nuggets of almost-useful information. Books are the past, they’re on the out. Information is digital now; bookshops, they’re somewhere between gallery and museum.”
Matthew Selwyn, ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy

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Matthew Selwyn Marsha wrote: "Hi Matthew,
Haven't seen you much on Twitter lately. Guess I'm not up late enough at night to catch you.
Hope you have a wonderful holiday."


Haha, no I do keep funny times on Twitter :s Hope you've been well, and are all set up for a wonderful Christmas period :)


Marsha Cornelius Hi Matthew,
Haven't seen you much on Twitter lately. Guess I'm not up late enough at night to catch you.
Hope you have a wonderful holiday.


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