James Ladyman

James Ladyman



Average rating: 3.88 · 294 ratings · 27 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Understanding Philosophy of...

3.83 avg rating — 185 ratings — published 2001 — 16 editions
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Every Thing Must Go: Metaph...

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Road to Reality with Roger ...

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Scientific Metaphysics

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3.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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Arguing about Science

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3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2012 — 7 editions
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“Attaching epistemic significance to metaphysical intuitions is anti-naturalist for two reasons. First, it requires ignoring the fact that science, especially physics, has shown us that the universe is very strange to our inherited conception of what it is like. Second, it requires ignoring central implications of evolutionary theory, and of the cognitive and behavioural sciences, concerning the nature of our minds.”
James Ladyman, Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized

“Given that the `common sense' of many contemporary philosophers is shaped and supplemented by ideas from classical physics, the locus of most metaphysical discussions is an image of the world that sits unhappily between the manifest image and an out of date scientific image.11”
James Ladyman, Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized

“Lewis famously advocated a metaphysical methodology based on subjecting rival hypotheses to a cost-benefit analysis. Usually there are two kinds of cost associated with accepting a metaphysical thesis. The first is accepting some kind of entity into one's ontology, for example, abstracta, possibilia, or a relation of primitive resemblance. The second is relinquishing some intuitions, for example, the intuition that causes antedate their effects, that dispositions reduce to categorical bases, or that facts about identity over time supervene on facts about instants of time. It is taken for granted that abandoning intuitions should be regarded as a cost rather than a benefit.”
James Ladyman, Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized



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