Cecil Day-Lewis


Born
in Ballintubbert, County Laois, Ireland
April 27, 1904

Died
May 22, 1972

Genre


Cecil Day-Lewis (Also Day Lewis)
British Poet Laureate from 1968-1972.
He also wrote mystery stories under the pseudonym of Nicholas Blake
Father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis, journalist and food writer Tamasin Day-Lewis, and writer Sean Day-Lewis.



Average rating: 4.24 · 3,829 ratings · 171 reviews · 57 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Otterbury Incident

4.10 avg rating — 225 ratings — published 1948 — 8 editions
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The Complete Poems of C. Da...

3.95 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1954 — 6 editions
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The Poetic Image

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1947 — 9 editions
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Pegasus and Other Poems

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1957 — 4 editions
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The Buried Day: A Personal ...

3.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1960 — 2 editions
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The Lyric Impulse

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings2 editions
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Starting Point

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1937
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Selected Poetry

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1951 — 5 editions
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A hope for poetry: reprint ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1974 — 4 editions
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Word Over All

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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More books by Cecil Day-Lewis…
“First, I do not sit down at my desk to put into verse something that is already clear in my mind. If it were clear in my mind, I should have no incentive or need to write about it. We do not write in order to be understood; we write in order to understand.”
Cecil Day Lewis

“In June we picked the clover,
And sea-shells in July:
There was no silence at the door,
No word from the sky.

A hand came out of August
And flicked his life away:
We had not time to bargain, mope,
Moralize, or pray.”
Cecil Day-Lewis, Overtures to Death and Other Poems

“A way of using words to say things which could not possibly be said in any other way, things which in a sense do not exist till they are born … in poetry.”
C. Day Lewis

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