Steven Shaviro


Website

Twitter


Average rating: 3.94 · 832 ratings · 68 reviews · 28 distinct worksSimilar authors
Post-Cinematic Affect

4.13 avg rating — 102 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
No Speed Limit: Three Essay...

3.86 avg rating — 111 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Discognition

4.29 avg rating — 76 ratings — published 2016 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Universe of Things: On ...

4.04 avg rating — 84 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Cinematic Body

3.98 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 1993 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Doom Patrols: A Theoretical...

3.91 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 1996
Rate this book
Clear rating
Without Criteria: Kant, Whi...

4.17 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Connected: Or What It Means...

3.62 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Melancholia or, The Romanti...

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Passion and Excess: Blancho...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1990 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Steven Shaviro…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“[Walmart]s largest innovation consists in getting rid of the central Fordist principle of paying the workers enough so that they can afford to buy what they manufacture. Instead, WalMart has pioneered the inverse principle: paying the workers so little that they cannot afford to shop anywhere other than at WalMart. It might even be said, not too hyperbolically, that WalMart has singlehandedly preserved the American economy from total collapse, in that their lowered prices are the only thing that has allowed millions of the “working poor” to retain the status of consumers at all, rather than falling into the “black hole” of total immiseration. WalMart is part and parcel of how the “new economy” has largely been founded upon transferring wealth from the less wealthy to the already-extremely-rich. ”
Steven Shaviro

“Films and music videos, like other media works, are machines for generating affect, and for capitalizing upon, or extracting value from, this affect. As such, they are not ideological superstructures, as an older sort of Marxist criticism would have it. Rather, they lie at the very heart of social production, circulation, and distribution. They generate subjectivity, and they play a crucial role in the valorization of capital.”
Steven Shaviro, Post Cinematic Affect

“For Massumi, affect is primary, non-conscious, asubjective or presubjective, asignifying, unqualified, and intensive; while emotion is derivative, conscious, qualified, and meaningful, a “content” that can be attributed to an already-constituted subject. Emotion is affect captured by a subject, or tamed and reduced to the extent that it becomes commensurate with that subject. Subjects are overwhelmed and traversed by affect, but they have or possess their own emotions.”
Steven Shaviro, Post Cinematic Affect



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Steven to Goodreads.