Armin Navabi

Joshua ...
31 books | 93 friends

Mark Se...
951 books | 196 friends

Jeroen ...
44 books | 10 friends

Justine...
701 books | 772 friends

Sai
Sai
679 books | 135 friends

Thomas ...
116 books | 55 friends

Johanne...
117 books | 268 friends

Hamideh...
239 books | 50 friends

More friends…

Armin Navabi

Goodreads Author


Born
in Tehran, Iran
Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences
Matt Dillahunty

Member Since
June 2014


Armin Navabi is a former Muslim from Iran and the founder of Atheist Republic, a non-profit organization with over one million fans and followers worldwide that is dedicated to offering a safe community for atheists around the world to share their ideas and meet like-minded individuals.

Armin was born and raised in the Islamic Republic of Iran and was indoctrinated thoroughly in the Muslim tradition. After almost losing his life in the pursuit of God’s grace, the devastation of that event motivated him to seek a better understanding of the nature and concept of God and religious belief. Armin’s journey led him to leaving Islam and becoming an atheist. Wanting to reach out to others like himself, Armin continues to examine religion as well as
...more

Armin

This is an interview that Armin Navabi gave to Scott Douglas Jacobsen concerning how Armin remember his mom, and how her courage and dedication affected Armin’s life.

2 likes ·   •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on January 25, 2018 18:59 • 13 views
Average rating: 3.91 · 1,494 ratings · 170 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
Why There Is No God: Simple...

by
3.91 avg rating — 1,371 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Your God Is Too Small: 50 E...

by
3.87 avg rating — 127 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Armin’s Recent Updates

Armin Navabi is now friends with Sara Haddad
Why There Is No God by Armin Navabi
""Not knowing the answer to a question is not a valid excuse for making up a fairytale to explain it."

This is a relatively short book (96 pages) by Armin Navabi, but it still manages to cover a wide range of topics in a clear and concise manner. It..." Read more of this review »
Armin Navabi rated a book it was amazing
Getting Things Done with Todoist by Daniel LeFebvre
Rate this book
Clear rating
Armin Navabi wants to read
Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari
Rate this book
Clear rating
Armin Navabi wants to read
Twelve Infallible Men by Matthew Pierce
Rate this book
Clear rating
Armin Navabi wants to read
God's Debris by Scott Adams
Rate this book
Clear rating
Armin Navabi wants to read
Beyond Religious Freedom by Elizabeth Shakman Hurd
Rate this book
Clear rating
Questions sur les Miracles à M. Claparede, Professeur de Théo... by Voltaire
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”
Voltaire
Armin Navabi wants to read
Contemporary Issues in Islam by Afsaruddin
Rate this book
Clear rating
Armin Navabi rated a book it was amazing
Islam and the Future of Tolerance by Sam   Harris
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Armin's books…
“Not knowing the answer to a question is not a valid excuse for making up a fairytale to explain it.”
Armin Navabi, Why There Is No God: Simple Responses to 20 Common Arguments for the Existence of God

“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” This touches on the heart of the argumentum ad populum fallacy. Physical reality does not require belief to sustain it, and belief will not modify the rules of the universe.”
Armin Navabi, Why There Is No God: Simple Responses to 20 Common Arguments for the Existence of God

“If morality truly stemmed from an all-powerful deity, it would not change over time.”
Armin Navabi, Why There Is No God: Simple Responses to 20 Common Arguments for the Existence of God

“When people ask me if a god created the universe, I tell them that the question itself makes no sense. Time didn’t exist before the big bang, so there is no time for god to make the universe in. It’s like asking directions to the edge of the earth; The Earth is a sphere; it doesn’t have an edge; so looking for it is a futile exercise. We are each free to believe what we want, and it’s my view that the simplest explanation is; there is no god. No one created our universe,and no one directs our fate. This leads me to a profound realization; There is probably no heaven, and no afterlife either. We have this one life to appreciate the grand design of the universe, and for that I am extremely grateful.”
Stephen Hawking

“Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

“If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is an intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.”
Bertrand Russell

“No satisfaction based upon self-deception is solid, and however unpleasant the truth may be, it is better to face it once and for all, to get used to it, and to proceed to build your life in accordance with it.”
Bertrand Russell

“When my husband died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me-it still sometimes happens-and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again. Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don't ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous-not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance. . . . That pure chance could be so generous and so kind. . . . That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time. . . . That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful. . . . The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don't think I'll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.”
Ann Druyan

596 Audiobooks — 8245 members — last activity 1 hour, 12 min ago
Audio & audiobooks are getting more and more popular for commuters & those wanting to squeeze in another book or two a month while doing other activit ...more
50920 Beta Reader Group — 13177 members — last activity 1 hour, 4 min ago
A place to connect writers with Beta readers. Sometimes writers get so involved in the plot they can't see the wood for the trees. Hang on a sec'--tha ...more
220 Goodreads Librarians Group — 84635 members — last activity 8 minutes ago
A place where all Goodreads members can work together to improve the Goodreads book catalog. Non-librarians are welcome to join the group as well, to ...more



No comments have been added yet.