Rosie Blythe

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London, The United Kingdom
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October 2014

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Rosie Blythe lives in London (hence all those crazy British spellings) and when she’s not writing, works as a stylist in television and film.

Average rating: 3.91 · 102 ratings · 21 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Princess Guide to Being...

3.94 avg rating — 80 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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The Princess Guide to Life

3.82 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Retro Reads I love and hate


ICONIC
If you were a teen or tween girl in the 90s / early 2000s, you were probably familiar with the world of Sweet Valley High. Jessica and Elizabeth Wakefield were blonde, 16-year-old twins with "eyes the colour of the Pacific ocean" who ruled over every cool event at Sweet Valley High. (Seriously, if there was a contest to win, a prom or school picnic to organise, an event of any kind, they Read more of this blog post »
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Published on September 11, 2018 06:42

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Retro Reads I love and hate



ICONICIf you were a teen or tween girl in the 90s / early 2000s, you were probably familiar with the world of Sweet Valley High. Jessica and Elizabet Read more of this blog post »
The Princess Guide to Life by Rosie Blythe
"I received this book as Goodreads' First Read from the author.

This was a cool book, maybe not for my generation, but for the next one - but I found also some useful tips how to survive as a woman - even the title gave me some creeps when I first read" Read more of this review »
Rosie Blythe has read
Find the Good by Heather Lende
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Rosie Blythe is now following Ruth and Amber
1248980 8408884
Rosie Blythe rated a book it was amazing
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
The Girl on the Train
by Paula Hawkins (Goodreads Author)
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The story begins slowly, innocuously. Rachel travels into London every day, and like many commuters, she passes her time on the train by looking out of the window. As the 8:04 to Euston trundles slowly past the houses which back onto the railway trac
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The Princess Guide to Life by Rosie Blythe
"I received this book through librarything.com member giveaway for a honest review. I really enjoyed this book, it gave some helpful tips. I will be using the tips that were given in this book. It was also a fun book to read."
3565
“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
Oscar Wilde
More of Rosie's books…
“Whether they’re family or friends, manipulators are difficult to escape from. Give in to their demands and they’ll be happy enough, but if you develop a spine and start saying no, it will inevitably bring a fresh round of head games and emotional blackmail. You’ll notice that breaking free from someone else’s dominance will often result in them accusing you of being selfish. Yes, you’re selfish, because you’ve stopped doing what they want you to do for them. Wow. Can these people hear themselves?!”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“When it comes to the way you present yourself online, the acid test is: Can you imagine Grace Kelly doing it? If you can picture her saying “Dem hos betta watch out imma beat some ass tonite”, then congratulations, you have a much better imagination than mine. Likewise, if you can’t quite see her posting a snapshot of herself drunkenly pole-dancing, think twice about broadcasting those pictures to the world.”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“Lots of people have a “timeline” in mind for their life: the age when they want to get married, have kids, retire. The best advice I ever got was to forget all about this schedule. Why try to squeeze your life into a totally artificial construct based on meaningless rules? You’ll end up doing stupid things, like randomly marrying the guy you happen to be dating when you’re 29 because your self-imposed wedding deadline is age 30. Despite people hotly debating the “correct” age to tick off life’s milestones, it’s different for everyone – there’s no right or wrong answer.”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“Lots of people have a “timeline” in mind for their life: the age when they want to get married, have kids, retire. The best advice I ever got was to forget all about this schedule. Why try to squeeze your life into a totally artificial construct based on meaningless rules? You’ll end up doing stupid things, like randomly marrying the guy you happen to be dating when you’re 29 because your self-imposed wedding deadline is age 30. Despite people hotly debating the “correct” age to tick off life’s milestones, it’s different for everyone – there’s no right or wrong answer.”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“Do that thing you always wanted to do “someday” in the future: get on a plane in your Jackie O shift dress and shades, take a train across Europe wearing red lipstick, buy that sporty two-seater car, spend your money on perfume. Otherwise you might wake up one day with a husband and kids and wonder what you did with all that free time you once had. And if you’re already experiencing the domestic bliss of family life, savour every moment.”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“If your confidence is based purely on the way you look, you’re setting yourself up for a) years of fretting about how to appear perfect, and b) anxiety / despair as the wrinkles inevitably set in. (Not to mention the fact that the world is FULL of pretty girls – you’re going to have to dig a little bit deeper if you want to stand out in the crowd.) Base your self-belief on what’s in your heart and mind; you’ll never lose your inner beauty.”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“Actresses talking about characters they’ve played often use the phrase “strong woman”, which kind of irks me. Firstly, the description appears to be reserved for two kinds of female: the gun-toting chick in tiny-vest-and-shorts combo, or the tough-talking businesswoman who secretly longs for a man to bring out her softer side. So obviously, our idea of strength is pretty narrow and one-dimensional. Secondly, why isn’t Brad Pitt ever asked about how much he enjoys playing a “strong man”? Is it automatically assumed that men’s roles will be complex and interesting?”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“Unforgettable experiences are generally worth splurging on; unlike stuff, memories don’t wear out (or take up space, get dusty, break, or get stolen). If you really want to go and work at an orangutan orphanage in Borneo, it will be worth the cash.”
Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life




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Bookish Jen Hello Sweetie Darling,

Thanks so much for the invite; it is greatly appreciated!

Peace,
Bookish Jen


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