James Williams



Average rating: 3.95 · 823 ratings · 112 reviews · 231 distinct worksSimilar authors
Stand Out of Our Light: Fre...

4.12 avg rating — 460 ratings7 editions
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Bad Breath Free Forever

4.09 avg rating — 45 ratings4 editions
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It Tolls for Thee

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Master Guide for Team Sport...

3.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2007 — 6 editions
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A Process Philosophy of Signs

4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2016 — 3 editions
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Cancel Kindle Unlimited: Ho...

2.29 avg rating — 7 ratings
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Forex Trading Psychology: I...

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2012
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Acid Rayn: The Uprising

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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So Dark: Chapter 1

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Pós-estruturalismo (Coleção...

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“Better than a sharp stick in the eye.”
James Williams
tags: humor, life

“It’s my firm conviction, now more than ever, that the degree to which we are able and willing to struggle for ownership of our attention is the degree to which we are free.”
James Williams, Stand out of our Light: Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy

“For most of human history, when you were born you inherited an off-the-shelf package of religious and cultural constraints. This was a kind of library of limits that was embedded in your social and physical environment. These limits performed certain self-regulatory tasks for you so you didn’t have to take them on yourself. The packages included habits, practices, rituals, social conventions, moral codes, and a myriad of other constraints that had typically evolved over many centuries, if not millennia, to reliably guide – or shall we say design – our lives in the direction of particular values, and to help us give attention to the things that matter most. In the twentieth century the rise of secularism and modernism in the West occasioned the collapse – if not the jettisoning – of many of these off-the-shelf packages of constraints in the cause of the liberation of the individual. In many cases, this rejection occurred on the basis of philosophical or cosmological disagreements with the old packages. This has, of course, had many great benefits. Yet by rejecting entire packages of constraint, we’ve also rejected those constraints that were actually useful for our purposes. “The left’s project of liberation,” writes the American philosopher Matthew Crawford, “led us to dismantle inherited cultural jigs that once imposed a certain coherence (for better and worse) on individual lives. This created a vacuum of cultural authority that has been filled, opportunistically, with attentional landscapes that get installed by whatever ‘choice architect’ brings the most energy to the task – usually because it sees the profit potential.” The German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk, in his book You Must Change Your Life, has called for a reclamation of this particular aspect of religion – its habits and practices – which he calls “anthropotechnics.”6 When you dismantle existing boundaries in your environment, it frees you from their limitations, but it requires you to bring your own boundaries where you didn’t have to before. Sometimes, taking on this additional self-regulatory burden is totally worth it. Other times, though, the cost is too high. According to the so-called “ego-depletion” hypothesis, our self-control, our willpower, is a finite resource.7 So when the self-regulatory cost of bringing your own boundaries is high enough, it takes away willpower that could have been spent on something else.”
James Williams, Stand out of our Light: Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy



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