Thomas Armstrong

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Thomas Armstrong

Goodreads Author


Born
in Fargo, North Dakota, The United States
Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences
James Joyce, Jorge Luis Borges, David Foster Wallace, Thomas Pynchon, ...more

Member Since
August 2007


I am the author of nineteen books including my latest: If Einstein Ran The Schools: Revitalizing U.S. Education (Praeger).

My other books include, Mindfulness in the Classroom, Smarts! Everybody's Got Them, The Power of the Adolescent Brain, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strategies to Help Students with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life, The Power of Neurodiversity: Unleashing the Advantages of Your Differently Wired Brain, The Human Odyssey: Navigating the Twelve Stages of Life, Their Own Way, 7 Kinds of Smart, Awakening Your Child's Natural Genius, Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, The Myth of the A.D.H. D. Child, and The Radiant Child. My books have been translated into 28 languages including Spanish, Hebrew, Chinese, Dan
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Thomas Armstrong A Thing that nobody had ever conceived of, began to crawl across the United States. Then it stopped at the White House and began to govern.
Thomas Armstrong You know, I'd say write every day, but I don't write every day, so what kind of advice would THAT be? It does help to have an obsessional quality to y…moreYou know, I'd say write every day, but I don't write every day, so what kind of advice would THAT be? It does help to have an obsessional quality to your personality - my mind gets a book idea and then like a dog at the other end of a game of tug rope, I just won't let go, even if years go by. It also helps to have some pathology - if everything has gone right in your life, then there's no dark material or conflict to heat things up. Oh yes, one other really big piece of advice: READ A LOT! And don't read mediocre writers - read the best writers that are out there. Fill your mind with the greatest writing voices of all time, and over time they will mingle and coalesce inside you, and out of that rich mixture will emerge your own authentic writer's voice (or voices if you do characters!).(less)
Average rating: 3.92 · 2,290 ratings · 316 reviews · 33 distinct worksSimilar authors
Neurodiversity: Discovering...

3.96 avg rating — 536 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
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Seven Kinds of Smart: Ident...

3.89 avg rating — 448 ratings — published 1993 — 6 editions
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In Their Own Way: Discoveri...

4.09 avg rating — 192 ratings — published 1965 — 12 editions
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Multiple Intelligences in t...

3.88 avg rating — 258 ratings — published 1994 — 21 editions
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You're Smarter Than You Thi...

3.80 avg rating — 168 ratings — published 2002 — 12 editions
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The Power of the Adolescent...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 106 ratings5 editions
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Neurodiversity in the Class...

3.90 avg rating — 92 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Awakening Genius in the Cla...

3.61 avg rating — 83 ratings — published 1998 — 6 editions
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Myth Of The A.D.D. Child

3.83 avg rating — 124 ratings — published 1997 — 5 editions
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The Human Odyssey: Navigati...

4.21 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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More books by Thomas Armstrong…

Alert! The Trumpona Virus (TRUVID-20) Threatens Us All!

We’re all focused on the COVID-19 virus right now, but an even greater threat to our nation and our world is the Trumpona Virus (TRUVID-20).  Viruses don’t have the ability to replicate themselves, so what they do is insinuate themselves into a cell body and deceptively and parasitically co-opt the mechanisms and materials of that […]
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Published on July 07, 2020 19:44

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Indaba My Children
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The Tale of Genji
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Emile, or On Educ...
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Alert! The Trumpona Virus (TRUVID-20) Threatens Us All!

We’re all focused on the COVID-19 virus right now, but an even greater threat to our nation and our world is the Trumpona Virus (TRUVID-20).  Viruses Read more of this blog post »
Emile, or On Education by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
“The child raised for his station, never leaving it, could not be exposed to the disadvantages of another. But given the mobility of human things, given the unsettled and restless spirit of this age which upsets everything in each generation, can one conceive of a method more senseless than raising a child as though he never had to leave his room, as though he were going to be constantly surrounded by his servants? If the unfortunate makes a single step on the earth, if he goes down a single degree, he is lost. This is not teaching him to bear suffering; it is training him to feel it. One thinks only of preserving one’s child. That is not enough. One ought to teach him to preserve himself as a man. to bear the blows of fate, to brave opulence and poverty, to live, if he has to. in freezing Iceland or on Malta’s burning rocks. You may very well take precautions against his dying. He will nevertheless have to die. And though his death were not the product of your efforts, still these eff ...more Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser
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I enjoyed this book, especially the crisscrossing careers of some of the main characters (no spoiler alert will be necessary). Dreiser is a typically American writer, giving us a time capsule of life during the turn of the 19th-20th century in the Un ...more
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A Thing that nobody had ever conceived of, began to crawl across the United States. Then it stopped at the White House and began to govern.
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Kim by Rudyard Kipling
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I didn't expect to enjoy this book very much with what I'd imagined would be its colonialist attitude. However, I found that I was actually delighted with Kipling's acute perspective on life in India. I have been to India three times, and I found his ...more
Thomas Armstrong made a comment in the group Neurodiversity ReadsIntroductions topic
" I'm a 68-year old male who has a mood disorder (unipolar depression) currently (thank God) in remission. I'm an author (of 17 books), including two on ...more "
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Other Voices, Other Rooms by Truman Capote
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All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren
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Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh
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More of Thomas's books…
“From the standpoint of education, genius means essentially 'giving birth to the joy in learning.' I'd like to suggest that this is the central task of all educators. It is the genius of the student that is the driving force behind all learning. Before educators take on any of the other important issues in learning, they must first have a thorough understanding of what lies at the core of each student's intrinsic motivation to learn, and that motivation originates in each student's genius.”
Thomas Armstrong, Awakening Genius in the Classroom

“The word creativity is closely linked to the word genius, since both words have the root meaning 'to give birth.' Essentially, creativity designates the capacity to give birth to new ways of looking at things, the ability to make novel connections between disparate things, and the knack for seeing things that might be missed by the typical way of viewing life.”
Thomas Armstrong, Awakening Genius in the Classroom

“Children and adolescents, being relatively new to life, are naturally creative because they haven't been brainwashed, so to speak, by the conventional attitudes of society. Consequently, students are always coming up with novel images, words, and actions that my delight, enlighten, or inspire adults....Creativity has not been the subject of intense focus, extensive research, or high levels of funding in American education.”
Thomas Armstrong, Awakening Genius in the Classroom

“Each second we live is a new and unique moment of the universe, a moment that will never be again And what do we teach our children? We teach them that two and two make four, and that Paris is the capital of France. When will we also teach them what they are? We should say to each of them: Do you know what you are? You are a marvel. You are unique. In all the years that have passed, there has never been another child like you. Your legs, your arms, your clever fingers, the way you move. You may become a Shakespeare, a Michaelangelo, a Beethoven. You have the capacity for anything. Yes, you are a marvel. And when you grow up, can you then harm another who is, like you, a marvel? You must work, we must all work, to make the world worthy of its children.”
Pablo Casals

“The child raised for his station, never leaving it, could not be exposed to the disadvantages of another. But given the mobility of human things, given the unsettled and restless spirit of this age which upsets everything in each generation, can one conceive of a method more senseless than raising a child as though he never had to leave his room, as though he were going to be constantly surrounded by his servants? If the unfortunate makes a single step on the earth, if he goes down a single degree, he is lost. This is not teaching him to bear suffering; it is training him to feel it. One thinks only of preserving one’s child. That is not enough. One ought to teach him to preserve himself as a man. to bear the blows of fate, to brave opulence and poverty, to live, if he has to. in freezing Iceland or on Malta’s burning rocks. You may very well take precautions against his dying. He will nevertheless have to die. And though his death were not the product of your efforts, still these efforts would be ill conceived. It is less a question of keeping him from dying than of making him live. To live is not to breathe; it is to act; it is to make use of our organs, our senses, our faculties, of all the parts of ourselves which give us the sentiment of our existence.”
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education

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