John Dickie

John Dickie



Average rating: 3.89 · 2,663 ratings · 171 reviews · 32 distinct worksSimilar authors
Cosa Nostra: A History of t...

3.89 avg rating — 2,060 ratings — published 2004 — 51 editions
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Delizia!: The Epic History ...

3.74 avg rating — 283 ratings — published 2007 — 20 editions
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Blood Brotherhoods: The Ris...

3.96 avg rating — 183 ratings — published 2011 — 16 editions
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Mafia Republic: Italy's Cri...

4.18 avg rating — 109 ratings — published 2011 — 11 editions
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The New Mandarins: How Brit...

3.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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Inside The Foreign Office

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings2 editions
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Working with the Residentia...

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3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2011
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Blood Brotherhoods: A Histo...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Pokrevní bratrstvo

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Producers and Consumers in ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2005 — 3 editions
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“French rule brought a whole series of innovations in the way the Kingdom was run. Out went feudalism, and in came private property. Out went a messy assemblage of local customs, baronial and church jurisdictions, and public ordinances: in came a new code of civil law and the beginnings of a police force. The southern part of the Italian peninsula began to resemble a modern, centralised state.”
John Dickie, Blood Brotherhoods: A History of Italy's Three Mafias

“Mafiosi, for Franchetti, were entrepreneurs in violence, specialists who had developed what today would be called the most sophisticated business model in the marketplace. Under the leadership of their bosses, mafia bands ‘invested’ violence in various commercial spheres in order to extort protection money and guarantee monopolies. This was what he called the violence industry. As Franchetti wrote, [in the violence industry] the mafia boss . . . acts as capitalist, impresario and manager. He unifies the management of the crimes committed . . . he regulates the way labour and duties are divided out, and controls discipline amongst the workers. (Discipline is indispensable in this as in any other industry if abundant and constant profits are to be obtained.) It is the mafia boss’s job to judge from circumstances whether the acts of violence should be suspended for a while, or multiplied and made fiercer. He has to adapt to market conditions to choose which operations to carry out, which people to exploit, which form of violence to use.”
John Dickie, Cosa Nostra: A History of the Sicilian Mafia: A History of the Sicilian Mafia

“Tutti colpevoli, nessuno colpevole,’ as the Italian saying has it: ‘If everyone is guilty, no one is guilty.”
John Dickie, Cosa Nostra: A History of the Sicilian Mafia: A History of the Sicilian Mafia

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