Charles Bettelheim





Charles Bettelheim


Born
in Paris, France
November 20, 1913

Died
July 20, 2006

Genre

Influences


Economist and historian, founder of the Center for the Study of Modes of Industrialization (CEMI : Centre pour l'Étude des Modes d'Industrialisation) at the Sorbonne), economic advisor to the governments of several developing countries during the period of decolonization. He was very influential in France's New Left, and considered one of "the most visible Marxists in the capitalist world" (Le Monde, April 4, 1972), in France as well as in Spain, Italy, Latin America, and India.

Average rating: 4.02 · 65 ratings · 3 reviews · 22 distinct works
Class Struggles in the U. S...

4.18 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1976 — 5 editions
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Cultural Revolution and Ind...

4.20 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1974 — 4 editions
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Economic Calculation and Fo...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1975 — 3 editions
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Class Struggles In The Ussr

4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings3 editions
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The Transition To Socialist...

4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1974 — 4 editions
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India Independent

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings2 editions
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Class Struggles in the USSR...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Die Deutsche Wirtschaft Unt...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1974
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Class Struggles in the U. S...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating3 editions
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Planificacion y Crecimiento...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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More books by Charles Bettelheim…
“Those who claim to be Marxists cannot confine themselves to condemning or deploring political acts; they have also to explain them. Regrets and wishes may help the people to endure their woes, but they do not help them either to perceive their causes or to struggle to get rid of them or to prevent their reemergence. By explaining the reasons for something that does indeed deserve condemnation from the standpoint of the interests of the working people, we can contribute, however, to causing political forces to evolve in such a way that the "regrettable" events do not recur.”
Charles Bettelheim, Class Struggles in the U. S. S. R. First Period: 1917-1923

“At another level of analysis, economism is characterized by the fact that it tends to identify productive forces with the material means of production, thus denying that the principal productive force consists of the producers themselves: consequently, economism ascribes the major role in the building of socialism not to the initiative of the working people but to the accumulation of new means of production and technical knowledge.”
Charles Bettelheim, Class Struggles in the U. S. S. R. First Period: 1917-1923

“To get to the root of the matter, let it be recalled that political relations are never "decreed": in the last analysis they are always the form assumed by fundamental social relations at the level of production. As Marx wrote in the introduction to his Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, "each mode of production produces its specific legal relations, political forms, etc."[1] This determination of political forms by modes of production enables us to understand how it was that the limited extent to which changes were effected at the level of production relations (particularly in the division of labor in the factories, the division of labor between town and country, and class divisions in the rural areas), tended in the final analysis to offset the achievements of the October Revolution. Viewed over a period of several decades, this determining relation also explains why, in the absence of a renewed revolutionary offensive attacking production relations in depth, and of a political line permitting such an offensive to develop successfully, the dictatorship of the proletariat itself has ended by being annihilated, and why we are seeing in the Russia of today, under new conditions, a resurgence of internal political relations and of political relations with the rest of the world which look like a "reproduction" of bourgeois political relations, and even of those of the tsarist period.”
Charles Bettelheim, Class Struggles in the U. S. S. R. First Period: 1917-1923