Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi


Born
Kampala , Uganda
Website

Genre


Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, a Ugandan novelist and short story writer, has a PhD from Lancaster University.

Her first novel, Kintu, won the Kwani Manuscript Prize in 2013 and was longlisted for the Etisalat Prize in 2014. Her story "Let's Tell This Story Properly" won the 2014 Commonwealth Short Story Prize.

She is currently working on her second novel and a collection of short stories, Travel is to See, Return is to Tell. Jennifer lives in Manchester, UK

Average rating: 4.12 · 1,639 ratings · 310 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Kintu

4.13 avg rating — 1,501 ratings — published 2014 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Let's Tell This Story Properly

4.05 avg rating — 134 ratings — published 2019 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The First Woman

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Come With Us: Excerpted fro...

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bare Lit 2016

by
4.30 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2017 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“After Independence, Uganda -- A European artefact -- was still forming as a country rather than a kingdom in the minds of ordinary Gandas. They were lulled by the fact that Kabaka Muteesa II was made president of the new Uganda. Nonetheless most of them felt that 'Uganda' should remain a kingdom for the Ganda under their kabaka so that things would go back to the way things were before the Europeans came. Uganda was a patchwork of fifty or so tribes. The Ganda did not want it. The union of tribes brought no apparent advantage to them apart from a deluge of immigrants from wherever, coming to Kampala to take their land. Meanwhile, the other fifty or so tribes looked on flabbergasted as the British drew borders and told them that they were now Ugandans. Their histories, cultures and identities were overwritten by the mispronounced name of an insufferably haughty tribe propped above them. But to the Ganda, the reality of Uganda as opposed to Buganda only sank in when, after independence, Obote overran the kabakas lubiri with tanks, exiling Muteesa and banning all kingdoms. The desecration of their kingdom by foreigners paralyzed the Ganda for decades.”
Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi

“In the media, an avalanche of negative images of an Africa quickly sinking into anarchy so soon after independence overwhelmed him. Horror stories were broadcast with glee and broke the resolve of so many black activists.”
Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, Kintu

“The image Miisi had constructed in Britain of the noble African rooted in his cultural values shunning westernization was a myth. What he returned to were people struggling to survive, who in the process had lost the ability to discern the vivid colours of right and wrong. Anything that gave them a chance to survive was moral.”
Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, Kintu

Polls

What should our Read Around the World book for June be? (Africa)

Voting will close on 15 April. You can change your vote at any time prior to the poll closing.

Please note that a voting for a book implies an intent to read and take part in discussion

 
  6 votes, 28.6%

 
  5 votes, 23.8%

 
  3 votes, 14.3%

Nehanda by Yvonne Vera (Zimbabwe)
 
  3 votes, 14.3%

 
  2 votes, 9.5%

 
  2 votes, 9.5%

More...

Topics Mentioning This Author



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jennifer to Goodreads.