Simon Dudley



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Laura McNaughty: Strangers ...

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Laura McNaughty: Laura's Re...

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A Contrarian view: Why the ...

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Laura McNaughty: The Injure...

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Laura McNaughty: Strangers ...

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Laura McNaughty: Black Jack...

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Laura McNaughty: The Conker

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“Then, a historic event changed everything for my family: Henry Ford created the Model T. Others soon followed suit, inventing their own automobiles. The people who had been buying and renting carts started buying trucks or small cars instead. Despite my family’s expertise in their craft, nobody wanted a car with wooden wheels. Very quickly, within the space of 10 years, their business started to collapse.”
Simon Dudley, The End of Certainty: How To Thrive When Playing By The Rules Is A Losing Strategy

“The best-selling phone from the year 2015 is twice the size of the Motorola Razr, the battery barely lasts a day, and if you drop it, it’s $300 to replace the screen. Back in 2000 you might wonder how that’s an improvement. The answer: The iPhone of today is a far better device than a Motorola Razr from 2000 because it has redefined what success looks like.”
Simon Dudley, The End of Certainty: How To Thrive When Playing By The Rules Is A Losing Strategy

“My favorite story of this concept is where, one Thanksgiving, a little girl is helping her mother in the kitchen. “Mom, I see you cut the ham in half. Why did you do that?” she asks her mother. “Oh, it’s a family tradition. We cut the ham in half and we put one half in each oven,” the mother replies. “We bought this house specifically because it had a double oven and it took us months longer than we thought it would to find a house that had a double oven.” “But why do you cut the ham in half?” the daughter asks again. “Well, it’s family tradition and we’ve always done that. I think it makes the food better or something, I don’t really know the answer. Why don’t you ask Grandma?” The little girl goes and asks Grandma and says, “Grandma, why do you cut the ham in half?” “Well, that’s a good question, dear,” Grandma replied. “When your grandfather and I bought our house, we had to spend thousands of dollars extra changing the kitchen around to buy a double oven, because, after all, simply nobody had double ovens in those days. It was really painful, I remember, but it’s a family tradition and we knew it mattered.” The daughter asks again, “Well, why do you do it?” “Well, I don’t really know,” Grandma says. “I don’t know, maybe it’s something to do with the food being better or something. Why don’t you ask your great-grandma?” Great-Grandma is sitting in the living room and she’s old and frail. The little girl goes up to her and says, “Great-Grandma, why does this family always cut the ham in half and cook it in two ovens?” She goes, “Well, I have no idea why my daughter and granddaughter do it, but I did it simply because the oven wasn’t big enough.”
Simon Dudley, The End of Certainty: How To Thrive When Playing By The Rules Is A Losing Strategy



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