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David Joy

Goodreads Author


Born
in Charlotte, The United States
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Influences
Larry Brown, Daniel Woodrell, William Gay, Ron Rash, Jim Harrison

Member Since
April 2014

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David Joy is the author of the Edgar nominated novel Where All Light Tends to Go (Putnam, 2015), as well as the novels The Weight Of This World (Putnam, 2017), The Line That Held Us (Putnam, 2018), and When These Mountains Burn (Putnam, 2020). His memoir, Growing Gills: A Fly Fisherman's Journey (Bright Mountain Books, 2011), was a finalist for the Reed Environmental Writing Award and the Ragan Old North State Award for Creative Nonfiction. His latest stories and essays have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Garden & Gun, and The Bitter Southerner. He is the recipient of an artist fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council. His work is represented by Julia Kenny of Dunow, Carlson & Lerner Literary Agency. He lives in Jackson Cou ...more

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David Joy If you enjoy that type of darker story I'd suggest reading all of Ron Rash's work, particularly the short story collections (Chemistry, Burning Bright…moreIf you enjoy that type of darker story I'd suggest reading all of Ron Rash's work, particularly the short story collections (Chemistry, Burning Bright, Nothing Gold Can Stay), though I really like his novels as well, my favorite being The World Made Straight. If that's the type of story you're into, you might want to broaden to the rest of the South and read Larry Brown, William Gay, Barry Hannah, and Harry Crews, who I consider the godfathers of what I'm trying to do, their own writing being rooted in Faulkner and O'Connor and even McCarthy.

If you're wanting to stay within the North Carolina mountains, Charles Frazier and Wayne Caldwell are really great, but if we can open the conversation up to all of Appalachia the list gets really big. I love Silas House, especially his novel A Parchment of Leaves. As far as women, read Lee Smith and Darnell Arnoult and Pamela Duncan and Sharyn McCrumb.

There are a lot of really great young writers too, writers like Mark Powell and Charles Dodd White and Denton Loving and Sheldon Lee Compton. My favorite novel this year has been Robert Gipe's Trampoline, which is set in the Kentucky coal fields. There are just loads and loads of really talented writers in this region.

Also check out some anthologies like Degrees of Elevation, which collects a lot of these writers, with a new installment of that anthology series coming out this summer called Appalachia Now. There are also some really great journals like Still or Drafthorse or Appalachian Heritage that showcase a lot of emerging talent in the region. These journals are online, for the most part, and free to read.

If you're still reading this then that ought to keep your bedside table stacked up for a while. Hope that helps.(less)
David Joy
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Average rating: 3.78 · 12,983 ratings · 2,288 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Where All Light Tends to Go

3.74 avg rating — 6,188 ratings — published 2015 — 14 editions
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The Line That Held Us

3.72 avg rating — 4,679 ratings — published 2018 — 8 editions
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The Weight of This World

3.94 avg rating — 1,619 ratings — published 2017 — 8 editions
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When These Mountains Burn

4.26 avg rating — 482 ratings — published 2020 — 5 editions
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Gather at the River: Twenty...

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4.27 avg rating — 37 ratings2 editions
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Growing Gills: A Fly Fisher...

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4.37 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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Là où les lumières se perde...

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Appalachia Now

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4.07 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
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David Joy is now friends with Christine Lenzen
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F*ckface by Leah  Hampton
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As fine a collection as you are ever likely to encounter. Leah Hampton may very well be Appalachia's finest story writer at work.
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Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer
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One of the most beautiful books I've ever read. I don't know what else to say. It left me at a loss for words. Read it. Just read it.
David Joy answered a question about There There:
There There by Tommy Orange
"You know what Gertrude Stein said about Oakland?" Rob says.

Dene shakes his head no but actually knows, actually googled quotes about Oakland when researching his project. He knows exactly what the guy is about to say.

"There is no there there," he sa See Full Answer
David Joy rated a book it was amazing
There There by Tommy Orange
There There
by Tommy Orange (Goodreads Author)
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If a week ago you’d told me I’d read a novel better than Richard Powers’ The Overstory this year, I’d have said I was doubtful. If you’d told me it would be a debut novel, I’d have said you were out of your mind. Nevertheless, here I am reading a boo ...more
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The Overstory by Richard Powers
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Trying to explain Richard Powers' Overstory a few weeks back I told someone that it was as if Wendell Berry had written a work of magical realism. I don't know if that's exactly right or not now, but I know that this novel is something different than ...more
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The Last Cowboys by John Branch
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John Branch's resume speaks for itself. Pulitzer. PEN. Flat out, he's one of the most, if not THE most, talented sports writers at work. His essay "Deliverance From 27,000 Feet" might've been my favorite thing I read last year. Now comes The Last Cow ...more
616469
David Joy rated a book it was amazing
The Line That Held Us by David    Joy
The Line That Held Us
by David Joy (Goodreads Author)
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I wanted to write a book as if William Gay and Flannery O'Connor co-wrote McCarthy's Child Of God. I wanted to create a "bad guy" as memorable as Lester Ballard, The Misfit, or the Paper-Hanger. This was as close as I could get to that.
More of David's books…
“That kind of love wasn’t for anyone outside the two of them. It was private and silent, sufficient as grace.”
David Joy, The Line That Held Us

“There wasn’t any way out of that darkness but forward.”
David Joy, Where All Light Tends to Go

“For as tough as the men were in these mountains, the women had always been stone. They were used to loss, accustomed to never having enough. They were fit for the harshness of this world.”
David Joy, The Line That Held Us

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“They lay silently. She was staring at something across the room. She was making him feel uncomfortable. 'It wouldn't work. It's the attraction of opposites,' he said.

We're not opposites.'

I don't mean just you and me. Women fall in love when they get to know you. Men are just the opposite. When they finally know you they're ready to leave.”
James Salter

“Some souls aren't worth saving, I thought. There're some souls that even the devil wants no part of.”
David Joy, Where All Light Tends to Go

“There was a place where all light tends to go, and I reckon that was heaven.”
David Joy, Where All Light Tends to Go

“Light never shined on a man like me and that was certain. In a lot of ways, that made men like Daddy the lucky ones to have only ever known the darkness. Knowing only darkness, a man doesn't have to get his heart broken in search of the light. I envied him for that.”
David Joy, Where All Light Tends to Go

“Only the middle ground of this wicked world mattered, the vast gap that stretched between, and those who were born with enough grit to brave it.”
David Joy, Where All Light Tends to Go

616469 The Bitter Southerner Book Club — 332 members — last activity Jan 12, 2020 08:20AM
A place for Bitter Southerner Family Members to discuss their favorite Southern books of the moment — and in history. We've loaded the shelf with book ...more



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