Alexander William Williamson

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Alexander William Williamson


Born
in London, England, The United Kingdom
May 01, 1824

Died
May 06, 1904

Website

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Influences


Alexander William Williamson FRS (1 May 1824 – 6 May 1904) was an English chemist of Scottish descent. He is best known today for the Williamson ether synthesis.

After working under Leopold Gmelin at Heidelberg, and Justus von Liebig at Gießen, Williamson spent three years in Paris studying higher mathematics under Comte. In 1849, Williamson was appointed professor of practical chemistry at University College, London, and from 1855 until his retirement in 1887 he also held the professorship of chemistry. In 1855 he married Emma Catherine Key, the third daughter of Thomas Hewitt Key. Williamson died on 6 May 1904, at Hindhead, Surrey, England, and was buried at Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

Williamson is credited for his research on the format
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Chemistry for Students

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Chemistry for Students

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Papers on Etherification an...

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Problems from ... 'Chemistr...

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Journeys In North China, Ma...

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More books by Alexander William Williamson…
“Not one of them [formulae] can be shown to have any existence, so that the formula of one of the simplest of organic bodies is confused by the introduction of unexplained symbols for imaginary differences in the mode of combination of its elements... It would be just as reasonable to describe an oak tree as composed of blocks and chips and shavings to which it may be reduced by the hatchet, as by Dr Kolbe's formula to describe acetic acid as containing the products which may be obtained from it by destructive influences. A Kolbe botanist would say that half the chips are united with some of the blocks by the force parenthesis; the other half joined to this group in a different way, described by a buckle; shavings stuck on to these in a third manner, comma; and finally, a compound of shavings and blocks united together by a fourth force, juxtaposition, is joined to the main body by a fifth force, full stop.”
Alexander William Williamson