Pyotr Kapitsa


Born
in Kronstadt, Russian Empire, Russian Federation
July 08, 1894

Died
April 08, 1984

Website

Genre

Influences


Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa or Peter Kapitza (Russian Пётр Леонидович Капица) (8 July [O.S. 26 June] 1894 – 8 April 1984) was a leading Soviet physicist and Nobel laureate.

Kapitsa was born in Kronstadt, Russian Empire to Leonid Petrovich Kapitsa, a military engineer who constructed fortifications. Kapitsa's studies were interrupted by the First World War, in which he served as an ambulance driver for two years on the Polish front. He graduated from the Petrograd Polytechnical Institute in 1918. He subsequently studied in Britain, working for over ten years with Ernest Rutherford in the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University, and founding the influential Kapitza club. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1929 and was the first di
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Average rating: 4.0 · 1 rating · 0 reviews · 9 distinct works
Kísérlet, elmélet, gyakorlat

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1980 — 3 editions
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Kapitza in Cambridge and Mo...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1990 — 4 editions
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Society and the Environment...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1978
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Ponimaete Li Vy Fiziku?

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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Nauka I Sovremennoe Obshche...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1998
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P. L. Kapitsa-Letters to Mo...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1989
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Collected Papers of P. L. K...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1986 — 2 editions
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Engelbert Kaempfers Geschic...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1981
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Engelbert Kaempfers Geschic...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
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More books by Pyotr Kapitsa…
“The year that Rutherford died (1938) there disappeared forever the happy days of free scientific work which gave us such delight in our youth. Science has lost her freedom. Science has become a productive force. She has become rich but she has become enslaved and part of her is veiled in secrecy. I do not know whether Rutherford would continue to joke and laugh as he used to.”
Pyotr Kapitsa