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Michael Kamakana

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Michael Kamakana

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Born
in Calgary , Canada
Website

Genre

Influences
Philip K Dick, Stanislaw Lem, Umberto Eco, Arthur C Clarke, Jorge Luis ...more

Member Since
March 2010


Michael is my Canadian name, translated variously as ‘close to god’ or ‘right hand of god’, my father is Canadian of irish-scot descent. Kamakana (all short 'a's) is my Hawai’ian name, translated as 'The Gift’, as I was an unplanned baby. My mother is Hawai’ian. I was born in Calgary, Canada, grow up in and near Calgary except for Bruxelles, Belgique, when I am seven, and Kailua-Kaneohe on Oahu, Hawai’i, when I am thirteen. Father is a Theoretical Chemistry Professor at University of Calgary, my mother is a teacher-librarian, both now retired. My brother is a lawyer researching Fellow at University, and though I study at University (Anthropology, Archaeology, Art, Drama, English, French, History, Linguists, Philosophy, and Psychology) I nev ...more

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Michael Kamakana The man purchases the latest computer that promises to help him write- beyond correcting spelling and punctuation- and over the years he connects his …moreThe man purchases the latest computer that promises to help him write- beyond correcting spelling and punctuation- and over the years he connects his consciousness to it, succeeds beyond his dreams, overwhelmed by result he means to save it, but hits the wrong key and deletes all hundred thousand words. The end.(less)
Average rating: 3.44 · 34 ratings · 23 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
Advent

3.30 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2019 — 4 editions
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4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2018 — 2 editions
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The gift

so, this is what blog means? ok. please be patient as i have never done this before... do not really know what to do/say/whatever but yes i am listening...
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Published on July 03, 2019 14:29 Tags: start
A Path with Heart...
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Evolving Dharma: ...
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Michael’s Recent Updates

Michael wants to read
Kindness, Clarity, and Insight by Dalai Lama XIV
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Samsara, Nirvana, and Buddha Nature by Dalai Lama
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An Introduction to Buddhism by Dalai Lama XIV
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if you like this review, i now have website: www.michaelkamakana.com

230206: very good introductory text. am reading a lot of phil-indic-buddhism (82) and buddhism-etc (147) in order to absorb from many perspectives, many voices, many works, basic bud
...more
Michael and 105 other people liked Jaidee 's review of Paris Trance:
Paris Trance by Geoff Dyer
"5 "robust, joyous, romantic" stars !!

5th Favorite Read of 2018

This is a novel that made my heart hurt. Hurled me into my twenties where carefree days were the norm and jaded attitudes toward the world and others were still not met on my life journ" Read more of this review »
Doing Philosophy Personally by Dwayne Tunstall
"Doing Philosophy Personally

Dwayne Tunstall, Associate Professor of Philosophy and African American Studies at Grand Valley State University, has taught me a great deal about the American idealist philosopher Josiah Royce, particularly in his first bo" Read more of this review »
Reporting Civil Rights, Part One by Clayborne Carson
"A Priceless Documentary Of America's Struggle For Civil Rights -- 1

America's largest, most continuous, and most pressing domestic issue has been the treatment it has accorded black Americans. Similarly, the most important and valuable social movement" Read more of this review »
Michael rated a book really liked it
An Introduction to Buddhism by Dalai Lama XIV
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if you like this review, i now have website: www.michaelkamakana.com

230206: very good introductory text. am reading a lot of phil-indic-buddhism (82) and buddhism-etc (147) in order to absorb from many perspectives, many voices, many works, basic bud
...more
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Mansions of the Moon by Shyam Selvadurai
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230202: perhaps not four if you do not know some buddhism, but I find it entrancing, covering the youth, young marriage, enlightenment, of the buddha (awakened one) from the perspect
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Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism by Erich Fromm
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230201: as artefact of its time (midcentury western culture), this remind me of the rather simplified poetics of The Beats, though it feels quaint. neither psychoanalysis nor zen is
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Michael finished reading
Mansions of the Moon by Shyam Selvadurai
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Quotes by Michael Kamakana  (?)
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“A billion neutrinos go swimming in heavy water: one gets wet.”
Michael Kamakana

“You should date a girl who reads.
Date a girl who reads. Date a girl who spends her money on books instead of clothes, who has problems with closet space because she has too many books. Date a girl who has a list of books she wants to read, who has had a library card since she was twelve.

Find a girl who reads. You’ll know that she does because she will always have an unread book in her bag. She’s the one lovingly looking over the shelves in the bookstore, the one who quietly cries out when she has found the book she wants. You see that weird chick sniffing the pages of an old book in a secondhand book shop? That’s the reader. They can never resist smelling the pages, especially when they are yellow and worn.

She’s the girl reading while waiting in that coffee shop down the street. If you take a peek at her mug, the non-dairy creamer is floating on top because she’s kind of engrossed already. Lost in a world of the author’s making. Sit down. She might give you a glare, as most girls who read do not like to be interrupted. Ask her if she likes the book.

Buy her another cup of coffee.

Let her know what you really think of Murakami. See if she got through the first chapter of Fellowship. Understand that if she says she understood James Joyce’s Ulysses she’s just saying that to sound intelligent. Ask her if she loves Alice or she would like to be Alice.

It’s easy to date a girl who reads. Give her books for her birthday, for Christmas, for anniversaries. Give her the gift of words, in poetry and in song. Give her Neruda, Pound, Sexton, Cummings. Let her know that you understand that words are love. Understand that she knows the difference between books and reality but by god, she’s going to try to make her life a little like her favorite book. It will never be your fault if she does.

She has to give it a shot somehow.

Lie to her. If she understands syntax, she will understand your need to lie. Behind words are other things: motivation, value, nuance, dialogue. It will not be the end of the world.

Fail her. Because a girl who reads knows that failure always leads up to the climax. Because girls who read understand that all things must come to end, but that you can always write a sequel. That you can begin again and again and still be the hero. That life is meant to have a villain or two.

Why be frightened of everything that you are not? Girls who read understand that people, like characters, develop. Except in the Twilight series.

If you find a girl who reads, keep her close. When you find her up at 2 AM clutching a book to her chest and weeping, make her a cup of tea and hold her. You may lose her for a couple of hours but she will always come back to you. She’ll talk as if the characters in the book are real, because for a while, they always are.

You will propose on a hot air balloon. Or during a rock concert. Or very casually next time she’s sick. Over Skype.

You will smile so hard you will wonder why your heart hasn’t burst and bled out all over your chest yet. You will write the story of your lives, have kids with strange names and even stranger tastes. She will introduce your children to the Cat in the Hat and Aslan, maybe in the same day. You will walk the winters of your old age together and she will recite Keats under her breath while you shake the snow off your boots.

Date a girl who reads because you deserve it. You deserve a girl who can give you the most colorful life imaginable. If you can only give her monotony, and stale hours and half-baked proposals, then you’re better off alone. If you want the world and the worlds beyond it, date a girl who reads.

Or better yet, date a girl who writes.”
Rosemarie Urquico

“That's it then. This is how it ends. I haven't even read Proust.”
James Turner, Rex Libris Volume Two: Book Of Monsters

“We live for books.”
Umberto Eco

“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.”
William Shakespeare, The Tempest

“One's life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others.”
Simone de Beauvoir

7160 Japanese Literature — 3612 members — last activity 19 hours, 19 min ago
A group for people who enjoy literature written by Japanese authors.
1194 Philosophy — 4876 members — last activity Jan 27, 2023 08:15AM
What is Philosophy? Why is it important? How do you use it? This group looks at these questions and others: ethics, government, economics, skepticism, ...more
154805 On Paths Unknown — 432 members — last activity Feb 02, 2023 08:22AM
"On paths unknown, we tread with wonder. Through a glass darkly, to brave new worlds and beyond we go." We seek to explore and do critical reading fro ...more
35402 Loosed in Translation — 479 members — last activity Nov 06, 2022 10:43AM
Are you interested in world literature, and works in translation? Come here for recommendations, resources, links, advice on who the best translator o ...more
59543 21st Century Literature — 2848 members — last activity 0 minutes ago
For people interested in keeping up with the modern literary classics. We will be reading fiction and fine literature from 2000 to present, with the i ...more
415 The Brazil Readers — 227 members — last activity Oct 26, 2016 11:30AM
Group for readers of Brazilian fiction and non-fiction and all manner of books about Brazil.
79311 Completists' Club — 475 members — last activity Sep 26, 2021 06:42PM
A group for those attempting to complete, or who have completed, the canons of their favourite writers. Share your canon-wide knowledge and opinion wi ...more
70182 Global Book Selections — 274 members — last activity Jun 03, 2018 06:26PM
This group is to celebrate FICTION books FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD by reading them, reviewing them (if interested & linking to affiliated website), then ...more
82574 The Nobel Prize in Literature — 326 members — last activity Nov 03, 2022 03:45AM
Ah, the Nobel Prize! The decision of a jury of aristocratic Swedes who, since 1901, have awarded the prize to seven of their countrymen and one of the ...more
53954 Exceptional Books — 2315 members — last activity Jan 30, 2023 10:53AM
This book club is ONLY for books that are WRITTEN VERY WELL and have a GREAT STORY LINE. We ask that each member shelve at least 2 exceptional books ...more
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Comments (showing 1-11)    post a comment »
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message 11: by Scott

Scott Thanks for the 'accept,' saw you popping up on Briar's page and we have a fair amount of books in common. Happy reading!


message 10: by Booky

Booky thank you Claire <3


Ritwik Hi! Thanks for accepting the friend request. Looking forward to a lot of bookish discussions! :)


message 8: by Traveller (last edited Dec 19, 2014 03:14PM)

Traveller Thanks, I'll look up the Berry book you mentioned.

I do have an idea why you had trouble getting into PSS yes. The book is simply too rambling, which is a shame, because if CM had written in a more disciplined and less indulgent manner and stuck mainly with the story around Isaac, Yagharek and the other main characters, it would have been a much more gripping and immersive experience, and it would have been more obvious how character growth etc takes place.

But the man is(was? -he writes in a much more disciplined manner these days) obsessed with his excessive world-building and whacky ideas that seemed to need to be set free no matter what.

If you'd be willing to give it another chance some day, i would suggest skimming through and even skipping through the bits where he describes the city - but it's also hard to discern which bits are necessary to the plot and which not; and some of the uneccesary bits are also inventive and/or funny... ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

The Scar is slightly more tightly written, but many people did not enjoy the characters in it, though of course there is no telling who would like what.

Of course, these three books only share a setting very loosely, and the plots do not converge at all, so you could always peep at The Scar and Iron Council to see if you like them. Sadly Iron Council rambles a bit again, but there's probably quite a bit of political meat there, if Marxist fantasy is your thing. :P (The atmosphere and tone of the Bas-lag novels are quite different from volume to volume.)

If you like linguistics and semiotics,(even philosophy of language) (I seem to recall that you might) you'd most probably enjoy Embassytown


Michael Traveller, yes this is a good way to talk- if you wish, just send by message!:) any idea why I had trouble getting on in PSS? I think I also tried some 'Unlundun'... I do not know if it is over-hype but I was disappointed in TC and TC... the idea was great but the resolution too mundane for me, and I think I compared it to Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry, if you want a Rec :)


message 6: by Traveller (last edited Dec 19, 2014 03:00PM)

Traveller Hey thegift, i didn't want us to, er, overwhelm my new friend gradi3nt too much so i thought I'd chat about China here if you don't mind.

The China question is a hard one, and even moreso if PSS wasn't a good fit for you. (I think that was my fave CM, actually)

I can tell you which ones NOT to try perhaps. Kraken would be top of my list of don't go there, and after that, perhaps King Rat?

Embassytown is nice speculative fic with a spacey alien setting, and TC & TC is okay in its own right. ...but i'm going to be honest with you - despite it being long and rambling, i think i enjoyed his Bas-lag trilogy (Perdido Station, The Scar and Iron Council) the most because of its more personal, visceral feel. It is less polished than his later lit., but it has more... 'soul' if you know what I mean....


message 5: by Kris

Kris It is a pleasure to accept your friend request -- I was just about to send you one for the same reasons. I had a feeling that our shared love for Zweig suggested lots of overlap in our shelves, and that is the case! Looking forward to more discussions with you. :)


Richard Thank you for accepting the friend request. I look forward to further discussion.


Marts  (Thinker) Thanks for recommending 'The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination' by Jean-Paul Sartre... I only recently added a couple of his books to my reading list...


Michael aloha back, yes, my dad is from Southern Ontario (in December think of walking into a world-size Freezer!). must confess i have not read much romances at all: unless maybe Jane Austen counts? must say that i do not know why, but italian and japanese authors work well for me, i like italian postmodernists like Calvino, Primo Levi, Umberto Eco- then these 4 writers named Luther Blisset: you might get some romance out of their book set in the reformation, called 'Q', or if you want to try a postmodern-Dickens type book called 'The Quincunx'... otherwise, I do not know whst to recommend?


Melita Aloha! We seem to have the same taste in literature except for romances. I love Calvino! So I take it that your dad is Camadian?


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