Eva Melusine Thieme

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Eva Melusine Thieme

Goodreads Author


Born
in Tubingen, Germany
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November 2010

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EVA MELUSINE THIEME was born in Germany and has since moved across the world seven times, lugging progressively more stuff and family members along the way. She has a business degree from a German university too difficult to pronounce and an MBA from UNC Chapel Hill. After three adventure-filled years in Africa she now lives in Brentwood, TN, where she dedicates her time to her freelance writing career while often reminding her children to pick up their rooms.

Her travel memoir Kilimanjaro Diaries: Or, How I Spent a Week Dreaming of Toilets, Drinking Crappy Water, and Making Bad Jokes While Having the Time of My Life was published in March 2014 and subsequently translated into German. Both editions have become Amazon bestsellers in African
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Eva Melusine Thieme Write, write, and write. You can only become a better writer by writing. Just like you can only become a better painter by painting. Sure, you'll make…moreWrite, write, and write. You can only become a better writer by writing. Just like you can only become a better painter by painting. Sure, you'll make mistakes, and when you go back to your writing from a few years ago you will cringe. But you cannot skip the step of, well, writing, to become a better writer. Don't try to make it perfect, just write about the things you know. You will be amazed how much better you get with time.

A blog is a great start, because you get an instant readership and daily feedback, instead of laboring away for years. If you're a parent, write about parenting. If you love to shop, write about that. If you're dealing with writer's block, write about all the ways you've found to procrastinate.

And read. To write is to practice your craft, and to read is to observe the masters. Read a lot, and observe how others do it, so you can add to your toolbox. You can always learn more, and reading is not only a good way to do that, but also a fun and relaxing thing. You won't find many serious writers who don't also read a lot. Isn't it a fun profession where you can consider reading as integral part of your job description?

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Eva Melusine Thieme Aaah, summer! In theory, a great time to get to your reading list, but in practice, and particularly when you have kids in the house that need being…moreAaah, summer! In theory, a great time to get to your reading list, but in practice, and particularly when you have kids in the house that need being ferried to and fro at all hours of the day, a time where you never get to any book at all. Unless you're at the pool and then you fall asleep with the book on your wet bathing suit.

Anyhow, a friend recommended The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy, so that is on my immediate summer reading list. I also grabbed The Alice Network and Lilac Girls from a stack at Barnes and Noble when shopping for a baby gift, mainly because I liked the covers. Yeah, I know, very sophisticated given that I'm a writer. Lilac Girls also got me sold by telling me that I'd like it, because I liked The Nightingale and All the Light We Cannot See (which are both must-reads if you haven’t yet), so I took that one on good faith. And The Alice Network mentioned Espionage and Great War and I didn’t need more convincing than that. I'm a sucker for espionage and either of the world wars. Which is why I love and can highly recommend anything by Joseph Kanon (my latest favorite being Istanbul Passage). I’m currently finishing up The Other Einstein, which I can highly recommend, unless you can’t stomach the idea that the Great Einstein was, basically, a jerk. Says his wife. Either way, it’s a great glimpse into the early 1900s and the scientific community, and it’ll appeal to you especially if you’re a feminist.

The only way I seem to get any reading done these days is through my Audible subscription, which is worth every penny in gold. I never go anywhere I my car without plugging in the audio cord, which in my mind works better than Bluetooth, and plunging into my own little world, just like in the Audible ads. It works! I’ve been known to extend my listening beyond the car while unloading groceries, cooking, and lo and behold, washing all the windows. Somehow Audible is best consume on a ladder with squeegee in hand.

My all-time Audible favorites are any stories told by Jenna Lamia. Don’t get me wrong, they happen to be great books when you read them in book form as well: The Help, The Secret Life of Bees, The Invention of Wings, Saving CeeCee Honeycutt. Even if you’ve read these books, they are worth listening to all over again, because of Jenna’s amazing talents as voice narrator. Another favorite audio version of a good novel is People of the Book. This one mainly because of the Australian accent.

There you go, that’s my summer reading list in a nutshell. Please do share yours, I’m always curious!(less)
Average rating: 3.97 · 278 ratings · 44 reviews · 1 distinct workSimilar authors
Kilimanjaro Diaries: Or, Ho...

3.97 avg rating — 278 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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Recently – probably on one of the late night shows – I heard someone say that every time he starts working on a new book, he first reads Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird. That it has taught him to accept that you just have to suck it up and finish the first draft and know that every first draft in the history of mankind has been a “shitty draft,” no matter if you’re Shakespeare himself.


“Wait, I have...

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Eva Thieme rated a book did not like it
A Column of Fire by Ken Follett
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Did we actually all read the same book? I'm amazed at this book rating so well. I thought it was awful. Ken Follett isn't the best writer to begin with, but some of his earlier books were worth it for plot, and then he outclassed himself with the Cen ...more
A Column of Fire by Ken Follett
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Love and Ruin by Paula McLain
Love and Ruin
by Paula McLain (Goodreads Author)
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I love all of Paula McLain's books. She has an unparalleled ability to get to the soul of her characters. The dialog, once again, is excellent. She also gets to the heart of the dilemma faced by women with ambition of any era. I felt like I was right ...more
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Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult
Small Great Things
by Jodi Picoult (Goodreads Author)
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A very powerful book, and one that seems particularly suited to the times we live in, where race relations seem to be fraying everywhere, even if we think we've already come such a long way. The power of this book lies in the several perspectives it' ...more
Eva Thieme rated a book it was amazing
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
Little Fires Everywhere
by Celeste Ng (Goodreads Author)
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I loved this story. Don't be fooled by the everyday and seemingly well-ordered suburban setting. The first part of the book might lull you into complacency, as it's perhaps meant to do, but it sets up the fast-developing plot of the second part perfe ...more
Eva Thieme rated a book really liked it
Rules of Civility by Amor Towles
Rules of Civility
by Amor Towles (Goodreads Author)
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I came to this book after reading A Gentleman in Moscow and loving it immensely. Rules of Civility isn't as good, and I'm not sure I would have looked for more books by the same author that urgently had it been the other way around. But it's still a ...more
Eva Thieme rated a book it was amazing
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles (Goodreads Author)
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This instantly became my favorite book of 2017, just a few sentences in. And Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov has become one of my favorite fictional characters, perhaps my favorite of all time right up there with Scout. I won’t get into the details of ...more
Eva Thieme rated a book liked it
Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
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Not my favorite Steinbeck, but still worth reading as it gives insight into his thinking. Travels with Charley is a travelogue of a trip Steinbeck took later in life in a homemade RV across the United States, accompanied by his dog Charley. As he mov ...more
Eva Thieme rated a book it was amazing
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
The Handmaid's Tale
by Margaret Atwood (Goodreads Author)
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It's not exactly an uplifting tale, but dystopian worlds never are. This is one of the finest I've read. Because it so realistically plays into some of the religious sentiment present in our society. The world she describes where women can't speak fo ...more
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A Separate Peace by John Knowles
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This came into my house as my daughter's assigned reading for high school, and I inherited it with a bunch of pink and purple margin notes. I'm glad I read it. I admit I struggled a bit at times to understand the point of it all. For a coming of age ...more
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Eva Melusine Thieme, Kilimanjaro Diaries: Or, How I Spent a Week Dreaming of Toilets, Drinking Crappy Water, and Making Bad Jokes While Having the Time of My Life

“My fear is that these kids are always going to be evaluating their self-worth in terms of whether they hit the next rung society has placed in front of them at exactly the time that society has placed it. And that’s dangerous, because you’re going to slip and fall in your life.”
Frank Bruni, Where You Go Is Not Who You'll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania

“The mother of a student in Europe who was between his junior and senior years of high school called Motto in a frantic state. She had just read somewhere that college admissions offices looked for kids who had spent their summers in enriching ways, ideally doing charity work, and her son was due to be on vacation with the rest of the family in August. “Should we ditch our plans,” she asked Motto, “and have him build dirt roads?” Motto reminded her that she lived in a well-paved European capital. “Where would these dirt roads be?” he said. “India?” she suggested. “Africa?” She hadn’t worked it out. But if Yale might be impressed by an image of her son with a small spade, large shovel, rake or jackhammer in his chafed hands, she was poised to find a third-world setting that would produce that sweaty and ennobling tableau.”
Frank Bruni, Where You Go Is Not Who You'll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania

“A 2011 study done by Alan Krueger, a Princeton economics professor who served for two years as the chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, and Stacy Dale, an analyst with Mathematica Policy Research, tried to adjust for that sort of thing. Krueger and Dale examined sets of students who had started college in 1976 and in 1989; that way, they could get a sense of incomes both earlier and later in careers. And they determined that the graduates of more selective colleges could expect earnings 7 percent greater than graduates of less selective colleges, even if the graduates in that latter group had SAT scores and high school GPAs identical to those of their peers at more exclusive institutions. But then Krueger and Dale made their adjustment. They looked specifically at graduates of less selective colleges who had applied to more exclusive ones even though they hadn’t gone there. And they discovered that the difference in earnings pretty much disappeared. Someone with a given SAT score who had gone to Penn State but had also applied to the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League school with a much lower acceptance rate, generally made the same amount of money later on as someone with an equivalent SAT score who was an alumnus of UPenn. It was a fascinating conclusion, suggesting that at a certain level of intelligence and competence, what drives earnings isn’t the luster of the diploma but the type of person in possession of it. If he or she came from a background and a mindset that made an elite institution seem desirable and within reach, then he or she was more likely to have the tools and temperament for a high income down the road, whether an elite institution ultimately came into play or not. This was powerfully reflected in a related determination that Krueger and Dale made in their 2011 study: “The average SAT score of schools that rejected a student is more than twice as strong a predictor of the student’s subsequent earnings as the average SAT score of the school the student attended.”
Frank Bruni, Where You Go Is Not Who You'll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania

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