Christine Silk

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December 2015


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Christine Silk Steve Kotkin's Stalin biography and books by historian Nigel Davies.
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Christine Silk I would say that yes, Eduardo was waiting at the dock for years. But as I wrote it I also was thinking that all the taxi drivers and the photographers…moreI would say that yes, Eduardo was waiting at the dock for years. But as I wrote it I also was thinking that all the taxi drivers and the photographers were in collusion to be on the lookout for Korey. If and when a photographer on the dock spotted him, he would text the taxi drivers (including Eduardo), and they could tighten the net around him. I realize it is a bit far-fetched and Twilight-Zone-ish, but that is the way I thought about the backstory.(less)
Average rating: 3.73 · 11 ratings · 2 reviews · 3 distinct works
Chase the Sun: Nine Short S...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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Chase the Sun: Nine Short S...

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Creating a Private Foundati...

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3.44 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2003 — 7 editions
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Christine Silk rated a book it was amazing
The Unspeakable Mind by Shaili Jain
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The Unspeakable Mind is part memoir, part family history, and part overview of the current understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder. The author, Dr. Shaili Jain, M.D., is an expert on PTSD. Some years ago, her father revealed to her the horror ...more
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Biff by Bill Eddy
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You’re going to encounter high-conflict people sooner or later. They’re the ones who who seem to thrive on fights and arguments, who blame others, and frame themselves as innocent victims. Getting into a tangle with a high-conflict person wastes time ...more
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Biff by Bill Eddy
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Summer of the Big Bachi by Naomi Hirahara
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One of the biggest challenges for any writer is how to handle dialect without letting the prose get bogged down. If the spelling is complicated, the reader has to work too hard to decode what is being said. If the spelling is entirely conventional, t ...more
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Biff by Bill Eddy
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Elmore Leonard's Western Roundup #3 by Elmore Leonard
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Both stories in this volume are riveting. Leonard’s prose is economical (but not skimpy), which stylistically fits the sparse desert landscapes where the stories take place. If you’re a writer --as I am -- that may be one of the most striking aspects ...more
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Fascism by Paul Edward Gottfried
Fascism: The Career of a Concept
by Paul Edward Gottfried
recommended for: historians, political scienctists
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This book is not a quick afternoon read. The arguments are not easily reduced to Twitter-sized sound bites (even though we all chuckle in agreement when we read the current internet meme: “Everyone who disagrees with me is a fascist!”). Pay attention ...more
Christine Silk answered Goodreads's question: Christine Silk
Steve Kotkin's Stalin biography and books by historian Nigel Davies.
" Christine wrote: "I was one of the co-authors on this book. Please add it to my author dashboard. Thank you."

Thank you for doing this so promptly. :)
"
More of Christine's books…
“Imagine the cocktail party raconteur who captivates his listeners with some adventure story while taking dramatic sips from a gin martini. Chances are he is not a writer.
This seems counter-intuitive. After all, writers create characters that are so darn interesting. A good writer can hold you spellbound through a two-hundred page story. Why aren’t all writers scintillating, life-of-the-party types in person? Some are. But many are not. Part of the answer is that writers are not required to think on their feet. Spur-of-the-moment wittiness is a necessary quality for improv actors, talk-show hosts, and politicians. But writers don’t think or work in real time. They create at their own pace, spending hours or days on clever dialogue, or crafting a scene in which they get to micro-manage every detail.
Real life doesn’t work like that. And that’s okay. There is really only one place where a writer needs to be absolutely charming and irresistible; not at cocktail parties, not on television, not in front of a live audience -- but on paper.”
Christine Silk

“Critics can point out the problems in your manuscript, they can offer the right diagnosis, but they may not be able to suggest a remedy. It takes an excellent teacher, someone who has mastered the art of writing, to tell you how to correct a problem. Agents and publishers don’t have time to be teachers (and may not know the solution). A lot of critics (including those in writer’s workshops) want to help, but may not know what the correct remedy is.
But that should not stop a dedicated writer. Listen to the criticism, even if it hurts. Learn from it. Even if your critic can’t offer a solution, you will be able to find one, eventually. It may mean slaving over the manuscript until you’re ready to burn it, or it may mean putting it aside until you can look at it with fresh eyes. Let the sting of criticism drive you toward excellence.”
Christine Silk

“Imagine the cocktail party raconteur who captivates his listeners with some adventure story while taking dramatic sips from a gin martini. Chances are he is not a writer.
This seems counter-intuitive. After all, writers create characters that are so darn interesting. A good writer can hold you spellbound through a two-hundred page story. Why aren’t all writers scintillating, life-of-the-party types in person? Some are. But many are not. Part of the answer is that writers are not required to think on their feet. Spur-of-the-moment wittiness is a necessary quality for improv actors, talk-show hosts, and politicians. But writers don’t think or work in real time. They create at their own pace, spending hours or days on clever dialogue, or crafting a scene in which they get to micro-manage every detail.
Real life doesn’t work like that. And that’s okay. There is really only one place where a writer needs to be absolutely charming and irresistible; not at cocktail parties, not on television, not in front of a live audience -- but on paper.”
Christine Silk

“Critics can point out the problems in your manuscript, they can offer the right diagnosis, but they may not be able to suggest a remedy. It takes an excellent teacher, someone who has mastered the art of writing, to tell you how to correct a problem. Agents and publishers don’t have time to be teachers (and may not know the solution). A lot of critics (including those in writer’s workshops) want to help, but may not know what the correct remedy is.
But that should not stop a dedicated writer. Listen to the criticism, even if it hurts. Learn from it. Even if your critic can’t offer a solution, you will be able to find one, eventually. It may mean slaving over the manuscript until you’re ready to burn it, or it may mean putting it aside until you can look at it with fresh eyes. Let the sting of criticism drive you toward excellence.”
Christine Silk

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