Amir D. Aczel





Amir D. Aczel


Born
in Haifa, Israel
November 06, 1950

Died
November 26, 2015


Average rating: 3.74 · 6,462 ratings · 786 reviews · 36 distinct worksSimilar authors
Fermat's Last Theorem: Unlo...

3.91 avg rating — 1,227 ratings — published 1996 — 18 editions
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Entanglement

3.99 avg rating — 910 ratings — published 2002 — 16 editions
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God's Equation: Einstein, R...

3.93 avg rating — 608 ratings — published 1999 — 10 editions
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The Mystery of the Aleph: M...

3.85 avg rating — 590 ratings — published 2000 — 7 editions
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The Jesuit and the Skull: T...

3.77 avg rating — 452 ratings — published 2007 — 16 editions
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Finding Zero: A Mathematici...

3.41 avg rating — 475 ratings — published 2015 — 8 editions
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The Riddle of the Compass: ...

3.30 avg rating — 355 ratings — published 2001 — 6 editions
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Descartes's Secret Notebook...

3.58 avg rating — 292 ratings — published 2005 — 13 editions
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Why Science Does Not Dispro...

3.81 avg rating — 290 ratings — published 2013 — 7 editions
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Present at the Creation: Th...

3.69 avg rating — 247 ratings — published 2010 — 8 editions
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More books by Amir D. Aczel…
“Mathematics is not a careful march down a well cleared highway, but a journey into a strange wilderness, where the explorers often get lost.”
Amir D. Aczel, A Strange Wilderness: The Lives of the Great Mathematicians

“In so many ways, the same impulse to know the world and our place in it is at the roots of both science and spirituality. Both are attempts to illuminate the mysteries of our world and expand our vision of the greater whole. By charting the history of science, I hope these pages have shown how vital and awesome real science is. Throughout history, scientific discovery has brought us closer to the wonders of life and the universe—and immeasurably deepened our appreciation for creation. It engages the world and inspires the best in us. But the pursuit of truth should not be driven by zealous agenda. Nor should it overreach and speak with righteous authority where it’s on unsolid ground. That’s not science—and let’s not allow those who falsely invoke its name to diminish us.”
Amir D. Aczel, Why Science Does Not Disprove God

“[Davidson] Black procured cadavers for research, obtained from the Peking police department. These cadavers were mostly of people who had been executed for various crimes; the police regularly sent Black truckloads of the bodies of the executed convicts. Execution in China was by beheading, and thus the cadavers Black received lacked heads and had mutilated necks. After some time, he asked the police whether there was any possibility of getting better dead bodies for research - corpses that were intact. The next day, he received a shipment of convicts, all chained together, with a note from the police asking him to kill them in any way he chose.”
Amir D. Aczel, The Jesuit and the Skull: Teilhard de Chardin, Evolution, and the Search for Peking Man

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