Ted Macaluso

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Ted Macaluso

Goodreads Author


Born
Brooklyn, NY, The United States
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February 2016


Ted Macaluso was born in Brooklyn, New York. His father was a scientist; his mother an artist. He has been a college professor, a health policy consultant, and a successful research writer and editor for scientific studies of child nutrition and hunger. But he always loved storytelling and art. He now writes full-time. Vincent, Theo and the Fox—his first children’s book—combines his passions for adventure stories and art.

Ted studied writing at The Writer’s Center in Bethesda, Maryland, taking courses on writing for children, writing science fiction and fantasy (which he also loves), plot development and much more. In addition, Ted learned what makes a good narrative from his young son, who always wanted Dad to make up “just one more” story,
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Ted Macaluso To get my son to go on exercise walks with me I would tell him stories. They were simple action tales: Suddenly, a monster…Bam, a hero…Wham another…moreTo get my son to go on exercise walks with me I would tell him stories. They were simple action tales: Suddenly, a monster…Bam, a hero…Wham another monster. And then one day a real monster struck: Mark got very sick. He had a series of lung infections and several times a day had to sit still for twenty minutes breathing through a nebulizer. Not what an active 5 year old boy wants to do! Just before one of these episodes his grandmother was visiting and we had all gone to the National Gallery of Art to see an exhibit of van Gogh’s paintings. She bought the exhibit catalog, Van Gogh’s Van Goghs: Masterpieces from the Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam by Richard Kendall with contributions by John Leighton and Sjraar van Heugten. One afternoon when Mark was being nebulized, he asked me to tell a story. I did not have it in me. He pointed to the catalog, saying, “Read me the story.” I tried to explain, “It’s not a story.” Neither he nor Grandma would let me off easy. I had to “read” the catalog to him.

What to do? An art catalog is not a wham, bam action tale. I opened it at random and it showed Harvest at La Crau, with Montmajour in the Background (Arles, June, 1888). I thought to myself, “OK, Vincent has to be a boy to make this interesting…but what is he doing?” I surprised myself by saying, “One day, when he was a boy, Vincent van Gogh and his brother, Theo, were looking at the harvest when they saw a fox sneak into the cart.” That picture and that idea became the start of Vincent, Theo and the Fox. Vincent and Theo chased the fox through a bunch of van Gogh’s paintings until the nebulizer was done. At that point, the fox got away and the boys went home.

The tale kept Mark engaged but it was not really a story yet. When I decided to turn it into a real story I knew it needed more. I asked myself, “What do boys do?” The answer, of course, is that they grow up. And while they grow up they wonder what they will become. We all know that van Gogh became a painter, but he didn’t go there directly, trying a number of different jobs first. So as a boy in a story there is wonder and mystery when Vincent thinks about growing up. Somehow I came up with the idea that the fox was young too—he was also trying to grow up and find his way in the world. And that, I believe, is what makes Vincent, Theo and the Fox a delightful tale. We have two boys and a fox thinking about growing up and through their actions teaching each other about life. The writer, Susan Sontag, writes that “art is not only about something, it is something.” By this, she means that art isn’t like science or history, it doesn’t teach you facts you should know. Rather, literature gives readers an experience from which they learn and take their own lessons. I like to think that Vincent, Theo and the Fox achieves this: it does not teach about growing up, it lets readers learn about it.

Because the book's reproductions of van Gogh's paintings are beautiful and chase tales are exciting, readers don’t “get” what they are experiencing until it is over. But my hope is that the story stays with children and they learn while they process the experience of the story. Because the book gives a brief biography of van Gogh in an epilogue, children learn about van Gogh while processing the experience of the story. I think this really engages them in van Gogh’s art and gives the story more depth.

What do you think? I would love to read your comments!
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Average rating: 4.43 · 7 ratings · 1 review · 1 distinct work
Vincent, Theo and the Fox: ...

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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We saw Loving Vincent tonight. It is phenomenal. Strongly recommend you see it if you are interested in Vincent van Gogh.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3262342/


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3262342/videoplayer/vi1862449433?ref_=tt_ov_vi


 


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Published on December 16, 2017 22:45 • 1 view

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I'd hard about this book for a while and finally read it. Quite well done. Especially enjoyed the puzzles in the book.
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Cool having media in book. End of day though I don't find Lettie that interesting. Some of the plot twists seem artificial.
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