Ted Macaluso

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Ted Macaluso

Goodreads Author


Born
Brooklyn, NY, The United States
Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences
Philip Pullman, Leigh Bardugo, Paolo Bacigalupi, Vernor Vinge, Veronic ...more

Member Since
February 2016


Ted Macaluso writes tales of adventure, romance, and science fiction. With lots of art.

His first book, Vincent, Theo and the Fox, is an adventure story about Vincent van Gogh and growing up (picture book/early reader for ages 4-10). Kirkus Reviews called it “…a charming, unique way to introduce youngsters to great art while providing an important message.” The Washington Post wrote “…the colorful paintings jump off the pages and will give you a lot to think about….it’s cool. Very cool.”

Ted’s short story, The Recall, was a winner in The Washington City Paper’s 2018 Fiction Contest.

Ted lives in Reston, Virginia with his lovely wife, kind-hearted dog, and frZequently temperament@al word process8or.

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Popular Answered Questions

Ted Macaluso To get my son to go on exercise walks with me I would tell him stories. They were simple action tales: Suddenly, a monster…Bam, a hero…Wham another mo…moreTo get my son to go on exercise walks with me I would tell him stories. They were simple action tales: Suddenly, a monster…Bam, a hero…Wham another monster. And then one day a real monster struck: Mark got very sick. He had a series of lung infections and several times a day had to sit still for twenty minutes breathing through a nebulizer. Not what an active 5 year old boy wants to do! Just before one of these episodes his grandmother was visiting and we had all gone to the National Gallery of Art to see an exhibit of van Gogh’s paintings. She bought the exhibit catalog, Van Gogh’s Van Goghs: Masterpieces from the Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam by Richard Kendall with contributions by John Leighton and Sjraar van Heugten. One afternoon when Mark was being nebulized, he asked me to tell a story. I did not have it in me. He pointed to the catalog, saying, “Read me the story.” I tried to explain, “It’s not a story.” Neither he nor Grandma would let me off easy. I had to “read” the catalog to him.

What to do? An art catalog is not a wham, bam action tale. I opened it at random and it showed Harvest at La Crau, with Montmajour in the Background (Arles, June, 1888). I thought to myself, “OK, Vincent has to be a boy to make this interesting…but what is he doing?” I surprised myself by saying, “One day, when he was a boy, Vincent van Gogh and his brother, Theo, were looking at the harvest when they saw a fox sneak into the cart.” That picture and that idea became the start of Vincent, Theo and the Fox. Vincent and Theo chased the fox through a bunch of van Gogh’s paintings until the nebulizer was done. At that point, the fox got away and the boys went home.

The tale kept Mark engaged but it was not really a story yet. When I decided to turn it into a real story I knew it needed more. I asked myself, “What do boys do?” The answer, of course, is that they grow up. And while they grow up they wonder what they will become. We all know that van Gogh became a painter, but he didn’t go there directly, trying a number of different jobs first. So as a boy in a story there is wonder and mystery when Vincent thinks about growing up. Somehow I came up with the idea that the fox was young too—he was also trying to grow up and find his way in the world. And that, I believe, is what makes Vincent, Theo and the Fox a delightful tale. We have two boys and a fox thinking about growing up and through their actions teaching each other about life. The writer, Susan Sontag, writes that “art is not only about something, it is something.” By this, she means that art isn’t like science or history, it doesn’t teach you facts you should know. Rather, literature gives readers an experience from which they learn and take their own lessons. I like to think that Vincent, Theo and the Fox achieves this: it does not teach about growing up, it lets readers learn about it.

Because the book's reproductions of van Gogh's paintings are beautiful and chase tales are exciting, readers don’t “get” what they are experiencing until it is over. But my hope is that the story stays with children and they learn while they process the experience of the story. Because the book gives a brief biography of van Gogh in an epilogue, children learn about van Gogh while processing the experience of the story. I think this really engages them in van Gogh’s art and gives the story more depth.

What do you think? I would love to read your comments!
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Average rating: 4.22 · 50 ratings · 20 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
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Vincent, Doctor Who, and Perseverance

I sometimes wonder if the novel I’m working on will ever get published. What will people think of it? Every creator goes through this. Whether you are writing fiction or cooking a special dinner, there may come a time when you lose hope. So, for my inspiration and yours, here is my favorite Dr. Who clip—the time when Vincent van Gogh visits the museum.

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Published on August 31, 2022 11:55
The Dark Hours
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Deep Sleep
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by Steven Konkoly (Goodreads Author)
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Vincent, Doctor Who, and Perseverance

I sometimes wonder if the novel I’m working on will ever get published. What will people think of it? Every creator goes through this. Whether you are Read more of this blog post »
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Seeking Cézanne by Ted Macaluso
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The Dark Hours by Michael Connelly
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Lee Child shared a note and highlight from
Killing Floor by Lee Child
“Further On Up the Road.” Bobby Bland sings it in G major.
I love music, and was fascinated by the way a blues song could be bright and cheerful because of its key. Writing a book is a bit like writing music - both things start somewhere, go somewhere, and eventually finish somewhere - and for a book the “key” is the mood, the setting, the landscape, and so on. Most writers are frustrated musicians, and we try to live in both worlds.
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The Broken Room by Peter Clines
The Broken Room
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The Trope Thesaurus by Jennifer Hilt
The Trope Thesaurus
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The Trope Thesaurus
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Fatal Bond by Diane Capri
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The Trial of Duncan O'Brady by Preston W. Child
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The book may be great or terrible, I didn't read it (hence three stars instead of one). I feel snookered by the cover. I bought it thinking it was Preston AND Child. If the cover had said Preston W. Child rather than Preston Child I would not have be ...more
More of Ted's books…
Vincent van Gogh
“The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh
“If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere.”
Vincent Van Gogh




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