Peter Trudgill



Average rating: 3.77 · 1,915 ratings · 141 reviews · 54 distinct worksSimilar authors
Sociolinguistics: An Introd...

3.84 avg rating — 564 ratings — published 1974 — 8 editions
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Sociolinguistic Typology: S...

4.26 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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The Dialects Of England

3.88 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1990 — 5 editions
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A Glossary of Sociolinguistics

3.68 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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Sociolinguistic Variation A...

3.89 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2001 — 2 editions
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International English: A Gu...

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4.15 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1985 — 13 editions
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Dialects

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3.71 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1994 — 18 editions
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Investigations in Sociohist...

4.11 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
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On Dialect

3.09 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1983 — 2 editions
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Sociolinguistics Reader Vol...

3.89 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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“Because language and society are so closely linked, it is possible, in some cases, to encourage social change by directing attention towards linguistic reflections of aspects of society that one would like to see altered.”
Peter Trudgill, Sociolinguistics: An Introduction to Language and Society

“. . . irrational attitudes and discriminatory decisions, often made by governments or other official bodies acting out of ignorance or prejudice, have led to language policies which have had detrimental effects on children's education and even on societies as a whole.”
Peter Trudgill, Sociolinguistics: An Introduction to Language and Society

“The fact is that none of us can unilaterally decide what a word means. Meanings of words are shared between people - they are a kind of social contract we all agree to - otherwise communication would not be possible.”
Peter Trudgill



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