Rudolph Herzog



Average rating: 3.6 · 472 ratings · 94 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler...

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3.56 avg rating — 271 ratings — published 2006 — 10 editions
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A Short History of Nuclear ...

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3.76 avg rating — 156 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Ghosts of Berlin: Stories

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3.33 avg rating — 39 ratings5 editions
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Der verstrahlte Westernheld

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2012
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Heil Hitler, das Schwein is...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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“Most of Hitler's henchmen were not demons. They were overly obedient petty bourgeois who had mutated into murderers.”
Rudolph Herzog, Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler's Germany

“The historian Meike Wöhlert has analyzed and compared the judgments rendered by courts responsible for malicious acts of treason in five cities. Although her research only deals with registered cases and not unofficial ones, the results suggest that the telling of political jokes was a mass phenomenon beyond state control. In 61 percent of official cases, joke-tellers were let off with a warning, alcohol consumption often being cited as an extenuating circumstance. (People who had had one too many in bars were considered only partially responsible for their actions, and because most of the popular jokes that made it to court had been told in bars, the verdicts were accordingly lenient.)”
Rudolph Herzog, Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler's Germany

“The historical record contradicts the assumption that the Nazis sentenced large numbers of people to death during World War II for telling jokes. In the final phase of the Third Reich, some cases did receive capital sentences, but they were extreme exceptions to the rule. (We will return to them later.) The compilations of jokes that circulated in Germany after the war bore titles like Deadly Laughter and When Laughter Was Dangerous, but there is not much evidence that the jokes they contained were inevitably risky for the teller.”
Rudolph Herzog, Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler's Germany



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