Philip Matyszak


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Philip Matyszak is a British non-fiction author, primarily of historical works relating to ancient Rome. Matyszak has a doctorate in Roman history from St John's College, Oxford. In addition to being a professional author, he also teaches ancient history for Madingley Hall Institute of Continuing Education, Cambridge University.

Average rating: 4.02 · 2,923 ratings · 353 reviews · 33 distinct worksSimilar authors
Legionary: The Roman Soldie...

4.19 avg rating — 606 ratings — published 2009 — 13 editions
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The Greek and Roman Myths: ...

3.95 avg rating — 375 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
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Ancient Rome on Five Denari...

3.95 avg rating — 420 ratings — published 2007 — 13 editions
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24 Hours in Ancient Rome: A...

4.02 avg rating — 381 ratings — published 2017 — 7 editions
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Chronicle of the Roman Repu...

4.01 avg rating — 218 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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The Enemies of Rome: From H...

3.83 avg rating — 166 ratings — published 2004 — 10 editions
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Gladiator: The Roman Fighte...

4.12 avg rating — 132 ratings — published 2011 — 9 editions
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The Classical Compendium: A...

4.07 avg rating — 107 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
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Ancient Athens on 5 Drachma...

3.84 avg rating — 118 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
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The Sons of Caesar: Imperia...

3.87 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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More books by Philip Matyszak…
Gladiator: The Roman Fighte... Legionary: The Roman Soldie...
(5 books)
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4.03 avg rating — 1,185 ratings

The Gold of Tolosa The Servant of Aphrodite
(2 books)
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4.53 avg rating — 32 ratings

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“Provided the gods of Rome are given their due, it doesn't really matter to them whether their worshippers believe in them or not. Having taken part in the official rituals, a citizen is free to worship whatever other deities he pleases. Rom'es gods are there to be obeyed and respected, not loved, and they no more mind sacrifices to other deities than the taxman minds people paying other dues elsewhere. Dealing with the gods is an exchange of duties and mutual respect. Confessing a deep love for a particular god is superstitio and the person concerned is probably emotionally concerned.”
Philip Matyszak, Ancient Rome on Five Denarii a Day

“attached”
Philip Matyszak, Legionary: The Roman Soldier's (Unofficial) Manual

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