John B. Watson


Born
in Travelers Rest, South Carolina, The United States
January 09, 1878

Died
September 25, 1958

Website

Genre

Influences


John Broadus Watson (January 9, 1878 – September 25, 1958) was an American psychologist who established the psychological school of behaviorism. Watson promoted a change in psychology through his address, Psychology as the Behaviorist Views it, which was given at Columbia University in 1913. Through his behaviorist approach, Watson conducted research on animal behavior, child rearing, and advertising. In addition, he conducted the controversial "Little Albert" experiment.

Average rating: 3.74 · 137 ratings · 9 reviews · 27 distinct worksSimilar authors
Behaviorism

3.82 avg rating — 65 ratings — published 1924 — 13 editions
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The Case of Little Albert

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3.66 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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Psychology from the Standpo...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 10 ratings16 editions
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Psychological Care Of Infan...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings
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The Battle of Behaviorism: ...

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3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2007
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Behaviorism: Classic Studies

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3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2009
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Behavior - An Introduction ...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1914 — 17 editions
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Studies in Infant Psychology

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2011
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Behavior and the Concept of...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2012
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Psychology as the Behaviori...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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More books by John B. Watson…
“Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed, and my own specified world to bring them up in and I’ll guarantee to take any one at random and train him to become any type of specialist I might select—doctor, lawyer, artist, merchant-chief and, yes, even beggar-man and thief, regardless of his talents, penchants, tendencies, abilities, vocations, and race of his ancestors. (1930)”
John Broadus Watson, Behaviorism