Christopher Clark


Born
in Sydney, Australia
March 14, 1960

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Christopher Munro "Chris" Clark is an Australian historian working in England.
He was educated at Sydney Grammar School between 1972 and 1978, the University of Sydney where he studied History, and between 1985 and 1987 the Freie Universität Berlin.

He received his PhD at the University of Cambridge, having been a member of Pembroke College, Cambridge from 1987 to 1991. He is Professor in Modern European History at the University of Cambridge and since 1991 has been a Fellow of St. Catharine's College. where he is currently Director of Studies in History. In 2003 Clark was appointed University Lecturer in Modern European History, and in 2006 Reader in Modern European History. His Cambridge University professorship in history followed in 2008.
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Average rating: 4.16 · 9,147 ratings · 946 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Sleepwalkers: How Europ...

4.18 avg rating — 6,127 ratings — published 2012 — 43 editions
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Iron Kingdom: The Rise and ...

4.14 avg rating — 2,896 ratings — published 2006 — 21 editions
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Kaiser Wilhelm II

3.80 avg rating — 111 ratings — published 2000 — 12 editions
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Culture Wars: Secular-Catho...

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4.36 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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The Spark in the Tinderbox

4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013
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The Politics of Conversion:...

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1995
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Man möchte immer weinen und...

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3.61 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 2015 — 11 editions
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Ordinary Prussians: Branden...

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4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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“For a time, the word Weltpolitik seemed to capture the mood of the German middle classes and the national-minded quality press. The word resonated because it bundled together so many contemporary aspirations. Weltpolitik meant the quest to expand foreign markets (at a time of declining export growth); it meant escaping from the constraints of the continental alliance system to operate on a broader world arena. It expressed the appetite for genuinely national projects that would help knit together the disparate regions of the German Empire and reflected the almost universal conviction that Germany, a late arrival at the imperial feast, would have to play catch-up if it wished to earn the respect of the other great powers. Yet, while it connoted all these things, Weltpolitik never acquired a stable or precise meaning. Even Bernhard von Bulow, widely credited with establishing Weltpolitik as the guiding principle of German foreign policy, never produced a definitive account of what it was. His contradictory utterances on the subject suggest that it was little more than the old policy of the "free hand" with a larger navy and more menacing mood music. "We are supposed to be pursuing Weltpolitik," the former chief of the General Staff General Alfred von Waldersee noted grumpily in his diary in January 1900. "If only I knew what that was supposed to be.”
Christopher Clark, The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914

“The war of 1914–18 was the absolute negation of everything that Clausewitz had stood”
Christopher Clark, The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914

“Something broadly analogous happens when we contemplate historical events, especially catastrophic ones like the First World War. Once they occur, they impose on us (or seem to do so) a sense of their necessity. This is a process”
Christopher Clark, The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914

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