Sally M. Chetwynd

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Sally M. Chetwynd

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Ruth Moore (1903–1989)
Kenneth Roberts (1885-1957)
Nevil Shute (1899-196
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August 2014

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Sally Chetwynd has been writing since she could hold a pencil. As an ambitious eight-year-old, she ruthlessly plagiarized her favorite horse stories. Since then, her writing has improved in quality and originality (!).

During the Bicentennial of the American Revolution, she discovered living history. Wow! History didn’t have to be dusty and dry? Who knew? She got to play dress-up, camp out in exotic locations, and wear out reproduction shoes and her lungs playing the fife in every parade on the East Coast. She met her husband on the battlefield. Talk about a way to find someone who shares a common interest...

After dubbing around with a novel about the relationship between a Civil War reenactor and a museum employee, Sally finally published "
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Sally M. Chetwynd When I began professionally, no to the quill or India ink. If I remember correctly from a book on the history of drafting instruments, the pen and nib…moreWhen I began professionally, no to the quill or India ink. If I remember correctly from a book on the history of drafting instruments, the pen and nib was replaced with technical drafting pens in the 1940s or so. We were using Leroy and Koh-i-noor technical drafting pens, and ink that would not clog the finer tips was available as well. But with my Civil War reenacting interests, I have gone backward, and I now make reproduction maps of the period using pens with replaceable nibs and India ink.

As far as drafting on linen, yes, I have done that professionally. It used to be, and maybe still is, required that plans to be registered at the Massachusetts Land Court had to be drawn on linen. It is an exercise in careful drafting, because once the ink is applied, it seeps into the fibers of the linen fabric and cannot be erased. This is an advantage, because - short of burning - the image on a linen map can't be destroyed. Drop it in the mud, and you can wash it and dry it, and the image remains. During the Civil War, maps were sometimes photographed and then printed onto linen or muslin. This allowed multiple copies of the same map to be distributed to officers engaging in the same campaign, saving the time it took to (otherwise) hand-draw many copies, and the maps were far more durable and could be stuffed into a pocket.

Today's linen is not treated with starch, but with a kind of gelatin, which is dry to the touch. (I don't know if the fabric used for maps during the Civil War was treated with anything - maybe a kind of starch was applied, as you suggest - to keep ink linework from blurring upon reaching the fibers, which is the purpose of the gelatin treatment. The gelatin can be washed out, although it is not necessary. My mother (age 92) told me that when she was a girl, growing up during the Depression, one of her uncles worked with engineers (he may have been one) and he would bring home pieces of drafting linen that were too small for the standard size drawings the company used. My mother and her sisters would wash the gelatin from the linen, then trim the fabric to size and hem it to make very fine handkerchiefs, for plain use or for delicate embroidery.(less)
Sally M. Chetwynd Not at the moment. It's work I am looking to do in the future. I reached out to you because I appreciate that you posted your rates, which gives me a…moreNot at the moment. It's work I am looking to do in the future. I reached out to you because I appreciate that you posted your rates, which gives me a better idea about how to set my own rates when I get into copy editing. And I like to establish connections with people with similar interests.

Have a great Thanksgiving!(less)
Average rating: 0.0 · 0 ratings · 0 reviews · 1 distinct work
Bead of Sand

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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Without (Poetry)
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Description: a love poem
The Lighthouses o...
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Sally’s Recent Updates

Sally is on page 190 of 380 of The Lighthouses of New England: This subject is of personal interest, since I am descended from a generational legacy of lighthouse keepers in Maine. Snow was a lighthouse keeper and part of this service community for decades. His 1943 book has been updated and edited by Jeremy D'Entremont, and was appropriately reissued on the 100th birthday of Mr. Snow with support from his daughter. It focuses on the more prominent New England lighthouses.
The Lighthouses of New England by Edward Rowe Snow
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Sally finished reading
Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! by Richard Feynman
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The United States Naval Academy, Being the Yarn of the Americ... by Park Benjamin
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Washington Engineered by Vincent Lee-thorp
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Shakings. Etchings from the Naval Academy by Park Benjamin
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The River at Night by Erica Ferencik
The River at Night
by Erica Ferencik (Goodreads Author)
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A Most Fortunate Ship by Tyrone G. Martin
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Sally is finished with A Most Fortunate Ship: An excellent narrative about this national icon. Clearly written with great details, especially such incidents as when the old vessel was to be towed between ports. She took off on her own and out-sailed the vessel hauling her. Another encouraging incident was when a modern ship bumped into her in port: Old Ironsides suffered a few splinters; the steel ship needed significant repairs. Definitely worth a read.
A Most Fortunate Ship by Tyrone G. Martin
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Sally made a comment in the group Language & GrammarWord Associations II the Sequel topic
" Linda wrote: "Capriccio Italien"

Oh, my! That's one of my favorites!
"
" Great news, Satin! Thanks for the review. "To thine own self be true:" this is probably the most important message we can take to heart, in these time ...more "
More of Sally's books…
31471 Goodreads Author Feedback Group — 10844 members — last activity 4 hours, 24 min ago
This is the official group for authors to give Goodreads feedback about the site. Share your thoughts and questions about the Goodreads Author Program ...more
2740 Language & Grammar — 2004 members — last activity 5 hours, 26 min ago
This group is for word lovers and has topics both serious (grammatical questions and concerns) and not so serious (word play and word games of all sor ...more
435 History is Not Boring — 1981 members — last activity Apr 27, 2018 11:31AM
Why do people think history is boring? I don't get it.
191890 Beta Reading and Editing — 138 members — last activity Jul 11, 2018 09:18AM
If your book needs major revisions, a new set of eyes, or just some polishing, this is the place to be. We'll help your manuscript shine!



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message 2: by David

David Dennington Thank you for being a friend, Sally.
Best regards,
David


message 1: by Sally

Sally I've dug into a couple of novels recently, all of which I have picked up in yard sales and second-hand shops (my favorite places to shop).

"Waiting For Spring" by R.J. Keller, a contemporary story set in the middle of Maine, where a recently divorced woman flees to a small town to escape the scorn of her past life, eventually coming to terms with her mistakes. I initially thought this perhaps too long, but the length works, as the protagonist carries the reader along with her through her journey from bleakness to fulfillment.

"Sky Blue" by Travis Thrasher, a modern tale of lost love, told by protagonist Colin Scott, a literary agent who is burned out and jaded in his profession, which feeds the growing distance between him and the wife he loves deeply. I found the resolution a little disappointing; I think the author employed a deux ex machina, albeit subtle and cleverly wrought.


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