William Styron


Born
in Newport News, Virginia, The United States
June 11, 1925

Died
November 01, 2006

Genre


William Styron (1925–2006), born in Newport News, Virginia, was one of the greatest American writers of his generation. Styron published his first book, Lie Down in Darkness, at age twenty-six and went on to write such influential works as the controversial and Pulitzer Prize–winning The Confessions of Nat Turner and the international bestseller Sophie’s Choice.

Average rating: 4.12 · 113,418 ratings · 4,743 reviews · 65 distinct worksSimilar authors
Sophie's Choice

4.19 avg rating — 75,735 ratings — published 1979 — 135 editions
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Darkness Visible: A Memoir ...

4.04 avg rating — 17,489 ratings — published 1990 — 59 editions
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The Confessions of Nat Turner

3.96 avg rating — 13,090 ratings — published 1967 — 58 editions
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Lie Down in Darkness

3.85 avg rating — 2,626 ratings — published 1951 — 50 editions
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A Tidewater Morning

3.86 avg rating — 975 ratings — published 1993 — 22 editions
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Set This House On Fire

3.71 avg rating — 678 ratings — published 1960 — 25 editions
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The Long March

3.64 avg rating — 442 ratings — published 1952 — 20 editions
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The Suicide Run: Five Tales...

3.33 avg rating — 216 ratings — published 2009 — 14 editions
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Havanas in Camelot: Persona...

3.99 avg rating — 140 ratings — published 2008 — 9 editions
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This Quiet Dust: And Other ...

3.88 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 1982 — 13 editions
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More books by William Styron…
“A great book should leave you with many experiences, and slightly exhausted at the end. You live several lives while reading.”
William Styron, Conversations with William Styron

“We're all in this game together.”
William Styron

“A phenomenon that a number of people have noted while in deep depression is the sense of being accompanied by a second self — a wraithlike observer who, not sharing the dementia of his double, is able to watch with dispassionate curiosity as his companion struggles against the oncoming disaster, or decides to embrace it. There is a theatrical quality about all this, and during the next several days, as I went about stolidly preparing for extinction, I couldn't shake off a sense of melodrama — a melodrama in which I, the victim-to-be of self-murder, was both the solitary actor and lone member of the audience.”
William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness

Polls

September 2017 New School Classic Poll

 
  46 votes, 14.2%

The Secret History by Donna Tartt, 1992, 559 pgs
 
  35 votes, 10.8%

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, 1985, 324 pgs
 
  30 votes, 9.3%

The Godfather by Mario Puzo, 1969, 448 pgs
 
  29 votes, 9.0%

Dubliners by James Joyce, 1914, 207 pgs
 
  27 votes, 8.4%

Sophie's Choice by William Styron, 1979, 562 pgs
 
  19 votes, 5.9%

 
  18 votes, 5.6%

 
  18 votes, 5.6%

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, 1906, 335 pgs
 
  16 votes, 5.0%

Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse, 1927, 256 pgs
 
  16 votes, 5.0%

Possession by A.S. Byatt, 1990, 555 pgs
 
  14 votes, 4.3%

Swann's Way by Marcel Proust, 1913, 468 pgs
 
  12 votes, 3.7%

 
  11 votes, 3.4%

We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, 1924, 225 pgs
 
  11 votes, 3.4%

The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran, 1923, 127 pgs
 
  10 votes, 3.1%

A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh, 1934, 308 pgs
 
  10 votes, 3.1%

The Street by Ann Petry, 1946, 435 pgs
 
  1 vote, 0.3%

Maud Martha by Gwendolyn Brooks, 1953, 180 pgs
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

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